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Best Method For Repairing PVC Pipe

Discussion in 'Wackbag Home Improvement & Car Repair' started by Begbie, Jul 4, 2011.

  1. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    I've got a few nail holes in a PVC drain pipe from the master bathroom upstairs...in the wall in my living room downstairs. The wife and I noticed this section of wet drywall tonight. And as I cut the damaged drywall out...I'm up to about a 2ft X 2ft square, and I'll probably need to cut more out tomorrow. I removed the real mushy section, but there are two sides that still feel a little damp. The hole came from a picture she hung when we moved in 6 years ago. We moved the picture about 6 months ago and removed the nail. That's probably when it started leaking. Really nasty, and I actually noticed another three smaller holes in the same area of the pipe.

    I need to find the best way to plug these holes up. I've read that the best solution is to cut the bad section out and get a new piece and use a coupling...BUT, the pipe is already wedged in the wall tightly and the new drywall won't lay flush if I put a coupling on there. There's also epoxy...but does that really work? I mean, there aren't many options besides ripping the entire wall out and replacing most of the pipe, but I also don't want to have to repeat this same process in 5 years again. Anyone know what I should do or what I should buy?
     
  2. Digital_Trauma

    Digital_Trauma "man of leisure". . . aaaand repeat

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    Epoxy should work fine for a drain since it isn't under any pressure. Just make sure to clean well before applying.
     
  3. the Streif

    the Streif ¡¡¡¡sıʞunɹɹɹɹɹɹɹℲ
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    If, and only if it is a NON-PRESSURIZED pipe, what you can do is get a self tapping screw with the little rubber washer under the head and screw that right into the nail hole and it should seal up. DO NOT DO THIS ON A PIPE THAT IS PRESSURIZED!!!!!!!!! It will work on a Sch. 40 drain pipe no problem. The only problem with this solution is that you now have a screw sticking into the pipe and it will eventually clog up right there after a few years of crap getting lodged on it. Other than that, you are cutting and coupling a new piece in.

    Also, pics of your wifes tits and the damaged area might help. Tits or GTFO!
     
  4. maz

    maz TRueWDTer

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    Put the nails back In for now

    Maybe with some sort of glue on them
     
  5. maz

    maz TRueWDTer

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    And cut them off short like Chia said

    Just need to plug the leaks and Not obstruct
     
  6. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    Gotcha thanks! Yeah, I don't think it's pressurized, and I always thought about plugging it up with a couple self-tapping screws, but then again, I'd hate to risk cracking the pipe. But certainly cutting the screws down a bit would help prevent crap from building up on it from the inside.

    As for cutting it out and putting a coupling in, I just know the coupling will make it bulge out a bit...and therefore my drywall won't lay flush with the studs. So "plugging" it is really my only option...unless I really want to go crazy and remove the entire drywall from floor to ceiling and replace a huge section of pipe.
     
  7. maz

    maz TRueWDTer

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    Eh
    You could probably get some kind of rubber sleeve and clamps
    If the holes are pretty close together

    But to get you thru till then
    Cut off nails/Screws and glue should suffice

    It's only a drain line
    No pressure in there
     
  8. Party Rooster

    Party Rooster Unleash The Beast

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    I think their last kid was C-section so I think she's ok. :icon_cool

    Get one of these after you patch it up. You won't be able to change the batteries but if it lasts a year I'd imagine it'll be good for awhile.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004XOVI/?tag=wackbagcom-20

    Edit:
    Scratch that last idea. The thing makes an annoying beep like a smoke detector when it's low on batteries, so unless you can drop it near a wall outlet hole to be able to get it out you'll have to put up with a week or two of chirping.
     
  9. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    Sounds good. The holes are about 4 inches apart, so its not too far apart. I may be able to do something like that at some point.
     
  10. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    Yeah, the leak is in the wall itself, I would never be able to get that thing back out. And the beeping would drive me nuts.

    It does look like I've got more drywall to cut out though. It wasn't moldy, but it definitely smelled like mildew. I'll probably cut an extra inch of drywall out, just to be safe. The insulation appears to be ok though.

    Oh and, both kids came out via c-section, but they were also 9 and 10 pounders, so she got abused pretty badly. Poor, poor girl. :icon_cool
     
  11. Party Rooster

    Party Rooster Unleash The Beast

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    There's a spray you have to buy to keep it from going bad. In my last house I had a pipe burst in the second story and when the people that the insurance company hired came out to fix it they sprayed several cans of it up in my ceiling, even though it was supposedly thoroughly dried out after 2 days of fans and another few days after that. With young kids around you want to make sure you nip that in the bud, you'll end up giving them allergies or even asthma.
     
  12. Turfmower

    Turfmower Registered User

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    Just cut out the bad section of pipe and replace it. you could have done that in the time you spent posting here. You don't want to open up the wall to fix some half asses repair in 6 months.
     
  13. Dikbag

    Dikbag Registered User

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  14. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    I'll look into that...and yeah, I'll probably be cutting out more than I should, just to be safe. I'll just have to order some more of that Chinese drywall to replace the hole. ;) :action-sm

    I think you missed this part...

    Couplings are going to fit over the existing pipe...making that section buldgier and drywall won't lay flush with the studs.
     
  15. Begbie

    Begbie Wackbag Generalissimo

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    Problem solved! Fix it..........and forget it!
     
  16. MrAbovePar

    MrAbovePar En Taro Anthony

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    Since you've got this solved already I'll just let this be said for future use.

    Carlon makes repair couplings that IIRC were designed to fit inside the pipe.
     
  17. stevethrower

    stevethrower Got Sig?

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    I gather you cannot fit a Fernco fitting in:

    [​IMG]

    Do you have room for a MJ/No Hub connector?

    [​IMG]
     
  18. the Streif

    the Streif ¡¡¡¡sıʞunɹɹɹɹɹɹɹℲ
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    I was going to suggest something along the lines of this in my original post but if a DWV coupler is too thick to put on the pipe inside the wall without the drywall bulging, then he'll have the same problem with one of those. IIRC a 4" DWV coupler has about a .25" wall thickness so he'd be adding a total of .5" total diameter to the pipe after installation.

    Might also want to look at using a Morris bolted pipe repair coupler. http://www.morriscoupling.com/prod1.html
     
  19. OilyJillFart

    OilyJillFart Well-Lubed Member

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    Scuff up the area around the hole and fill with JB Weld.
    Alternately, cut a piece of PVC to fit around the pipe and glue with PVC glue. It will be as good as any joint.
    In either case, if you want additional peace of mind, add a hose clamp around the pipe.
    Easy, cheap, and will last as long as the other joints in the pipe.
     
  20. maz

    maz TRueWDTer

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    HMMM

    My main sewer drain in the basement has been Peeling/Flaking off for a few years
    That Morris coupling might be a nice temp fix for that

    bad section is maybe a couple feet long on a 6 or 8 inch pipe

    Thanks for the link

    Bookmarked
     
  21. the Streif

    the Streif ¡¡¡¡sıʞunɹɹɹɹɹɹɹℲ
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    We use those Morris couplers for almost all our aluminum tube and stainless pipe. They hold incredibly well if you tighten the bolts properly.
     

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