'Bomb cyclone' snow, wind making travel dangerous in parts of the Midwest

Bobobie

Registered User
#1
"Grab the kids and run to the Root Cellar!!! We're having a Bomb Cyclone!! Never heard of it, guess it's some kind of Tornator!"






Bomb cyclone' snow, wind making travel dangerous in parts of the Midwest
Traffic backs up along 56th Avenue as a spring storm rolls in before the evening rush hour Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Denver.
(David Zalubowski / AP)
Blake NicholsonAssociated Press

A storm system known as a "bomb cyclone" slowly churned through the U.S. interior Thursday for the second time in a month, unleashing a blizzard in parts of the Midwest while creating hazardous fire conditions farther south.
As much as 18 inches of snow has fallen in parts of South Dakota, where Gov. Kristi Noem has closed state offices in much of the state for a second day as heavy snow and strong winds make travel conditions dangerous.

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Whiteout conditions were reported in western Nebraska, where the Department of Transportation closed several highways Thursday morning. Schools in Minneapolis and St. Paul were among hundreds that closed in Minnesota, where as much as 2 feet (0.61 meters) of snow is expected by Friday.
The Minnesota State Patrol said it has responded to more 200 crashes statewide since Wednesday.

The storm knocked out power Wednesday to thousands of homes and businesses in South Dakota, disrupted air and ground travel from Colorado to Minnesota, and threatened to swell rivers in the Midwest that flooded after March's drenching.
Both storms are known as a "bomb cyclone," a weather phenomenon that entails a rapid drop in air pressure and a storm strengthening explosively, according to David Roth, a forecaster at the National Weather Service's Weather Prediction Center in Maryland.
The latest storm's impacts are likely to be similar to last month's storm, Roth said. That blast dropped heavy snow and led to massive flooding in the Midwest that caused billions of dollars in damage in Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa and South Dakota.
"Hopefully this time it will be a slow snowmelt," Roth said.
Particularly hard hit by the storm were eastern South Dakota and southwestern Minnesota. Winds in excess of 50 mph (80.46 kph) also were expected, creating life-threatening conditions, according to the National Weather Service.
"We're calling it historic because of the widespread heavy snow. We will set some records," said Mike Connelly, a weather service meteorologist in Aberdeen, South Dakota.
Transportation officials closed Interstate 29 from east central South Dakota to the North Dakota border, as well as a 270-mile (434-kilometer) section of Interstate 90 between Rapid City and Mitchell, South Dakota. Numerous traffic crashes were reported in northeastern South Dakota, and the storm knocked out power to thousands of homes and businesses in Sioux Falls.
In Colorado, officials closed a 150-mile (241-kilometer) stretch of Interstate 76 from just northeast of Denver to the Nebraska border, and Gov. Jared Polis activated the National Guard in case troops are needed to rescue stranded motorists. Denver Public Schools announced delayed starts Thursday for some campuses due to weather.
 
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MurphCO

Enough of this palaver
Donator
#3
This one was less powerful than the one a month ago
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
#5
Seriously, turn off the Halliburton Weather Machine and those things won't happen.
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#7
Didn't Cyclogenesis regenerate Spock in Star Trek III?
 
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