Al-Queda tries to blow up U.S. bound jet.

the Streif

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U.S. counterterrorism official: U.S., international intelligence agencies foil attempt to blow up a U.S.-bound jetliner.

Just on CNN right now.

No link just yet.
 

the Streif

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May 7th, 2012
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Official: Attempt to blow up U.S.-bound plane thwarted

Editor's note: U.S. and international intelligence agencies have broken up an attempt to blow up a U.S.-bound jetliner, a U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN. This story is rapidly developing. Follow the live blog below for more details.

[Updated at 6:09 p.m. ET] A U.S. official told CNN the plot was disrupted "well before it was ever a threat to the United States.”

The official added that al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula was the group responsible for the plot.

"We believe AQAP produced the device, and we believe it was intended to be used by a suicide bomber on an aircraft," the official said. "The device and the plot are consistent with what we know about AQAP’s plans, intentions, and capabilities. They remain committed to striking targets in Yemen, Saudi Arabia, the Homeland, and Europe. And AQAP is probably feeling pressure to conduct a successful attack to, from their perspective, avenge the deaths of Bin Laden and (Anwar al-Awlaki).”

The official added, as others have, that the device has the hallmark's of their previous bombs including the failed assassination attempt on Saudi security official Mohammed Bin Nayif as well as the failed 2009 Christmas Day bombing.

"While similar, a preliminary review of this device shows that it has some significant differences from the device used in the Christmas day attack," the U.S. official said. "It is clear that AQAP is revamping its bomb techniques to try to avoid the causes of the failure of the 2009 device."

The official said the FBI was thoroughly examining the device.

The U.S. official added it believed that the threat from al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsular is due in part to territorial gains they were able to make during Yemen's political standoff in early 2011.

"Those territorial gains have allowed the group to establish additional training camps," the official said.

[Updated at 5:58 p.m. ET] Defense Secretary Leon Panetta confirmed the plot during a press conference on an unrelated issue.

"What this incident makes clear is that this country ahs to continue to remain vigilant against those that would seek to attack this country," Panetta said. "We will do everything necessary to keep America safe"

[Updated at 5:36 p.m. ET] CNN Terrorism Analyst Paul Cruickshank says one of the key things officials will be looking at is the exact make-up of the device and how it may be similar or different to the device used in the attempted bombing of an airliner in 2009.

Cruickshank said the suspect in the 2009 attempt, dubbed the "underwear bomber" wore the device for a long time as he traveled throughout Africa and it may have become desensitized. Tests on this device may allow officials to learn more about what changes al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula may have been made following the failed bombing.

Al Qaeda's biggest threat: al Asiri

[Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET] Matt Chandler, a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, released a statement saying that they had no specific threat about an active plot against the U.S.

The Department of Homeland Security statement added that the incident showed that enemies still have a high interest in targeting air transportation, which underscores the continued need for increased security at airports.

The statement reads:

“We have no specific, credible information regarding an active terrorist plot against the U.S. at this time, although we continue to monitor efforts by al-Qaeda and its affiliates to carry out terrorist attacks, both in the Homeland and abroad. Since this IED demonstrates our adversaries’ interest in targeting the aviation sector, DHS continues, at the direction of the President, to employ a risk-based, layered approach to ensure the security of the traveling public.

"These layers include threat and vulnerability analysis, prescreening and screening of passengers, using the best available technology, random searches at airports, federal air marshal coverage and additional security measures both seen and unseen. DHS will continue to work with our federal, state, local, international and private sector partners to identify potential threats and take appropriate protective measures. As always, we encourage law enforcement and security officials, as well as the general public, to maintain vigilance and report suspicious activity to the appropriate authorities.”

[Updated at 5:16 p.m. ET] The FBI released a statement Monday afternoon saying that the device was seized abroad.

