Building a deck

Haeder

South Dakota
#1
Finally going to build a deck on the back of our house. 14 feet wide and 20 feet out from the house. Nothing too complicated or intricate. Rectangular deck, two sets of steps, built in bench and a built in table six feet square with built in coolers.

The dog helped lay out the footprint of the structure.



The dog did not help auger in footing holes. I used this.....



......to dig eight holes that were 42" deep. That's all the deeper the auger would go.



The dog wasn't helpful with the shovel work either. I want a solid surface for the bottom of the stairs to rest on so two 24x48" holes were dug.



Then 10" of crushed rock was packed in to each auger hole and both shovel holes.



Added some concrete to the holes.



And now I'm waiting for the lumber to be delivered so I can get started on the above grade work.
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
#4
I won't have a deck, they are known to attract dangerous wildlife.


 

maz

TRueWDTer
#5
I won't have a deck, they are known to attract dangerous wildlife.



I'm pretty sure you own at least 1 firearm , sir
That goat should be no match for you
 

maz

TRueWDTer
#6
If that is day #1, I really feel like a lazy shit...
You wouldn't have used a hand auger
I've never even seen one before

Work smarter , not harder
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
#7
I'm pretty sure you own at least 1 firearm , sir
That goat should be no match for you
You kid, butt it could

oh never mind.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#8
meh, fuck that noise, i don't like shovels
 

5skin

Somewhere on Molly Ringwald
#9
I'd have stopped at two holes for a deck that size.
 

Haeder

South Dakota
#10
If that is day #1, I really feel like a lazy shit...
Three hours on a Thursday evening and four hours the next day.

Took about 20 minutes to auger each of the first seven holes. Hit some hard clay on hole #8 about a foot down so I filled the hole with water and let it soak in over night. Easy going the next morning. The shovel holes only took an hour to finish. Adding rock and setting forms took an hour and the concrete work took less than two hours.
 
#11
What are you using for the actual deck... PT, Cedar or some engineered product? And fastening method just face nailing or doing some sort of hidden fastener?
 

Haeder

South Dakota
#12
What are you using for the actual deck... PT, Cedar or some engineered product? And fastening method just face nailing or doing some sort of hidden fastener?
Pressure treated lumber. Menards has a product called cedar tone that has a pigment added to the pressure treatment that produces a cedar-like finish on the product. I used it on my front deck and I am happy with the product.

Going to use treated nails, screws or carriage bolts to fasten everything. No hidden fasteners.
 
#13
I've heard of that stuff... and I'd use those porcelain coated screws. Get the square drive aka Robertson head as they don't cam out as much as Phillips screws.
 
#14
If you have any issues at all with your neighbors, make sure you get all the proper permits and inspections.When I bought my house there was a warped half-framed deck off the back door. I asked the neighbors what happened and they said that someone ratted him (the former owner) out, inspector wasn't happy with the footings (even though the guy had the thing framed out already) and ordered him to stop and re-do it. Instead the dude just decided to say fuck it and not finish the deck...meaning we couldn't use the kitchen door. I had to rip it all down and start from scratch.
 

5skin

Somewhere on Molly Ringwald
#15
If you have any issues at all with your neighbors, make sure you get all the proper permits and inspections.When I bought my house there was a warped half-framed deck off the back door. I asked the neighbors what happened and they said that someone ratted him (the former owner) out, inspector wasn't happy with the footings (even though the guy had the thing framed out already) and ordered him to stop and re-do it. Instead the dude just decided to say fuck it and not finish the deck...meaning we couldn't use the kitchen door. I had to rip it all down and start from scratch.
Did he put gravel under 6" footings because that's a no no. Footings must be at least 12" and on solid tamped soil.
 
#16
Did he put gravel under 6" footings because that's a no no. Footings must be at least 12" and on solid tamped soil.
According to the inspector his issue wasn't with the depth he just didn't pour enough footings to support the size deck he was building, but since he had it framed he didn't want to tear it down. I was allowed to use the footings that were already there and just added the necessary additional footings to bring it to code.
 

mikeybot

SPANAKOPITA!!!
#17
Use screws and make pilot holes for them. Fuck using nails.
When I was 13, my dad and I built and obnoxiously above code 20x30 deck curved around 1/3 of our above ground pool(very high water table, in ground was out of the question). Decking was 2x6 pressure treated, joists were 2x8, posts were mostly 4x4 with some 4x6, ledger board was 2x12. Outside framing was attached to the posts by 1/2 inch carriage bolts. Post holes were 36x12 with sonic tubes put inside of them.
The deck might be more structurally sound than the house (mid 50s split level)
 

Haeder

South Dakota
#18
I've heard of that stuff... and I'd use those porcelain coated screws. Get the square drive aka Robertson head as they don't cam out as much as Phillips screws.
I prefer torx myself.



If you have any issues at all with your neighbors, make sure you get all the proper permits and inspections.When I bought my house there was a warped half-framed deck off the back door. I asked the neighbors what happened and they said that someone ratted him (the former owner) out, inspector wasn't happy with the footings (even though the guy had the thing framed out already) and ordered him to stop and re-do it. Instead the dude just decided to say fuck it and not finish the deck...meaning we couldn't use the kitchen door. I had to rip it all down and start from scratch.
$20.00 building permit from the municipal government. No building inspector to worry about. According to building codes I probably should have augered in 12" diameter holes instead of 9" diameter holes.

Use screws and make pilot holes for them. Fuck using nails.
Nail gun. If one of the nails is protruding above the surface of the wood I have a handy little palm nailer to remedy the problem.
 
#19
I prefer torx myself.





$20.00 building permit from the municipal government. No building inspector to worry about. According to building codes I probably should have augered in 12" diameter holes instead of 9" diameter holes.



Nail gun. If one of the nails is protruding above the surface of the wood I have a handy little palm nailer to remedy the problem.

When I used to do decks in Canada the square drive were less money then the torx... but anything is better then phillips...
 

Haeder

South Dakota
#20
When I used to do decks in Canada the square drive were less money then the torx... but anything is better then phillips...
Except a fucking flat head. Fuck flat heads.

Torx and square drive screws are the same price.
 

NotSoFast

Registered User
#21
And get the screws with the drill bit-like tips. No need for pilot holes. Similar to:

 
#22


I wonder if these trim head screws have the same holding power as the bugle headed ones.
 
#23
$20.00 building permit from the municipal government. No building inspector to worry about. According to building codes I probably should have augered in 12" diameter holes instead of 9" diameter holes.
That's the way it should be. NJ is a pain in the ass. I assume it varies by municipality, but i have built decks in 2 different towns. both times the inspector had to come out and sign off on the footings, then the framing, then the final product after the railings were up. The first one was a real ball buster every step. the second one was a lot more lenient but still had to have the inspections done.
 
#24
That's the way it should be. NJ is a pain in the ass. I assume it varies by municipality, but i have built decks in 2 different towns. both times the inspector had to come out and sign off on the footings, then the framing, then the final product after the railings were up. The first one was a real ball buster every step. the second one was a lot more lenient but still had to have the inspections done.
Here isn't too bad... like I can't change the foot print of my building as it is within 75' of the high water mark. I know when the neighbor replaced their old dock they had to involve the down, DEP and the state historic board...
 
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