Canadian Election Marred by Rare Violence: English vs French

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Wackbag Staff
Aug 14, 2000
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VOA

Canadian Election Marred by Rare Violence


Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois stands with her family after winning a minority government in the Quebec provincial election in Montreal, Quebec, September 4, 2012.

VOA News

September 05, 2012
A deadly shooting has marred an election night victory party in Quebec, Canada, a country where political violence is rare.

Police say one person was killed and another badly wounded after a gunman opened fire, Tuesday, during Pauline Marois' victory speech. The leader of the separatist Parti Quebecois is set to become Quebec's first female premier.

Authorities have arrested the alleged gunman.

The motive for the shooting is unclear, but police say the man shouted "The English are waking up!" as he was captured. Investigators also say the alleged gunman set fire to the back of the building before he was arrested.

Marois was rushed off the stage by her bodyguards, but returned later to finish her speech.

The Parti Quebecois defeated the Liberals, who governed French-speaking Quebec province for nine years. The separatists campaigned on what they called the Liberal's mishandling of the economy, alleged corruption, and a hike in college tuition that led to sometimes violent student protests earlier this year.

Many French-speaking Canadians in Quebec want to secede from Canada, where the majority of citizens speak English.

In 1970, political violence rocked Quebec. A separatist militant group kidnapped and killed a labor minister during a period that became known as the "October Crisis."
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#3
Parti Quebecois basically wants to separate Quebec from Canada... that and they pushed through all the wacky language laws like the French always has to be on top and in bigger type on sinage...
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#5
Enough to have French as an official language...
 

Yesterdays Hero

She's better than you, Smirkalicious.
Jan 25, 2007
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Canada. Land of the Fat.
#6
No surprise. Quebec has always wanted out. They're incredibly anal over there especially if you speak English.
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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#8
Parti Quebecois basically wants to separate Quebec from Canada... that and they pushed through all the wacky language laws like the French always has to be on top and in bigger type on sinage...
I think if the Quebecois were willing to give up their federal gov't subsidies, a lot of Canada would be happy to let them secede.

Quebec is one giant, French-speaking, economic backwater. Outside of Montreal which has tourism money in large part because they whore out their young women (and some young men), Quebec is basically a giant mostly inland fishing village and a giant farm with mostly bad weather. And so many don't learn to speak English so they're in an economic ghetto, stuck in Quebec.

All French nationalism has done for Quebec is to keep their young people from being able to more easily move away from Quebec and earn better livings elsewhere. As is, the migration from Quebec is pretty obvious when you pay attention to how many people of French-Canadian heritage live throughout New England.

Not to over-broaden the scope of the discussion, but this is also why I'm not bothered by "pressing 2 to speak Spanish" on a phone menu and the like. The economic incentives of learning English will get the second and third generation of any immigrant wave to this country.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#10
I think if the Quebecois were willing to give up their federal gov't subsidies, a lot of Canada would be happy to let them secede.

Quebec is one giant, French-speaking, economic backwater. Outside of Montreal which has tourism money in large part because they whore out their young women (and some young men), Quebec is basically a giant mostly inland fishing village and a giant farm with mostly bad weather. And so many don't learn to speak English so they're in an economic ghetto, stuck in Quebec.

All French nationalism has done for Quebec is to keep their young people from being able to more easily move away from Quebec and earn better livings elsewhere. As is, the migration from Quebec is pretty obvious when you pay attention to how many people of French-Canadian heritage live throughout New England.

Not to over-broaden the scope of the discussion, but this is also why I'm not bothered by "pressing 2 to speak Spanish" on a phone menu and the like. The economic incentives of learning English will get the second and third generation of any immigrant wave to this country.
I would have expanded like you did but figured no one would be interested. I can tell you back in the day when I was in the reserves Quebec regiments always got new equipment before us... Shocking... Feh

Shocking thing is they don't realize how much federal investment has been made in that province... Everything from roads to the hydroelectric damns up north...
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VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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#11
I would have expanded like you did but figured no one would be interested. I can tell you back in the day when I was in the reserves Quebec regiments always got new equipment before us... Shocking... Feh

Shocking thing is they don't realize how much federal investment has been made in that province... Everything from roads to the hydroelectric damns up north...
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Wasn't there a Quebecois political party that was blatantly gimmedat? That their only goal was to bring more Canadian federal dollars into Quebec by selling their party's votes as a block to whichever national party would give Quebec more pork?

These fucking idiots are clinging to a French national identity that is on the decline internationally, pointless in North America, and does nothing for them. It's just stupidity at its worst.