It reads in full:

"As a result of close cooperation with our security and intelligence partners overseas, an improvised explosive device (IED) designed to carry out a terrorist attack has been seized abroad. The FBI currently has possession of the IED and is conducting technical and forensics analysis on it. Initial exploitation indicates that the device is very similar to IEDs that have been used previously by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) in attempted terrorist attacks, including against aircraft and for targeted assassinations. The device never presented a threat to public safety, and the U.S. government is working closely with international partners to address associated concerns with the device. We refer you to the Department of Homeland Security, including the Transportation Security Administration, regarding ongoing security measures to safeguard the American people and the traveling public."

[Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET] CNN Chief White House Correspondent Jessica Yellen reports that a counterterrorism official said they do not believe the attack was planned to coincide with the anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden.

Officials said they believed the device never posed a threat to the public and heralded the thwarted plot and recovered device as a sign that American intelligence capabilities have improved.

[Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET] Caitlin Hayden, the Deputy National Security Council Spokesperson, released a statement about the plot on behalf of the White House:

"The President was first informed about the plot in April by his Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Advisor John Brennan, and he has received regular updates and briefings as needed from his national security team. While the President was assured that the device did not pose a threat to the public, he directed the Department of Homeland Security and law enforcement and intelligence agencies to take whatever steps necessary to guard against this type of attack. The disruption of this IED plot underscores the necessity of remaining vigilant against terrorism here and abroad. The President thanks all intelligence and counterterrorism professionals involved for their outstanding work and for serving with the extraordinary skill and commitment that their enormous responsibilities demand.”

[Updated at 5:03 p.m. ET] A U.S. counterterrorism official said the specific device was "nonmetallic" and was made to be used by a suicide bomber on an airliner.

The device is different from what was used by the "underwear bomber" in 2009, but it was in the same category, the official said. Those changes show al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula is adapting its tactics.

[Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET] U.S. and international intelligence agencies have broken up an attempt to blow up a U.S.-bound jetliner, a U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN on Monday.

"This is a success story," the U.S. official said, adding that an explosive device was recovered.

The device has the hallmarks of previous bombing attempts by members of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula including those used in the attempted bombing of a U.S. airliner on Christmas Day in 2009 and against a senior Saudi official earlier in 2009, according to the U.S official. Both devices were associated with Ibrahim Hassan al Asiri, the official said.

The plot was disrupted before it threatened Americans or allies and no airlines were at risk, the U.S official said.

The recovery of the device underscores the need to remain vigilant against a resilient and determined enemy, the official said.

Investigators are looking to analyze the device and expect it will yield valuable insights that will assist in adapting security practices here and abroad, officials said.

This story is developing. We will bring you the latest information as soon as we get it.
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/05/07/official-attempt-to-blow-up-u-s-bound-plane-thwarted/?hpt=hp_t1
 

caniseeyourtaint

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Yet you sheeple and trendypaths believe the government when they say you are now safe from al-ciaeda. When will the slaves learn.
 

Mags

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It's just an 0bama power grab.

More fear = more taxes for the illuminati.
 

lajikal

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Yet you sheeple and trendypaths believe the government when they say you are now safe from al-ciaeda. When will the slaves learn.
This would've been an epic act of terrorism. Millions.. if not, billions, of innocent lives were saved. 9/11 times 11.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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Obama didn't waste time wagging the dog to avoid all that bad press from his fake girlfriend story.
 

Neon

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Hey, remember that CIA assessment about Al-Qaeda being unable to carry out 9/11-type attacks from last week? Yeah, I'm pretty sure they didn't mean they were unable to because they would get stopped. Oops.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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Hey, remember that CIA assessment about Al-Qaeda being unable to carry out 9/11-type attacks from last week? Yeah, I'm pretty sure they didn't mean they were unable to because they would get stopped. Oops.
To be fair, blowing up one plane with trunks full of C-4 hardly approaches "a 9-11-type" attack. That's more of a Pan Am 103 type attack.
 

