Adobe Announces Subscription-based Pricing

stellarcomics

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#1
http://www.macworld.com/article/116..._new_creative_cloud_subscription_service.html

Adobe has launched the much-anticipated sixth version of its Creative Suite—14 separate applications, including two companion apps—spanning a vast range of creative workflows and pursuits, targeting artists, graphic designers, photographers, videographers, multimedia specialists, and Web designers.

Adobe has debuted Creative Cloud, an overarching collection of products and services of which the new Creative Suite 6 (CS6) is a huge part. Creative Cloud encompasses all of CS6 and throws in a broad selection of new online applications and services that will be available only by subscription.
$50/ with a year contract or $75 month to month.

This pisses me off, because I paid $1299 for CS5 back in October. Fuck me.
 
Dec 9, 2004
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Baton Rouge
#3
you already need a fucking super computer to run their shit installed on a machine, i'm sure it will be much better when you and 10 million other people are hitting all their servers back and forth using Photoshop online.....
 

stellarcomics

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you already need a fucking super computer to run their shit installed on a machine, i'm sure it will be much better when you and 10 million other people are hitting all their servers back and forth using Photoshop online.....
No, you dl the apps individually on your computer, it's the licensing that's a subscription. Think of it as DRM.
 

Party Rooster

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#6
you already need a fucking super computer to run their shit installed on a machine, i'm sure it will be much better when you and 10 million other people are hitting all their servers back and forth using Photoshop online.....
I doubt it'll be like using it online. It'll probably just verify your registration when you launch the program.

Probably cut down on pirating. When I was in college I needed to use it for an internship I was doing and no way I could have afforded to pay full price for it (or even the student version), but I could definitely have justified dropping $75 on it for a project or two.
 

stellarcomics

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#7
Hence my prediction of epic fail. Professionals are just like novices - they don't like DRM.
Dude; I run my own studio; I would have GLADLY paid $50 a month instead of dropping $1300 (money I could really use right now, btw). All to be legit (and before anybody says it; I am a LEGAL company in the state of Ohio – registered and all). The only software I had before I opened my own place was from my previous job; which they would have ratted me out for.
 

Neon

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#8
Dude; I run my own studio; I would have GLADLY paid $50 a month instead of dropping $1300 (money I could really use right now, btw). All to be legit (and before anybody says it; I am a LEGAL company in the state of Ohio – registered and all). The only software I had before I opened my own place was from my previous job; which they would have ratted me out for.
But you never pay it off. Eventually you will end up spending more than $1300. It'll cost you $1300 for 26 months usage. Sure, $1300 sounds like a hit, but then you have it forever. What if you don't want to update to CS7? What if 6 is all you'll ever need?
 

stellarcomics

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But you never pay it off. Eventually you will end up spending more than $1300. It'll cost you $1300 for 26 months usage. Sure, $1300 sounds like a hit, but then you have it forever. What if you don't want to update to CS7? What if 6 is all you'll ever need?
The advantage is that every 2 years when Adobe makes an update, you don't have to "upgrade", the new suite is supported under the same subscription. You would need to dl the new apps though. The cost under contract is about $580 a year, or roughly $1200 every two years. For a small studio (like mine) it's easier to manage $50 a month than it is to cough up $1300 AT ONCE. Plus you'll have access to ALL of Adobe's stuff (like Flash, Fireworks, etc.) a la carte instead of just buying a smaller suite. I bought CS5 Basic which only includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Acrobat Pro X - the only programs I actively use. I just hope they allow a reduced subscription fee for those of us who have full licenses.
 

Neon

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#10
The advantage is that every 2 years when Adobe makes an update, you don't have to "upgrade", the new suite is supported under the same subscription. You would need to dl the new apps though. The cost under contract is about $580 a year, or roughly $1200 every two years. For a small studio (like mine) it's easier to manage $50 a month than it is to cough up $1300 AT ONCE. Plus you'll have access to ALL of Adobe's stuff (like Flash, Fireworks, etc.) a la carte instead of just buying a smaller suite. I bought CS5 Basic which only includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Acrobat Pro X - the only programs I actively use. I just hope they allow a reduced subscription fee for those of us who have full licenses.
I still don't like the idea of not being able to just pay a price for a product and then own it.
 

stellarcomics

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#11
I truly believe the future for software is reduced upfront costs at this model rather than paying thousands of dollars for software thats hopelessly out of date in 2-3 years. One thing that many of you may not know is that large companies (like P&G) force their studios to update their software to an "operating standard" every two or so years. That means EVERY business that wants to do business with them HAS TO use a certain version of Mac OSX or Windows, certain fonts, AND a certain version of Adobe Creative Suite, no matter what it costs your company to upgrade.
Adobe will "work with" a company to get this done, but it's still costly as fuck.
One more thing, my old company made a deal with Adobe where they basically GAVE them a major piece of software a few years ago in order to help bury a MAJOR competitor. If you have a few "quarks*" in your system, you'd know what I'm saying.
*how's that for vague?

