Anyone Taken the LSAT?

krisko

Mrs. Fuckin Funny
Jul 29, 2005
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#1
I'm wondering if anyone has taken the LSAT? I'm taking it in September and I need some study tips or advice of any sort. Any help would be great, thank :action-sm
 

Fresca

Registered User
Mar 27, 2005
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#2
You came to the wrong board...:action-sm
 
Feb 3, 2006
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Pennsylvania
#3
It's been about 20 years but the best thing to do is take as many practice test as possible. You be amazed how better you do over time.
 

Simby19

I want to have L'il Jimmy's babies
Aug 10, 2006
8,458
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Paramus, NJ
#4
I'm in the middle of a Princeton Review class for my GMATs. I just practice my ass off and my scores seem to be improving. Obviously it's not the same test, but still I think just getting some books and working out every problem over and over again helps.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#5
I didn't do any review classes despite being told to. I just bought a bunch of the books and solely worked from there and on those. I did decent. Now I'm a middling law student regretting my choice but with no other viable options.
 
Feb 3, 2006
826
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#6
I didn't do any review classes despite being told to. I just bought a bunch of the books and solely worked from there and on those. I did decent. Now I'm a middling law student regretting my choice but with no other viable options.

That's why they teach as they do in law schools. If we could do anything else, we would.
 

Hobbes

Registered User
Feb 22, 2005
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#7
I took them back in 2001. I took a Kaplan review course and to me it was a waste of money. I took them again in 2002 because I wasn't happy with my 2001 score and by just working through the Kaplan books I had and doing some practice tests, my score went up.

So much for the actual classroom teaching. The review courses teach you how to take the test, not the material on it because as I'm sure you have seen with the practice tests, the subject matter is not the important part, it's the reading comprehension, yadda yadda yadda.

I took the GMAT also in 2006 and just worked from the Kaplan type books you can buy at any bookstore and took practice tests. I felt more comfortable going into the GMAT than I did going into the LSATs because I guess I was able to work at my own pace and concentrate on what I knew were my weak points and strong points.

Good luck with the test. Also do the practice tests within the alotted time you will have on the test.
 

krisko

Mrs. Fuckin Funny
Jul 29, 2005
28,300
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191
Cupcake Capital, USA
#8
I didn't do any review classes despite being told to. I just bought a bunch of the books and solely worked from there and on those. I did decent. Now I'm a middling law student regretting my choice but with no other viable options.
ya someone told me to take one of those classes but they are like a grand and i'm only taking the LSAT to see if i'm good at it. i'm a double major in english literature and political science so i figure law school or grad school are about my only options after i get out. although my neanderthal boyfriend wants me to stay home with the kids so why waste another 4 years if i'm going to be barefoot and pregnant :arrrh:

edit: these kids aren't actually here yet, they are future kids
 

FMDoug

Registered User
Nov 29, 2005
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#9
I didn't do any review classes despite being told to. I just bought a bunch of the books and solely worked from there and on those. I did decent. Now I'm a middling law student regretting my choice but with no other viable options.
That's about right for me, minus the whole regretting part.

It all depends how you want to learn. If you want to sit in the class with other people then take a class, if you want to learn by yourself, buy a book. Whatever you do, the key is practice, practice, practice. Don't just think you will do well. If you do that the test will fuck you up.

I thought i was better than that and didn't practice, took it, sucked up the room, and ended up at an eh school. However, I picked myself up by the bootstraps and worked really hard this past year. I am now going to transfer to a way way better school. Take it from me. PRACTICE.
 

Simby19

I want to have L'il Jimmy's babies
Aug 10, 2006
8,458
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Paramus, NJ
#10
The class is helpful if you do the work at home. Obviously it's RIDICULOUSLY expensive but my score on the GMATs is improving, so I can't complain that much. They offer a lot of extra help if you have problems, too. I haven't taken my teacher up on that, for he is creepy. But it's good to know it's there.
 

ChrisH

Waddle Doodle
Jun 11, 2004
2,358
0
0
Brooklyn, NY
#12
A course (Kaplan, Princeton Review) is best, but as noted, expensive. Definitely invest in a few volumes of practice tests, and do them over and over again, the logic games in particular.

HOWEVER,

Before you go to law school, MAKE SURE YOU KNOW THE REALITY OF PRACTICING LAW AND THE DEBT/REALISTIC JOB PROSPECTS AFTER GRADUATION!!!! PM me for the entire spiel.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#13
That's about right for me, minus the whole regretting part.
The reason I regret it mostly is because I still feel, aimless, driftless with little to no career prospects and unsure of my abilities/skills/knowledge, my inability to have that inherent love/oneness of/with law that I feel you must have if you ever want to be a success in your chosen field (I majored in journalism/media/politics and got fantastic grades because they were all stuff that just were part of my interests), my inability maneuver in the legal world and how I'm retarded at networking. And of course the tons upon tons of loans. But I only just finished my first year (night year at that) + summer courses and am switching to full time next year so maybe I'll direct myself at that. Right now even practicing sees like a stupid idea and I hope to use my degree into some non-practicing field.

