Any cable TV guys out there?

blazin

Registered User
Dec 9, 2004
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#1
Today some hack from the cable company came to install new service in my neighbors apartment.

He basically disconnected my cable and hooked the feed line to the neighbors splitter, leaving me with nothing.

So i went outside and rehooked my line up and everything was fine.

I left for a few hours and came back to see the lines were changed outside again.

Basically there seems to be one line coming to the house from the pole. I got a 3 way splitter, hooked the feed into the 'IN", 2 out's going to my apartment, and the 3rd line goes to another 2 way splitter which feeds my nieghbors two lines to their apt.

question is, is this ok? Even though its one line coming in, can it split to each of our apts and have our seperate accounts? Or are we 'sharing' cable?

A tech will be here on Tuesday to check it out, but in the meantime I want to know if what I did is correct.
 

jackjack

Registered User
May 12, 2007
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Daytona Beach
#2
Even though its one line coming in, can it split to each of our apts and have our seperate accounts? Or are we 'sharing' cable?
If they are billing you and your neighbor, there's no problem.
Everyone is sharing the same cable.
 
Dec 25, 2005
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NJ
#3
if the picture looks ok for all, then you're good. I've ripped them off like that before. Ahh I miss the days of simply removing blockers for pay services.
 

blazin

Registered User
Dec 9, 2004
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#4
Thats what I thought, I was mostly concerned about the internet. That needs to be seperate for reasons of legality, privacy, etc. I suppose thats what the MAC address is for on the modem.
 
Dec 25, 2005
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NJ
#6
Thats what I thought, I was mostly concerned about the internet. That needs to be seperate for reasons of legality, privacy, etc. I suppose thats what the MAC address is for on the modem.
If they see rouge IDs, they may shut you down. However, if you/they are a paying customer I think you'll be fine.

You have to make sure that your splitters will handle the frequency range (most will, but the cheap ones sometimes don't) and they have to handle two way communication just like your digital cable box (if you have one). Just don't buy those cheap ass splitters they hav in Target.. the RCA brand are probably the best and easiest to find. There much are better out there as well.

In any case, you ought to be fine until Tuesday when the 'tech' comes to sort everything out. The 1st tech will get some shit for the return call.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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#7
Cable is at it's heart a shared broadcast medium. Splitting coax is how it's designed.
 

weeniewawa

it's a man, baby!!!
May 21, 2005
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#8
Thats what I thought, I was mostly concerned about the internet. That needs to be seperate for reasons of legality, privacy, etc. I suppose thats what the MAC address is for on the modem.
this is where the ISPs make you think one is better than the other, all internet is shared at one point or another or else it wouldn't be a network. DSL always says "with cable you are sharing the connection with your neighbors". that is their way of selling their slower connection.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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Covington. La
#9
this is where the ISPs make you think one is better than the other, all internet is shared at one point or another or else it wouldn't be a network. DSL always says "with cable you are sharing the connection with your neighbors". that is their way of selling their slower connection.
DSL is private back to the node. Cable is shared back to the node. Better traffic management and engineering that way.
 

BCH

Doesn't need your acknowledgement on Twitter
Wackbag Staff
Jun 9, 2005
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New York
#10
this is where the ISPs make you think one is better than the other, all internet is shared at one point or another or else it wouldn't be a network. DSL always says "with cable you are sharing the connection with your neighbors". that is their way of selling their slower connection.
I don't know about that Tim, my fios connection runs at 20 Mbps 24/7. I can test it at any time of the day or night and there it is, 20 Megabits. At my dad's house (a few blocks away) his cable connection has trouble getting out of it's own way (2 or 3 Mbps) during the evenings when the kiddies are all downloading the latest yellowcard album but runs closer to 10Mbps on a Sunday morning when nobody's awake yet.

There must be something to the notion of a shared cable versus a private fiber.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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Covington. La
#11
I don't know about that Tim, my fios connection runs at 20 Mbps 24/7. I can test it at any time of the day or night and there it is, 20 Megabits. At my dad's house (a few blocks away) his cable connection has trouble getting out of it's own way (2 or 3 Mbps) during the evenings when the kiddies are all downloading the latest yellowcard album but runs closer to 10Mbps on a Sunday morning when nobody's awake yet.

There must be something to the notion of a shared cable versus a private fiber.
Technically PON is closer in architecture to cable than it is to telephone. PON has all the optical nodes multiplexing back across the same path (PON supports 8-32 users). They grab the bandwidth they need on the fly. It's just a shitload of bandwidth. Cable just suffers in that node management is more engineering intensive. If the engineer tries to skimp and not plan for the traffic volume it can get more easily overwhelmed than DSL or PON IMO.
 

BCH

Doesn't need your acknowledgement on Twitter
Wackbag Staff
Jun 9, 2005
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#12
I'm assuming PON stands for Passive Optical Network? Due to the use of wavelength division multiplexing?

Wait, I can google it!

Yes it does.

Um, yeah the main fibers as I understand it are ridiculous capacity-wise and the 30 to 50 megabits they're giving customer's right now doesn't even have them breaking a sweat. That coupled with the fact that only 32 customers can be connected results in a theoretical maximum bandwidth which can be easily planned for.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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Covington. La
#13
I'm assuming PON stands for Passive Optical Network? Due to the use of wavelength division multiplexing?
Yup. PON uses WDM for 3 sets of wavelengths. The 3rd they use to broadcast television which gets dropped back to an RF overlay at the NID. The standard BPON that Verizon uses is 622Mb/s divided by up to 32 users. With such a large download speed divided by such a small userbase it's easy to engineer the speeds.

Cable can have hundreds of users easy per node. DSL will have from 4-216 users per node. The largest DSLAM I know of is the Alcatel 7300 which is designed to host 216 lines of ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+(up to 24Mb/s per line) with a standard DS-3 backhaul (optional gigabit ethernet). The next one down is the Alcatel 7330 which is designed to host 192 lines of ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+/VDSL/VDSL2 with a standard gigabit backhaul. Now that one's capable of 100Mb/s easy.

On the small side for DSLAM's there's the mini-RAM which is a 4 port T-1 backed ADSL only DSLAM. Or if you're on fiber to the curb there's the MX system which allows 4-12 lines with the same capability of the 7330 though with VDSL2 you can easily get 200Mb/s per line since the distance from the system is rarely over 1kft.

They're installing a 7330 right around my corner right now for what I'm almost certain will be a Uverse roll-out over here sometime next year.
 
Dec 25, 2005
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NJ
#14
So.. let's get back to his question; if he split the connection and added more users would it be an issue?
 
Dec 25, 2005
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NJ
#16
I thought so.. just curious if you had any to add. :) thx.