Neon

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To be fair, blowing up one plane with trunks full of C-4 hardly approaches "a 9-11-type" attack.
It is much, much harder than a 9/11-type attack. Those people only needed to get box cutters on the plane.

Don't be daft, if they meant it like you are implying, then basically they are saying: "9/11 can't happen again because it happened once so now we will see it coming," which is even more retarded than what I am saying they said, which is that Al-Qaeda no longer has the wherewithal to carry out a serious large scale terrorist attack. Blowing up a U.S.-bound plane with C-4 is absolutely that, especially if you detonate it over, say, a fucking city. Hell, you blow up a 747-400 over the ocean and you kill almost double the amount that died in the Pentagon on 9/11.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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It is much, much harder than a 9/11-type attack. Those people only needed to get box cutters on the plane.

Don't be daft, if they meant it like you are implying, then basically they are saying: "9/11 can't happen again because it happened once so now we will see it coming," which is even more retarded than what I am saying they said, which is that Al-Qaeda no longer has the wherewithal to carry out a serious large scale terrorist attack. Blowing up a U.S.-bound plane with C-4 is absolutely that, especially if you detonate it over, say, a fucking city. Hell, you blow up a 747-400 over the ocean and you kill almost double the amount that died in the Pentagon on 9/11.
A 9/11-type hijacking would be extremely difficult to pull off nowadays, especially with a domestic airliner. Not only are screenings much more controlled (TSA conspiracies notwithstanding), but there are armored cockpit doors and potential air marshalls on flights to contend with. Additionally, the tolerance for a non-responsive airliner in US airspace would be very low and would likely end up on the wrong end of a sidewinder before it approached a major population center.
 

Neon

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A 9/11-type hijacking would be extremely difficult to pull off nowadays, especially with a domestic airliner. Not only are screenings much more controlled (TSA conspiracies notwithstanding), but there are armored cockpit doors and potential air marshalls on flights to contend with. Additionally, the tolerance for a non-responsive airliner in US airspace would be very low and would likely end up on the wrong end of a sidewinder before it approached a major population center.
Yes, but that wasn't the point of the CIA assessment, otherwise the report would have been: "9/11-type attack highly unlikely considering current security measures." But that wasn't what it was. It was about Al-Qaeda's lack of organizational capability to carry out a complex terrorist attack. This shows that they were wrong. Again.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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Yes, but that wasn't the point of the CIA assessment, otherwise the report would have been: "9/11-type attack highly unlikely considering current security measures." But that wasn't what it was. It was about Al-Qaeda's lack of organizational capability to carry out a complex terrorist attack. This shows that they were wrong. Again.
One guy making one pair of bomb-underwear isn't a "complex terrorist attack".
 

mikeybot

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One guy making one pair of bomb-underwear isn't a "complex terrorist attack".
This.

The 9/11 style attack comment is likely to mean something along the lines of the amount of planning involved in placing 20 or so operatives in the country for an extended period of time, sending them to flight school and paying for them to take repeated flights to test security and have dry runs leading up to the actual attempts.

That takes a lot more organization than making a pair of undies that go boom.
 

Neon

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One guy making one pair of bomb-underwear isn't a "complex terrorist attack".
Wrong. Even if you assume that he did the actual bomb making by himself, someone had to recruit him. Someone had to train him in bomb making and other things, most likely somewhere like Yemen. In a camp full of other such people and equipment. Someone had to pay for all this and get the money to him - sleeper agents can't just go around buying bomb making materials with their credit card (the latest issue of AQAP's english-language magazine "Inspire" states this explicitly). Someone had to give him at least a minimal amount of guidance on where and when to strike (there are varying levels of independence, but activating a sleeper agent necessitates at least some measure of contact).

Now, whether this is all done via AQAP internet propaganda or via a human chain of command is irrelevant. The point is the organization still has the capability to take regular people and turn them into bomb-making suicide bombers intent on striking America. I'd hardly call that problem solved.

