Boy genius's book reveals life in college at age 8

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#1
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The one thing 14-year-old Moshe Kai Cavalin dislikes is being called a genius.
All he did, after all, was enroll in college at age 8 and earn his first of two Associate of Arts degrees from East Los Angeles Community College at age 9, graduating with a perfect 4.0 grade point average.
Now, at 14, he's poised to graduate from UCLA this year. He's also just published an English edition of his first book, "We Can Do."
The 100-page guideline explains how other young people can accomplish what Cavalin did through such simple acts as keeping themselves focused and approaching everything with total commitment. He's hoping it will show people there's no genius involved, just hard work.
"That's always the question that bothers me," Cavalin, who turned 14 on Valentine's Day, says when the G-word is raised. "People need to know you don't really need to be a genius. You just have to work hard and you can accomplish anything."
And maybe cut out some of the TV.
Although he's a big fan of Jackie Chan movies, Cavalin says he limits his television time to four hours a week.
Not that he lacks for recreational activities or feels that his parents pressured him into studying constantly. He writes in "We Can Do" of learning to scuba dive, and he loves soccer and martial arts. He used to participate in the latter sport when he was younger, winning trophies for his age group, until his UCLA studies and his writing made things a little too hectic.
Indeed one of the key messages of his book is to stay focused and to not take on any endeavor half-heartedly.
"I was able to reach the stars, but others can reach the 'Milky Way," he tells readers.
It was a professor at his first institution of higher learning, East Los Angeles City College, who inspired him, Cavalin says. He didn't like the subject but managed to get an A in it anyway, by applying himself and seeing how enthusiastic his teacher, Richard Avila, was about the subject.
Avila, he says, inspired him to write a book explaining his methods for success so he could motivate others.
It took four years to finish, in part because Cavalin, whose mother is Chinese, decided to publish it in Chinese, and doing the translation himself was laborious.
Han Shian Culture Publishing of Taiwan put the book in print, and it did well in Taiwan, Singapore and Malaysia, as well in several bookstores in Southern California's Asian communities. He then brought it out in English for the U.S. market.
Because of his heavy study load, Cavalin has had little opportunity to promote the book, other than a signing at UCLA, where he also lives in student housing with his parents and attends the school on a scholarship.
After earning his bachelor's degree, the math major plans to enroll in graduate school with hopes of eventually earning a doctorate.
After that, he's not so sure. He points out that he's still just barely a teenager.
"Who knows?" he says, chuckling at the thought of what lies ahead in adulthood. "That's a very distant future, and I'm pretty much planning for just the next few years. That's too far into the future for me to see."
http://news.yahoo.com/boy-geniuss-b...01N2I0LTExZTEtOWY2YS1mZjE0YjQ5MjUwNjc-;_ylv=3

Them Asians do gud in da schoolin'.
 

Fustercluck

Registered User
Jul 25, 2005
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#6
All he did, after all, was enroll in college at age 8 and earn his first of two Associate of Arts degrees from East Los Angeles Community College at age 9,
not impressed.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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Jan 12, 2010
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#8
My cousin graduated from a community college. I'm still convinced that most community colleges will give low functioning retards an Associate of Arts degree.
I started at a community college, but went simply to save money on my general ed. They're pretty valueless unless you want to go into a specific industry that works with them, or plan to transfer.
 

Motor Head

HIGHWAY TRASH REMOVAL
Jan 23, 2006
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#9
I started at a community college, but went simply to save money on my general ed. They're pretty valueless unless you want to go into a specific industry that works with them, or plan to transfer.
I think they do offer some value if you train for a specific job. There are a ton of local cops that went to CC and got degrees in Criminal Justice, and did security work for awhile. They eventually end up getting a slot in the academy because after they fill the first half of each class at the academy with guys from the military and with 4 year degrees, they will still need more officer candidates. A general arts degree, meh.....puts you ahead of the people that have no degree.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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Jan 12, 2010
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#11
I think they do offer some value if you train for a specific job. There are a ton of local cops that went to CC and got degrees in Criminal Justice, and did security work for awhile. They eventually end up getting a slot in the academy because after they fill the first half of each class at the academy with guys from the military and with 4 year degrees, they will still need more officer candidates. A general arts degree, meh.....puts you ahead of the people that have no degree.
The one I went to was decent size (~15,000 students) and they had special deals with certain car manufacturers for their auto program, a pretty good building inspector program, deals with police and fire agencies for people who took those courses, and so on.

Personally I had no idea where I wanted to go when I got out of high school, so I moved away, went to community college, and worked/partied for a few years. I was able to get my general ed out of the way and take a bunch of courses cheaply to figure out what I wanted to do. I ended up with around 96 credits that probably cost around $1500 (not counting books/living expenses). That would have probably costed over $20,000 at a 4-year school, and most of the classes were transferable.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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#12
He still has tiny genitals and too little time to find a hole to stick them in.