10 false facts most people think are true

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
898
#1
Up until the late 16th century, everyone "knew" that the sun and planets revolved around the Earth. Up until the late 19th century, epidemic illnesses such as cholera and the plague were "known" to be caused by a poisonous mist filled with particles from rotting things. Up until the early 20th century, the most common procedure performed by surgeons for thousands of years was bloodletting, because we "knew" that blood drained from the body balanced the whacky humors responsible for poor health. Well alrighty then.

But as misinformed as all that may sound now, our predecessors believed these "facts" with the same certainty that we believe that the Earth is round and hot fudge sundaes make us fat.

Living in a time of such dazzling science and technology, we stand firmly behind our beliefs … even if so much of what we think we know to be correct is actually wrong. Here are some of the more common misconceptions, ideas that may have started as wives' tales or that came from a faulty study that was later proven wrong. Whatever the case may be, these facts are false.

1. Going out in the cold with a wet head will make you sick

"Put a hat on or you’ll catch your death of a cold," screeches every micromanaging momma as her charges march off into the winter wonderland. But in numerous studies addressing the topic, people who are chilled are no more likely to get sick than those who were not. And a wet or dry head makes no difference. (But these tips can help you stop a cold before it starts.)

2. Vikings wore horned helmets

Is there anything more "Viking warrior" than a helmet fitted with horns? Nary a portrayal shows the seafaring Norse pirates without the iconic headgear. Alas, horned hats were not worn by the warriors. Although the style did exist in the region, they were only used for early ceremonial purposes and had largely faded out by the time of the Vikings. Several major misidentifications got the myth rolling, and by the time costume designers for Wagner’s "Der Ring des Nibelungen" put horned helmets on the singers in the late 19th century, there was no going back.

3. Sugar makes kids go bonkers

The Journal of the American Medical Association published a review of 23 studies on the subject of kids and sugar, the conclusion: Sugar doesn’t affect behavior. And it's possible that it is the idea itself that is so ingrained as fact that it affects our perception. Case in point: In one study mothers were told that their sons had consumed a drink with a high sugar content. Although the boys had actually consumed sugar-free drinks, the mothers reported significantly higher levels of hyperactive behavior. That said, some scientists warn that sugar can make you dumb.

4. You lose most of your body heat through your head

Everyone knows that you lose somewhere around 98 percent of your body heat through your head, which is why you have to wear a hat in the cold. Except that you don’t. As reported in The New York Times and elsewhere, the amount of heat released by any part of the body depends mostly on the surface area — on a cold day you would lose more heat through an exposed leg or arm than a bare head.

5. You will get arthritis from cracking your knuckles
It seems reasonable, but it's not true either. You will not get arthritis from cracking your knuckles. There is no evidence of such an association, and in limited studies performed there was no change in occurrence of arthritis between "habitual knuckle crackers" and "non crackers." There have been several reports in medical literature that have linked knuckle cracking with injury of the ligaments surrounding the joint or dislocation of the tendons, but not arthritis.

6. Napoleon was short

Napoleon's height was once commonly given as 5 feet 2 inches, but many historians have now given him extra height. He was 5 feet 2 inches using French units, but when converted into Imperial units, the kind we are accustomed to, he measured almost 5 feet 7 inches inches tall — which was actually slightly taller than average for a man in France at the time.

7. You have to stretch before exercise

Stretching before exercise is the main way to improve performance and avoid injury, everyone stretches … but researchers have been finding that it actually slows you down. Experts reveal that stretching before a run can result in a 5 percent reduction of efficiency; meanwhile, Italian researchers studying cyclists confirmed that stretching is counterproductive. Furthermore, there has never been sufficient scientific evidence that pre-exercise stretching reduces injury risk.

8. Cholesterol in eggs is bad for the heart

The perceived association between dietary cholesterol and risk for coronary heart disease stems from dietary recommendations proposed in the 1960s that had little scientific evidence, other than the known association between saturated fat and cholesterol and animal studies where cholesterol was fed in amounts far exceeding normal intakes. Since then, study after study has found that dietary cholesterol (the cholesterol found in food) does not negatively raise your body’s cholesterol. It is the consumption of saturated fat that is the demon here. So eat eggs, don’t eat steak.

9. Dogs age at seven years per one human year

Your 3-year-old dog is 21 years old in human years, right? Not according to experts. The general consensus is that dogs mature faster than humans, reaching the equivalent of 21 years in only two, and then aging slows down to more like four human years per year. "Dog Whisperer" Cesar Millan’s site recommends this way to calculate your dog’s human-age equivalent: Subtract two from the age, multiply that by four and add 21.