For fuck's sake, they're French people without the scenery or the wine! What's the fucking point, other than going to Montreal to fuck their daughters?
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#12
Pretty much... Basically "we want to be are own country"... But psssst we still want money from where the money is made. Ergo Ontario (financial center) or Alberta (oil sands)... So when I say I am from Canada here... They go are you from Quebec... I go fuck no. I actually have a work ethic.



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Norm Stansfield

私は亀が好きだ。
Mar 17, 2009
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#13
So just to sum it up, Quebec should be nuked from orbit.
 

lajikal

Registered User
Aug 6, 2009
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#14
... Queerbec... High-five!
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#15
And they are starting the whole sovereignty thing again... they will spend a shit ton of money on it and as always it ends up at basically a 50/50 split...

Citizen-initiated referendum possible with PQ minority

At her press conference the day after leading her Parti Québécois to victory, no reporter asked Pauline Marois about a referendum on sovereignty, according to several news reports.

That's not surprising, both because she will head a minority government and because during the campaign, and before, she left the impression she did not believe this was the time for a referendum.

"I will adopt what it is possible for me to adopt," she told the media on Wednesday.

However, the PQ could still try to bring in legislation on citizen initiatives — as they promised during the campaign — a process that could eventually lead to Quebec's third sovereignty referendum.

But before such a vote could take place, many things would need to happen. It's also possible for another election to remake the Quebec political scene given a PQ minority government.

The PQ election platform simply states the party's support for a referendum when it gets the support of 15 per cent of the electorate through a citizen initiative.

First, legislation around citizen initiatives needs to be drafted, introduced, studied, debated, passed and become law.

That plank became a part of the PQ election platform after a debate in January at the party's national council. At the time there was something of a crisis around Marois's leadership, initiated after some caucus members left the party because they perceived Marois as unwilling to promise to hold a referendum if elected.

At the council meeting, MNA Bernard Drainville made the argument that the sovereignty issue did not belong solely to the PQ, that other parties and movements that support a sovereignty option should be given the right to initiate a referendum, even if the government was not in favour.

In the end, the PQ did support citizen initiatives, which some observers felt was done to stifle dissent within the party.

Citizen initiative law required


The first step on this road would be to draft legislation to amend the Referendum Act, according to Daniel Turp, who teaches constitutional law at the Université de Montreal. Turp is also a former PQ MNA and a former Bloc Québécois MP.

Marois did not make a big deal about citizen initiatives during the election campaign, and did make clear that other issues are priorities.

Turp does not expect citizen initiatives will be something the Marois government makes part of its first hundred days of governing.

Historian David Mitchell agrees. The native Montrealer is now the president and CEO of the Public Policy Forum in Ottawa. Mitchell argues that with its citizen initiative policy, the PQ has, "very adroitly deferred the actual, practical matter of a referendum, perhaps until the next election or certainly for the next several years."

By providing a means for citizens to make this happen on their own, the PQ takes the political pressure off itself, Mitchell told CBC News.

Turp says a PQ government could table the legislation as early as 2013. Indeed, Marois, perhaps anticipating a majority, told the La Presse editors that the referendum in Scotland on independence that's set for 2014 could provide an opportunity for Quebec to also hold a referendum, although she did acknowledge, even then, that the PQ may have to be more patient.

"We will be watching very closely what happens in Scotland," she said.

The B.C. experience


Of course, citizen-initiated referendums are already on the books outside Quebec, notably in some U.S. states, Switzerland and elsewhere.

In Canada, B.C.'s experience stands out.

David Mitchell was a Liberal MLA in B.C. when the NDP government introduced and eventually passed the Recall and Initiative Act in 1995.

At the time, he told CBC News, he wasn't sure it was a good idea but "if you are going to have this kind of so-called direct democracy, it should at least have the possibility of working."

And he thought by requiring the signatures of 10 per cent of the constituents in every riding, it was inconceivable a citizen-initiated referendum could happen.
As Mitchell recognizes, he was proved wrong. In 2011, a citizen initiative for a referendum on the harmonized sales tax (HST) succeeded.

That effort was led by Bill Vander Zalm, B.C. premier from 1986 to 1991.
In 2009, the Liberals had been returned to office in a provincial election. A few months later, the government surprised and angered B.C. voters by announcing it would bring in the HST.

B.C.'s chief electoral officer approved Vander Zalm's petition proposal in February 2010 and the signature drive began that April. Vander Zalm delivered the petition two months later and in August the petition was approved. The mail-in referendum would not be completed until a year later, with the anti-HST forces prevailing.

The whole process took 16 months. On April 1, 2013, B.C. will drop the HST and bring back the PST and GST.