However, my own self doubt makes me regret a lot of things and hate a lot of things about myself. Overall, long run, big picture, I do not regret it because if I didn't do this, I'd probably be stuck data processing for the next 20 years and I don't really know how long I'd be able to take that. And I know in the long run my degree will hopefully, possibly, probably, help me.
 

FMDoug

Registered User
Nov 29, 2005
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#15
The reason I regret it mostly is because I still feel, aimless, driftless with little to no career prospects and unsure of my abilities/skills/knowledge, my inability to have that inherent love/oneness of/with law that I feel you must have if you ever want to be a success in your chosen field (I majored in journalism/media/politics and got fantastic grades because they were all stuff that just were part of my interests), my inability maneuver in the legal world and how I'm retarded at networking. And of course the tons upon tons of loans. But I only just finished my first year (night year at that) + summer courses and am switching to full time next year so maybe I'll direct myself at that. Right now even practicing sees like a stupid idea and I hope to use my degree into some non-practicing field.

However, my own self doubt makes me regret a lot of things and hate a lot of things about myself. Overall, long run, big picture, I do not regret it because if I didn't do this, I'd probably be stuck data processing for the next 20 years and I don't really know how long I'd be able to take that. And I know in the long run my degree will hopefully, possibly, probably, help me.
I came into law school after a year off and I wasn't sure I wanted to be a lawyer. I only knew I wanted to do well and transfer to prove to myself that I was smarter than the LSATs. Like i said before, I worked my ass off and got a 3.25 (which is really good at my school, I'm top 10 percent - not to brag) and have been accepted to some top schools. This whole process gave me a respect for the profession/law and now actually like it.

It was probably stupid of me to come to law school not knowing if i wanted to be a lawyer. The loans would accumulate and I would have to pay them off for years to come in a job I hated. Thank god that isn't the case. The first year really gave me a genuine thirst to learn more about the law.

I too didn't want to process anything. I don't want someone setting the hours for me to sit at a desk and type and type. I like the prospect of doing what I feel i need to in order to make a buck. The only problem I have at this point is figuring out the type of law I want to get into. I'm pretty sure I don't want to work at a large firm making a shitload of money for working 8-10 6 days a week. That is not a life. It would be nice to make 110 like that for a year, but anything past would drive me insane.... I'm rambling...

I'll just finish up by saying that the only way to do well and pass the bar is the drive to be a lawyer (or being insanely smart). Without the drive you end up fading into a C grade or probably failing out. So before you take the LSATs, make sure law is what you want to do, otherwise you just wasted 25k or more.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#16
The first year really gave me a genuine thirst to learn more about the law.
Agreed. I actually find it fun reading and learning about it. Unfortunately my drive/motivation has always been low. I have never trusted my abilities. And there's the entire "where am I headed towards future" thing which freaks me out.

The only problem I have at this point is figuring out the type of law I want to get into.
I don't know what field I want to get into either. Of the few classes I've taken, criminal law and that entire field seems by far the most fun and interesting. But, again, it's not something I can trust myself to pull off.

The entertainment industry is another field that intrigues me but all the entertainment courses and a lot of entertainment law seems based on intellectual property and I've worked for IP firms and from the little I've seen of it, it seems so...lame. "Oooo that A looks similar to our A."

And then if I don't want to practice but want to use my degree towards some sort of executie/"suit" position in any type of field, I don't know if I can go to my career services and tell them that or if they'd be able to help me. And the worst thing I can be told is "you should go to business school then" because I already put my life in turmoil for law school as it is. And law school always fascinated me more than business school.
 

FMDoug

Registered User
Nov 29, 2005
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#18
I love criminal law. I think it was my professor who made it really interesting for us. BUT, I don't see myself in court for the rest of my life. I don't think i trust myself defending the state or the criminal. There is too much responsibility and pressure that comes with that. For the state, you need to have a good record to stay on and advance. For the criminal, it's just morally wrong. I would never defend someone who is a blatent criminal. It's my own morality thing.

I looked into intellectual property too. You really need to have a specialty when you do that. Let's say its medicine, you need to basically be a dr and a lawyer. its too much.

I'm leaning more towards tax, although that means MORE school. I'm also leaning towards property - maybe estates. The baby boomers are retiring and they will need someone to set up their wills.

I'd love to be an entertainment lawyer and rep big stars. It seems fun and I've had experience dealing in this field. (I brought norton to my college and basically handled all the contract crap) The only problem is that you need really good connections or always be in clubs and on sets to find that next big star.

For every good job comes one thing I hate about it. Like you, I don't think I can go to an advisor because they don't really know me from a hole in the wall. I'd much prefer to speak to people in the fields I want to practice in. My only hope is that I know someone and they just offer me a job or internship next summer. My school offered me this but it's not the right time or place for me to accept (plus i'm leaving here).