10. George Washington had wooden teeth

Our first president starting losing his teeth in his 20s, but contrary to popular belief, his dentures were not made of wood. Although built-in toothpicks would have been handy, Washington had four sets of dentures that were made from gold, hippopotamus ivory, lead, and human and animal teeth (horse and donkey teeth were common components in the day). Also of note: The dentures had bolts to hold them together and springs to help them open, all the better to eat one of his favorite treats, Mary Washington's seriously delicious gingerbread.
http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/stories/10-false-facts-most-people-think-are-true
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Jan 12, 2010
398
#2
I don't believe that shit about stretching.
 

Rash Rendering

Registered User
Feb 9, 2010
188
#3
I hate the one about shaving makes the hair grow back thicker. Shaving doesnt make more follicles grow, dummies
 

DiggerNick

Well-Known Member
Donator
Oct 9, 2012
288
#4
Oh, I thought this was related to Black History Month and all the stuff that was allegedly invented by blacks.

Oh well, the one myth that I hate is that MSG is bad for you. It's a load of bullshit, and it makes food taste delicious.
 

Neon

ネオン
Donator
Mar 23, 2008
513
#5
Nobody ever said Napoleon was short for his time, just that he was short. 5'7" is short. QED.

Also, I always knew the dog year thing to just be a rough estimate based on their life phases. Meaning that if a dog reached maturity at around 2-2.5 years, then you could kinda roughly translate that to a 7:1 ratio. The same applies for lifespan (more like 5:1 or 6:1 but whatever).
 

Mags

LDAR, bitch.
Donator
Oct 22, 2004
763
#7
Oh, I thought this was related to Black History Month and all the stuff that was allegedly invented by blacks.

Oh well, the one myth that I hate is that MSG is bad for you. It's a load of bullshit, and it makes food taste delicious.
Same with aspertame.
 

fletcher

Darkness always says hello.
Donator
Feb 20, 2006
513
#8
I could have sworn I saw this list on Cracked at some point in time, then I googled it and there were no less than three similar articles on the first page.
 

NotSoFast

Registered User
Apr 23, 2006
498
#9
I always though the 'losing 98% of heat through your head' thing assumed that you would already be wearing proper cold weather clothing, except for a hat. If properly insulated otherwise, the number seems pretty plausible.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Jan 12, 2010
398
#10
I always though the 'losing 98% of heat through your head' thing assumed that you would already be wearing proper cold weather clothing, except for a hat. If properly insulated otherwise, the number seems pretty plausible.
That's what I figured also... 98% of it leaves through your head if the rest of your body is insulated with clothing (as it usually is on a cold day, unless you're camping with KyleDriver).
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
438
#11
Not a good day for THP. Another LIE uncovered in his stories.

I wore that idiotic Viking horn helmet around the house for a week after the Halloween party... even wore it when I went to get the mail out of the mailbox... waving at neighbors and perfect strangers like, "What up? Rockin' the Viking helm... nothing to see... go on about your bidness."
Next he's gonna tell me there's really no Mama Haystacks. :(
 

Poison The Well

Somebody poisoned the water-hole!
Jan 7, 2008
243
#12
I don't believe that shit about stretching.
Stretching afterward is better for you. It helps start loosening up your muscles once you've worked out and helps the release of lactic acid build up so you don't cramp or get overly sore.

I'm not a doctor.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Jan 12, 2010
398
#13
Stretching afterward is better for you. It helps start loosening up your muscles once you've worked out and helps the release of lactic acid build up so you don't cramp or get overly sore.

I'm not a doctor.
Yup, after the workout is more important than before, but both help.

I'm not a doctor either, but I did jerk off to nurse porn earlier today.
 

NuttyJim

Registered User
Feb 18, 2006
638
#15
I don't believe the whole "muscle weighs more than fat" theory.
 

MTJonny

Well-Known Member
Donator
Apr 24, 2009
443
#17
My 15 month old has barely had any sugar ever, and only in small doses. On Valentines day he got a giant cupcake and giant lollipop. He was a fucking monster like I'd never seen, you not telling me sugar doesn't affect kids.
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
608
#18
My 15 month old has barely had any sugar ever, and only in small doses. On Valentines day he got a giant cupcake and giant lollipop. He was a fucking monster like I'd never seen, you not telling me sugar doesn't affect kids.
My boy had only titty milk and one piece of raw antelope meat when we were butchering in the kitchen, until his first birthday. We slid a cake in front of him and he went to town on it and was out of his fucking skull until midnight.