Setting a workable but not easy threshold


Vander Zalm told CBC News that the ten per cent in every constituency threshold made it very difficult but the PQ proposal of 15 per cent "may be too easy, if it's just 15 per cent of the electorate."

That is what the PQ platform says but Turp and others expect there will be some sort of regional threshold to meet, if and when a bill is introduced.

During the PQ debate, Turp says the references were to regional thresholds, not constituency thresholds.

While Vander Zalm strongly supports citizen initiatives, he argues, "the rules need to be such that it's workable but not so easy as to make it, perhaps, so it can be abused."

Assuming citizen initiative legislation does become law in Quebec, before there can be a referendum, the next step is a petition campaign.

As the B.C. experience shows, that can be a tall order, since the anti-HST campaign is the only one to succeed. In Quebec, 15 per cent means gathering 850,000 signatures, although the exercise could be made easier if people can sign online.

Of course if the PQ government wants a referendum, there is no need for new legislation and no need for an onerous petition campaign. "The Referendum Act as it stands allows the government to initiate a referendum on its own," following 35 hours of debate in the National Assembly, Turp explained.
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Dec 8, 2004
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#16
Oh and:

[h=1]Montreal shooter's gun appeared to jam: witnesses


Richard Henry Bain[/h]



Shooting suspect Richard Henry Bain poses with Celine Dion after winning an auction bid to meet the singer in Las Vegas on Jan. 15, 2012

On the day that the suspect in a deadly Montreal election night shooting is set to appear in court, reports have begun to emerge that the shooter’s gun jammed, possibly preventing more fatalities.

A gunman opened fire on Tuesday night as premier-elect Pauline Marois was giving her victory speech in a club in Montreal. One man was killed and another person was injured in the violence which occurred just outside the club.

However, CTV News Channel's Todd van der Heyden said eyewitness accounts are now suggesting the suspect's gun failed.

"In fact there could have been many more injuries and possibly more fatalities -- the reason for that is that the man had an assault rifle...and we're hearing from witnesses the gun appeared to have jammed after only a few rounds were fired," van der Heyden told CTV’s Canada AM on Thursday.

Richard Henry Bain will appear in a Montreal court later Thursday where he is expected to be formally charged.

Investigators and observers are trying to determine how the suspect managed to get to the door of the club where Marois was speaking, while apparently wearing a bathrobe, balaclava and carrying an assault rifle.

"There are a lot of questions about how he was able to get so close," said van der Heyden, reporting from Montreal.

Details have begun to emerge about the 62-year-old Bain, who was arrested just moments after the shooting at the door to the Metropolis club, which the Parti Quebecois had rented for its victory celebration.

One man was killed in the shooting, while another person was injured. Security personnel rushed Marois off the stage when the violence broke out.

Van der Heyden said Bain is the owner of a hunting and fishing camp in the Laurentians, and had recently attempted to expand his business but had run into bureaucratic roadblocks which friends said left him "disgruntled."

"We also know he had mental illness issues and he was apparently seeing a doctor here in Montreal for that," van der Heyden told Canada AM.

Bain moved to the predominantly francophone village of La Conception and registered his business in 2009, although records show it was never properly licensed.

“He was frustrated that his business wasn't taking off,” Nicolas Picq told CTV News.

Officials at La Conception's City Hall said Bain had recently asked the province for permission to take adventurers on hunting expeditions in the area, but the Ministry of Natural Resources said the proposal needed further consideration.

A letter from the ministry requiring Bain to complete an environmental study before his proposal could go any further arrived on Tuesday, the day of the shooting, officials said.

La Conception Mayor Maurice Plouffe said he was surprised by the allegations involving Bain. He described him as a tenacious businessman and a tough guy.

Neighbours said Bain was also kind and generous.

Police said one man was killed and another was injured when gunfire erupted at the Metropolis concert hall on St. Catherine Street in downtown Montreal, where Marois was celebrating her party's victory late Tuesday night.

CTV Montreal reports that Denis Blanchette, believed to be a freelance technician hired to work at the election-night event, died of his injuries.

The second victim, a 27-year-old man, remains in hospital in stable condition.

In the aftermath of the shooting, a man was arrested wearing a blue housecoat and a balaclava, and shouting "The English are waking up" in French, while police led him away.

The suspect has been under evaluation in a Montreal hospital since his arrest.

Police said an assault rifle and a handgun were seized at the scene, and they said Wednesday that Marois was the intended target.

A small fire, believed to be the result of a Molotov cocktail thrown by the suspect, was also quickly extinguished.
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