Andre says 'Anything goes' on Philly streets

MJMANDALAY

Registered User
Jan 26, 2005
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#1
PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (CNN) -- On the streets of Philadelphia's toughest neighborhoods, just trying to get ahead can get you killed.

Andre, a 17 year-old from Philadelphia, has seen his brother shot and killed, and has been wanted for armed robbery.

"You got a good-looking girlfriend, you're going to get shot; someone wants her," said 17-year-old Andre, who asked his last name not be used for this article.
"If you're getting a little money, you're going to get shot -- someone wants that. Any way you look at it, it's just a bad situation."

Andre is caught up in the tough life on the streets of Philadelphia's Southside neighborhood. At 13, he watched his brother get shot and killed in front of his home by another teenager. By 15, he was wanted for two counts of armed robbery and theft.

"It makes you feel stronger, powerful, a bigger man," he said of having a gun. "You even walk differently when you have a gun on you."

He and others like him are the new face of violence in Philadelphia -- a younger, harder generation that lives and dies by the gun. Though it's spread throughout the city, the problem of youth violence is most acute in the southern, southwestern and northern parts.

Over the past couple of years, Philadelphia's murder rate reached highs not seen since the 1980s, according to the Philadelphia Police Department. So far this year, more than 315 people have been killed, a pace of well over a murder a day, police said. In fact, more people have been murdered so far this year in Philadelphia than in much larger cities like Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; and New York.

But Philadelphia's situation is different today from years past in that more and more of the killers are teenagers, according to the Philadelphia Police Department and the Philadelphia District Attorney's office.

"They just shoot at anything and everybody, without even looking," said Shawn Banks, a former drug dealer and gang member. Now in his 30s, he said the new generation that rules the streets is made up of kids who shoot first and never consider the consequences.

"They [are] not respecting themselves and they don't have any value for human life," he said.

Nineteen percent of those held at Philadelphia's overcrowded juvenile detention center, The Youth Study Center, are guilty of committing violent crimes. This is in addition to those juveniles serving time at a nearby adult facility for more serious violent crimes like murder. Nearly one in four juveniles at the center become repeat offenders.

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Staff members at the youth facility said whenever a teenager makes headlines, chances are it's someone they know.

Helping kids at the center can be difficult, according to some.

"Maybe they're here for 9 -12 months, but if they spent 13 years in an environment that maybe isn't good and has a bad influence on them, you're going to lean on those 13 years," said counselor Nelson Walker.

But the office of Philadelphia Mayor John Street said the city works hard to reach high-risk kids.

"We are not going to deny that we have a problem here," said Joe Grace, spokesman for the mayor's office. "And we work aggressively to work with young kids who we consider high risk."

Grace touts the Philadelphia anti-violence, anti-drug program, which targets kids who have been through the justice system and are on probation. The city tries to help them avoid becoming repeat offenders.

As a caseworker meeting on a daily basis with juvenile offenders, Shondell Revell knows what the streets can do to a young person.

"These kids are hard, because their neighborhoods are hard," he said. "They don't see the other side of life."

Reaching out to younger siblings of juvenile criminals is particularly important to stopping the cycle of violence, said Revell.

But Andre says the pull of violent street life is strong and that offenders often end up going back to the life they knew in order to survive.


"Shooting, stabbing, killing, whatever it is -- whatever you gotta do to survive," he said.

"Anything goes -- anything"





Andre------>
 
Nov 29, 2006
3,452
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FL
#3
PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (CNN) -- On the streets of Philadelphia's toughest neighborhoods, just trying to get ahead can get you killed.

Andre, a 17 year-old from Philadelphia, has seen his brother shot and killed, [highlight]and has been wanted for armed robbery.[/highlight]

"You got a good-looking girlfriend, you're going to get shot; someone wants her," said 17-year-old Andre, who asked his last name not be used for this article.
"If you're getting a little money, you're going to get shot -- someone wants that. Any way you look at it, it's just a bad situation."

Andre is caught up in the tough life on the streets of Philadelphia's Southside neighborhood. At 13, he watched his brother get shot and killed in front of his home by another teenager. [highlight]By 15, he was wanted for two counts of armed robbery and theft.[/highlight]
--snipped--
Is he no longer wanted for these crimes? Was he acquitted, or eliminated as a suspect? Or did they just give up looking for him? I wish they would clarify things like this. It doesn't really change the story, but if they're going to say he was wanted, they should at least provide some details as to why he's not wanted any longer.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
46,674
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#4
It's a reflection of their lack of cultural values. Pull yourselves up by taking out the trash. That means calling the cops and following through on the complaint all the way to conviction. It also means throwing Fat Al and Jessie under a bus and exposing them for the frauds they are by not addressing black on black crime.
 