There is a big difference between an Andres Breivik, who was truly a lone-wolf type terrorist, and this. Note that the story repeatedly mentions AQAP the organization, rather than the person himself. They obviously think it was an organizational operation, as opposed to a zealous sympathizer.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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Wrong. Even if you assume that he did the actual bomb making by himself, someone had to recruit him. Someone had to train him in bomb making and other things, most likely somewhere like Yemen. In a camp full of other such people and equipment. Someone had to pay for all this and get the money to him - sleeper agents can't just go around buying bomb making materials with their credit card (the latest issue of AQAP's english-language magazine "Inspire" states this explicitly). Someone had to give him at least a minimal amount of guidance on where and when to strike (there are varying levels of independence, but activating a sleeper agent necessitates at least some measure of contact).

Now, whether this is all done via AQAP internet propaganda or via a human chain of command is irrelevant. The point is the organization still has the capability to take regular people and turn them into bomb-making suicide bombers intent on striking America. I'd hardly call that problem solved.
A bunch of ragheads working together in one shithole country to wire some explosives together into a pair of Jockey shorts doesn't frighten me to the level of having 20 hijackers allowed to freely roam and train in the United States while receiving financial and technical aid from agents in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Indonesia and Germany for over one year to prepare for a coordinated attack on a two major buildings. How do we know this guy was "recruited"? Might have been yet another disgruntled loner. And the instructions for the bomb could've been downloaded from the internet.

Look I get that you want to make it seem like we haven't made a dent in the fearsome Al Qaeda machine. It helps continue the narrative that we need to keep spending billions of dollars in the Middle East to wipe out every raghead. Fact is, a couple of dudes hiding out in Yemen doesn't approach the level of sophistication that we saw in the 9/11 attacks.
 

Neon

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That is absolutely not what I am saying, dummy. But the CIA should stop with their politically-worded speculation and focus on their fucking job, because apparently there is still much work to be done.

And I assume he was recruited because of how they are talking about it:

The official added that al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula was the group responsible for the plot.

"We believe AQAP produced the device, and we believe it was intended to be used by a suicide bomber on an aircraft," the official said. "The device and the plot are consistent with what we know about AQAP’s plans, intentions, and capabilities. They remain committed to striking targets in Yemen, Saudi Arabia, the Homeland, and Europe. And AQAP is probably feeling pressure to conduct a successful attack to, from their perspective, avenge the deaths of Bin Laden and (Anwar al-Awlaki).”
That doesn't sound like some loner to me. And regarding the sophistication - you have it all wrong. Organizations like AQAP are INTENTIONALLY shifting to things on a more simpler level precisely for that reason. They aren't planning 9/11-type attacks because they draw too much attention. They are working on the stuff that we aren't looking for. They haven't gotten there yet, but they are always trying. That's why including the 9/11 thing in that CIA analysis was a political smoke screen. They aren't even trying to carry out those types of things, and therefore mentioning it is just a way to pat themselves on the back for no real reason.
 

Neon

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Why the personal insults?
Really? I figured that by intentionally using little kiddie terms like "dummy" or "silly" it would be obvious that I wasn't attacking you (I would have said something like "asshole" or "fuckwad" or whatever if I was really angry). It's just the way my brain works, I guess. I need to have something in there, and writing "blah blah blah, Mayr" every time just gets kinda boring. Didn't mean anything by it.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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OK cool...just cuz you're wrong and I'm right, we don't need to get petty with each other :thumbsup:
 

Neon

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I recently listened to the Louis CK vs. Bill Donahue fight from O&A, and Louis called him a blockhead. It was on free FM and he struggled to find an insult on the spot and it was fucking hilarious (got line of the day). I just figure the really tame insults don't rise above the level of background noise here. In fact, it's gotten me into trouble IRL. We get aggressive here just for the sake of being aggressive. Sometimes I'll do that and the person in front of me will go "what the fuck just happened? I just told you I enjoyed the Phantom Menace and now you're yelling at me." Thanks, Wackbag!