Edit; here's the story in case you don't believe me:
http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/showcase/index.cfm?event=casestudydetail&casestudyid=283448&loc=en_us
 

Don the Radio Guy

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#12
From overpriced to "you don't own it."

Adobe are fucking retards.

Make Photoshop $99 and you'd actually sell it. As is, I'd bet less than one percent of copies are legit. If they increased that to 5 percent, they'd be set. This scheme will cut that 1% in half.
 

stellarcomics

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#13
probably true, but I bet they'd still get people to come aboard legally now that it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. As I said, I would have kept using LPK's software if I weren't afraid of a spot-check fom Adobe (yes, they do that to businesses).
 

stellarcomics

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#14
BTW; don't think I'm "rah rah" Adobe. Besides the fact that I make my living from thier software. My purchase of CS5 cost more than I've paid for ANY computer. Hell, I considered taking a teaching job just to get the teacher/non-profit discount (it's like $299).
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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#15
Primavera is pulling the same shit with their scheduling software. They are moving to a cloud based server which both runs software and verifies subscriptions. It's the worst of both worlds because it requires an uninterrupted internet connection, but is still a bullshit resource hog on your machine. I've pretty much given up on using it even though the agencies are slow to adapt and still demand their schedules done on it. For quick projects I just use my Microsoft Project suite which, although is the Evil Empire of Microsoft, the entire package totals $400 and integrates beautifully with Word and Excel.
 

Party Rooster

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#16
I still don't like the idea of not being able to just pay a price for a product and then own it.
I think they're just adding this as a separate option. Relax, if you still want to throw $1200 at Adobe all at once I'm sure they'll take it. And there's frequently deals to take advantage of if you're the kind of guy that likes to shop around to get it for even less.

Another benefit is that if you've got a subscription-based version you'll be able to edit something you did on another computer when you're away from your office.
 

stellarcomics

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#17
And they just announced that current users with a valid license can upgrade to CS6 for $30/month for a year. That's $360; I'm in.
 
Dec 9, 2004
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Baton Rouge
#18
Everytime I have to order another copy CS I want to burn adobe to the ground. Their corporate site website is horrendous to try and navigate and it's their products are ridiculously overpriced.
 

stellarcomics

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#20
I still prefer Corel.
EWWWW! A long time ago (1998) I briefly worked for a sportswear company in South Bend (Cadre Athletic now called St. Clair Apparel). The asshole art director ONLY knew Corel Draw and FORCED everyone else to use it (on PC's, no less. This was back when PC's BLEW for graphics). I used to sneak working in Illustrator (version 10) and export it to Corel Draw for his stupid ass. Later I got into an argument with him that almost turned into a fist fight. 1st and only job I've ever quit; I'm amazed I lasted 6 months. Not even 3 years later dumbass got fired and so far has never worked in design again.
 

samurai

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#21
I go back to the dark ages of Quark, which I hated, and Illustrator. My intro to Graphic design was born out of desperation. I had to teach myself how to use Illustrator and completely re-do a blister card design in less than 24 hours, or lose a giant job. The intuitive ease of Illustrator made it possible. To this day, 20 years later, it's still one of my proudest moments.
 

ruckstande

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#22
EWWWW! A long time ago (1998) I briefly worked for a sportswear company in South Bend (Cadre Athletic now called St. Clair Apparel). The asshole art director ONLY knew Corel Draw and FORCED everyone else to use it (on PC's, no less. This was back when PC's BLEW for graphics). I used to sneak working in Illustrator (version 10) and export it to Corel Draw for his stupid ass. Later I got into an argument with him that almost turned into a fist fight. 1st and only job I've ever quit; I'm amazed I lasted 6 months. Not even 3 years later dumbass got fired and so far has never worked in design again.
I learned on Illustrator and used it for years. Started using Cottrell and never looked back. Illustrator blows.
 
Dec 9, 2004
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Baton Rouge
#23
I just order the CS for our graphic artists. We still have a couple old schoolers who prefer corel.

Personally, if I can't do it in Paint.NET, I don't need to do it.
 

stellarcomics

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#24
I learned on Illustrator and used it for years. Started using Cottrell and never looked back. Illustrator blows.
Can't comment on Corel Draw any more; I haven't used anything but illustrator since then… going on 14 years now. I'd used it many years before (the VERY first mac program I learned how to use back in '89).
What that dude refused to admit was that somewhere back then Illustrator on macs was the standard for design, but he was terrified to learn anything new (hell using a desktop scanner scared him). He got bounced out of the business because most studios exclusively use adobe creative suite (as it's known now) on mostly macs (although PC's have caught up). He didn't know enough to get hired any more (and he was in his late 40's a decade ago).

I used to like Freehand, but that's long dead. Expression was good too (another dead drawing program).
 

samurai

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#25
What that dude refused to admit was that somewhere back then Illustrator on macs was the standard for design, but he was terrified to learn anything new (hell using a desktop scanner scared him). He got bounced out of the business because most studios exclusively use adobe creative suite (as it's known now) on mostly macs (although PC's have caught up).
The fact that he was an Art Director who used PC's speaks volumes to his ineptitude. Especially back then.