Carbon Monoxide Detectors Question- Slight Chance of Urgency

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,067
49,625
644
#1
Earlier this evening I was using my oven for about 3, 4 hours. I've never had trouble using it that long before. Anyway, my carbon monoxide detector starts to go off. So I turn off my oven open all my windows, all my doors and it keeps going off.

What I'm asking is, can ovens cause the CO detector to go off? If not the oven, then what? How long should the alarm continuously go off? Was opening the doors and windows a good idea or useless? And what are signs of CO poisoning?
 

NikkorTheMonk

Registered User
Apr 26, 2005
1,524
54
473
#2
Have you recently started up your furnace for the season? Don't think a stove should cause your you carbon detector to go off. Smoke detector yes.

Sleepiness, pounding headache, neasea, death, but you wont notice the last symptom. Open all the windows and doors, get fresh ventilation throughout the house and exit the premesis for an hour or so. Change the battery too for extra precaution.
 
Nov 29, 2006
3,452
374
523
FL
#3
Earlier this evening I was using my oven for about 3, 4 hours. I've never had trouble using it that long before. Anyway, my carbon monoxide detector starts to go off. So I turn off my oven open all my windows, all my doors and it keeps going off.

What I'm asking is, can ovens cause the CO detector to go off? If not the oven, then what? How long should the alarm continuously go off? Was opening the doors and windows a good idea or useless? And what are signs of CO poisoning?
CO is a byproduct of combustion. Is it a gas oven? Do you have a furnace?

Ventilating the house was the right thing to do. And I believe the first signs of CO poisoning are fatigue, confusion, and headache.

Also, the detector might just need a new battery.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,067
49,625
644
#4
I called the fire department (after easily over 45 minutes, I don't call the fire department if it was a little thing), they came, did readings, said they couldn't find anything on their meter and that sometimes letting the (gas) oven run for awhile can lead to the alarm going off but they ran their tests and said not to worry.
 

Mommadeez4u

Bastard coated bastard w/ bastard filling
Mar 26, 2005
4,024
902
608
Washington, DC
#6
Trivia...anyone know where this pictures from?

You mean, what movie featured it? Good Will Hunting, fellah
 

pike

You will be molested
Aug 8, 2004
639
0
0
Cleveland, OH
#7
I called the fire department
That's what I was going to tell you to do.. they don't mind coming out for a call like this and like you said, they'll check around with their (very accurate) equipment.

Check your CO detector for a sticker on the back. Mine have a "REPLACE BY:" date stamped on them. Apparently something inside stops working properly after a couple years. If it doesn't have a sticker it's probably old enough to where it needs to be replaced..
 
Apr 22, 2005
3,988
0
261
Bucks Co., PA
#8
Sounds to be a faulty detector or bad battery.

Everything posted here is good advise. Just curious, did the CO detector have a read out on the PPM of CO?
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,067
49,625
644
#9
Sounds to be a faulty detector or bad battery.

Everything posted here is good advise. Just curious, did the CO detector have a read out on the PPM of CO?
No, just a red light that said "get to fresh air."
 
Apr 22, 2005
3,988
0
261
Bucks Co., PA
#10
No, just a red light that said "get to fresh air."
I like the detectors with the read out.

Here's a good breakdown of the symptoms:

35 ppm (0.0035%) Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure
100 ppm (0.01%) Slight headache in two to three hours
200 ppm (0.02%) Slight headache within two to three hours
400 ppm (0.04%) Frontal headache within one to two hours
800 ppm (0.08%) Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 minutes. Insensible within two hours.
1,600 ppm (0.16%) Headache, dizziness, and nausea within 20 minutes. Death in less than two hours.
3,200 ppm (0.32%) Headache, dizziness and nausea in five to ten minutes. Death within 30 minutes.
6,400 ppm (0.64%) Headache and dizziness in one to two minutes. Death in less than 20 minutes.
12,800 ppm (1.28%)Unconsciousness after 2-3 breaths. Death in less than three minutes.


Calling the fire department and either getting out of the home or opening windows is the best thing to do. In this area of PA the home owner is usually just told to open the windows and turn off appliances is an alarm is sounding with no symptoms of CO poisoning. If any symptoms are present, then they are told to evacuate and wait to the FD.

I was in an environment of 600 ppm for an hour and I can say it's a nauseating migraine with the feeling of wanting to pass out.