Nov 29, 2006
3,452
374
523
FL
#5
It's a reflection of their lack of cultural values. Pull yourselves up by taking out the trash. That means calling the cops and following through on the complaint all the way to conviction. It also means throwing Fat Al and Jessie under a bus and exposing them for the frauds they are by not addressing black on black crime.
If the blacks don't give a shit about black on black crime, then why should we. It's the black on white crime that concerns me.
 

abudabit

New Wackbag
Oct 10, 2004
14,802
0
0
#6
All Philly needs is for that number to increase 100 times for a few years and crime will suddenly disapear.
 

blazin

Registered User
Dec 9, 2004
3,873
416
578
#11
Where is Southside Philly?
 

Butter Nuggets

Registered User
May 29, 2006
275
0
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#12
Is he no longer wanted for these crimes? Was he acquitted, or eliminated as a suspect? Or did they just give up looking for him? I wish they would clarify things like this. It doesn't really change the story, but if they're going to say he was wanted, they should at least provide some details as to why he's not wanted any longer.
It was a case of mistaken identity according to this documentary I saw. On the playground was where he spent most of his days. He was just shootin some b-ball outside of the school when a couple of guys who were up to no good
Startin makin trouble in his neighborhood. He only got in one lil fight.
 

cozzie

head retard
Aug 7, 2005
1,482
1
176
Norristown PA
#13
I wish Andre would go back to wrestling and quit being a problem in the black neighborhood.
 

Zona992006

New Wackbag
Jan 26, 2007
4,129
1
0
#14
It's a reflection of their lack of cultural values. Pull yourselves up by taking out the trash. That means calling the cops and following through on the complaint all the way to conviction. It also means throwing Fat Al and Jessie under a bus and exposing them for the frauds they are by not addressing black on black crime.

Like the Isaah thing? not really a crime but a black on black issue non the less.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
46,674
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#15
Like the Isaah thing? not really a crime but a black on black issue non the less.
The reason Isiah didn't have to pay any money is because James Dolan is an self-centered douche who fired her after she made a legitimate complaint. It wasn't the words, but the actions of the employer that caused the pay out.
 

Zona992006

New Wackbag
Jan 26, 2007
4,129
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#16
The reason Isiah didn't have to pay any money is because James Dolan is an self-centered douche who fired her after she made a legitimate complaint. It wasn't the words, but the actions of the employer that caused the pay out.
I know but to the un informed, it is Sharpton going after Isaah.

What happened to her was wrong. She made a complaint and was fired for it. This was no skeezer or ho or whatever. She was a 250k a year executive who got fired for going against the old boy network.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
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#19
I know but to the un informed, it is Sharpton going after Isaah.

What happened to her was wrong. She made a complaint and was fired for it. This was no skeezer or ho or whatever. She was a 250k a year executive who got fired for going against the old boy network.
Whoopi on the View called for Al to apologize to the Duke Lacrosse players. I don't see that happening anytime soon.
 

Zona992006

New Wackbag
Jan 26, 2007
4,129
1
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#20
Whoopi on the View called for Al to apologize to the Duke Lacrosse players. I don't see that happening anytime soon.
I saw. Once again those black on black issues being thrown in our faces. Damn Savages.
 

Zona992006

New Wackbag
Jan 26, 2007
4,129
1
0
#22
Is Whoopi really black? She does have a Jewish surname. "whaa"
Good question. Well, if you bought her home, do you think your family would say, "hey nice Jewish girl" or "WtF, another schwooogie"?
 

Creampier

I have to return some videotapes!
May 11, 2007
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Somerville, NJ
#23
It was a case of mistaken identity according to this documentary I saw. On the playground was where he spent most of his days. He was just shootin some b-ball outside of the school when a couple of guys who were up to no good
Startin makin trouble in his neighborhood. He only got in one lil fight.
:haha7::haha7::haha7::haha7:
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
46,674
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#24
Good question. Well, if you bought her home, do you think your family would say, "hey nice Jewish girl" or "WtF, another schwooogie"?

They wouldn't bitch about her color or religion, but the age difference would be a problem.
 
Dec 25, 2005
10,005
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NJ
#25
if that environment has existed for 13 years, then something should have began to happen to stop it 10 years ago.. I know that's much easier said than done; bur I just hate the way these articles are worded.

Like they're surprised or something??