Here is my reality. I'm going to graduate, hopefully pass the bar, and then get interviews. the first job that accepts me is the one i will take. Either that or i will get a few of my friends and we will start up our own practice.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#19
I love criminal law. I think it was my professor who made it really interesting for us. BUT, I don't see myself in court for the rest of my life. I don't think i trust myself defending the state or the criminal. There is too much responsibility and pressure that comes with that. For the state, you need to have a good record to stay on and advance. For the criminal, it's just morally wrong. I would never defend someone who is a blatent criminal. It's my own morality thing.
It's strange. I can easily seeing myself defending the criminal more than I can defending the state. I usually side with the criminal in the short stories we read (I see cases as short stories with a lesson at the end) and have this strange empathy towards them. The more horrific the crime, the more curious I am of the perpetrator and the more curious I am the more I like the person. And on a more evil side, I like the idea of contributing to the downfall of society. I find it more morally wrong on the state to go after someone for a petty drug crime than I do defending a criminal. But I'm weird.

And then again, you have to be good at what you do, it doesn't pay much at first, you still need connections. And I can't see myself as a "brilliant criminal defense attorney" and I don't want to be stuck working for the state (in either capacity) my career. And I just know my client would lose based on how I carry myself. And yes, the idea of lives being changed because of you- you pudgy, insignificant, insecure, self-hating self- is kind of scary. And it doesn't pay that well.

I looked into intellectual property too. You really need to have a specialty when you do that. Let's say its medicine, you need to basically be a dr and a lawyer. its too much.
It is. And if I get into the entertainment field, I don't want that to be my livelihood.

I'm leaning more towards tax, although that means MORE school. I'm also leaning towards property - maybe estates. The baby boomers are retiring and they will need someone to set up their wills.
With tax, I don't really like numbers. I like theories and ideas and abstract proposals, that intrigues me a lot more.

[qiuote]I'd love to be an entertainment lawyer and rep big stars. It seems fun and I've had experience dealing in this field. (I brought norton to my college and basically handled all the contract crap) The only problem is that you need really good connections or always be in clubs and on sets to find that next big star. [/quote] Yeah, that's another thing. I have no connections, I don't go to clubs, I don't know anybody. The worst is the entire Type A personality. I don't have that. I'm generally meek and unassertive (thanks for instilling that in me parents) and a field like that-and so many others- really do seem to require someone a lot stronger than I can be. I think I'd be a really good toady though.

Like you, I don't think I can go to an advisor because they don't really know me from a hole in the wall.
See I don't care if they don't know me, I know they don't know me, I know nobody will ever know my name. I just don't want to see them and have them act like "If you don't want to practice, why are you in law school?" or "Well we don't have any jobs that could get you an in in a [marketing firm, pr firm, tv network, news agency, whatever] but how about docketing for a family law attorney?"
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
144,460
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#20
I love criminal law. I think it was my professor who made it really interesting for us. BUT, I don't see myself in court for the rest of my life. I don't think i trust myself defending the state or the criminal. There is too much responsibility and pressure that comes with that. For the state, you need to have a good record to stay on and advance. For the criminal, it's just morally wrong. I would never defend someone who is a blatent criminal. It's my own morality thing.
It's strange. I can easily seeing myself defending the criminal more than I can defending the state. I usually side with the criminal in the short stories we read (I see cases as short stories with a lesson at the end) and have this strange empathy towards them. The more horrific the crime, the more curious I am of the perpetrator and the more curious I am the more I like the person. And on a more evil side, I like the idea of contributing to the downfall of society. I find it more morally wrong on the state to go after someone for a petty drug crime than I do defending a criminal. But I'm weird.

And then again, you have to be good at what you do, it doesn't pay much at first, you still need connections. And I can't see myself as a "brilliant criminal defense attorney" and I don't want to be stuck working for the state (in either capacity) my career. And I just know my client would lose based on how I carry myself. And yes, the idea of lives being changed because of you- you pudgy, insignificant, insecure, self-hating self- is kind of scary. And it doesn't pay that well.

I looked into intellectual property too. You really need to have a specialty when you do that. Let's say its medicine, you need to basically be a dr and a lawyer. its too much.
It is. And if I get into the entertainment field, I don't want that to be my livelihood.

I'm leaning more towards tax, although that means MORE school. I'm also leaning towards property - maybe estates. The baby boomers are retiring and they will need someone to set up their wills.
With tax, I don't really like numbers. I like theories and ideas and abstract proposals, that intrigues me a lot more.

I'd love to be an entertainment lawyer and rep big stars. It seems fun and I've had experience dealing in this field. (I brought norton to my college and basically handled all the contract crap) The only problem is that you need really good connections or always be in clubs and on sets to find that next big star.
Yeah, that's another thing. I have no connections, I don't go to clubs, I don't know anybody. The worst is the entire Type A personality. I don't have that. I'm generally meek and unassertive (thanks for instilling that in me parents) and a field like that-and so many others- really do seem to require someone a lot stronger than I can be.

Like you, I don't think I can go to an advisor because they don't really know me from a hole in the wall.
See I don't care if they don't know me, I know they don't know me, I know nobody will ever know my name. I just don't want to see them and have them act like "If you don't want to practice, why are you in law school?" or "Well we don't have any jobs that could get you an in in a [marketing firm, pr firm, tv network, news agency, whatever] but how about docketing for a family law attorney?"
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
144,460
51,091
644
#22
fucking lawyers are long winded :action-sm
Just a warning. From my experience, law school students are among the dullest you'll ever meet.