Catcher in the Rye dropped from US school curriculum

BIV

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Catcher in the Rye dropped from US school curriculum

Schools in America are to drop classic books such as Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird and JD Salinger's Catcher in the Rye from their curriculum in favour of 'informational texts'.

11:51AM GMT 07 Dec 2012

American literature classics are to be replaced by insulation manuals and plant inventories in US classrooms by 2014.

A new school curriculum which will affect 46 out of 50 states will make it compulsory for at least 70 per cent of books studied to be non-fiction, in an effort to ready pupils for the workplace.

Books such as JD Salinger's Catcher in the Rye and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird will be replaced by "informational texts" approved by the Common Core State Standards.

Suggested non-fiction texts include Recommended Levels of Insulation by the the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Invasive Plant Inventory, by California's Invasive Plant Council.

The new educational standards have the backing of the influential National Governors' Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, and are being part-funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
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Jamie Highfill, a teacher at Woodland Junior High School in Arkansas, told the Times that the directive was bad for a well-rounded education.

"I'm afraid we are taking out all imaginative reading and creativity in our English classes.

"In the end, education has to be about more than simply ensuring that kids can get a job. Isn't it supposed to be about making well-rounded citizens?"

Supporters of the directive argue that it will help pupils to develop the ability to write concisely and factually, which will be more useful in the workplace than a knowledge of Shakespeare.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/...he-Rye-dropped-from-US-school-curriculum.html
 
Dec 12, 2007
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#2
Supporters of the directive argue that it will help pupils to develop the ability to write concisely and factually, which will be more useful in the workplace than a knowledge of Shakespeare.
Have to agree.
 

Psychopath

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So let me get this straight. They are trying to turn more kids off to reading? Because that's exactly what they are fucking doing. Good job assholes.
 

Discoman

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#4
Part of the school curriculum is making model citizens. I know we ultimately failed with that, but its better than churning out worker drones.
 

Gorilla Pimp

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#5
having original ideas and opinions is for faggots.
 

BIV

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#6
How about you go the other way. Give the kids some actually entertaining books and they may start to read.

Why are we still force feeding kids "classics." Most of them are shit.

Part of what they are trying to do I like. How about you get rid of that third or fourth year math that no one ever uses and add a mandatory class called "Practical Knowledge." There you can teach them things like balancing accounts, basic cooking concepts, basic carpentry, how to sew on buttons and quick and dirty stitches, basic first aid...you know, shit the kids will actually need.
 

gleet

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#7
I see this as a positive move. I was a bit of a trend-setter. My 3rd grade book report on,
Environmental Factors in the Design of Building Fenestration (Architectural science series)

is still talked about to this day.
 

Neckbeard

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The indoctrinated little mongoloids are functional or pure illiterates anyhow so who cares about what they "read?"

Over half a trillion dollars a year is spent just on public education in America and 20 percent of the adults in this country can't even hack the game on the back of their cereal box.

I think the magazines and newspapers have dropped down in quality and difficulty, too. Reading comprehension is for faggots, yo. Most of the people who aren't pure or functional illiterates cannot read or understand for shit. I'd have to say it is all written at a middle school level, probably 7th grade.

Edit: Mass, compulsory, half a trillion dollars of public schools churn out retards. Every year there is a new theory put out and a new dogma insisted upon and this year's dogma is the practical reading stuff.
It won't work because the last 100 (time to get all Kirk truth-bombing in this motherfucker) TRENDY theories fucking failed.
 

Neckbeard

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Is the Department of Education even constitutional? Oh silly me. There I go caring about that goddamned piece of paper and leaving children behind.
 

fletcher

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#11
Catcher in the Rye has sucked and will always suck. Its not a terrible book but the fact is that it is famous because of Lennon's murder. Give the kids a copy of Last Exit to Brooklyn for all I care, they would be better off.
 

weeniewawa

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#12
the DOE isn't constitutional

and I bet they are getting rid of it because of all those hard to say multi syllable words.

you know, the ones you can't use in rap music
 
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#13
All I remember about english class in school was hating it and wishing I was in science class or at home. I really don't see the problem of teaching kids more technical stuff over that book about some bum who wanders around at night.

Teaching the kids to apply logic and reason toward life would be helpful I think. "I shouldn't hit Billy with a rock to the head because based on the squirrel testing things die when hit with rocks".
 

LiddyRules

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I wish I got to read the the Invasive Plant Inventory when I was in school.

Something about this seems odd to me. Would an English lit class, which is where I assume Catcher and Mockingbird would be read, be the right place for Botany 101?
 

whiskeyguy

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I don't agree with the constitutionality of this... curriculum should be developed by states and districts.

That said, fucking try something new. I love reading fiction but sadly many high school kids don't. Think back to English class... how much did you actually get out of sitting around staring out the window as one student at a time read out loud (badly) for 5 minutes? Studying these novels can be a great experience if your teacher is passionate and motivated, but these days they're more worried about their pensions.

When I took a technical writing class in college I was surprised it wasn't a high school requirement. Being able to communicate effectively, especially through text, is massively important in the business world. Biv mentioned teaching math we don't use (which is a good point), but I've also never (unfortunately) heard someone on the sidewalk yell out "Stars, hide your fires! Let not light see my black and deep desires". While it may benefit kids to read Macbeth, I think being able to communicate clearly and effectively is more important.

The job of public education is first to create a solid base that allows someone to be a productive member of society. If more potential is shown, by all means have avenues for that to play out (English AP classes, for example).
 
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#17
The Hatchet was the shit.
I correct myself , I did enjoy two books from english.

Island of the Blue Dolphins and the Hatchet, figures I would like the two books that take place with a person living out in nature.
 

whiskeyguy

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The Hatchet was the shit.
I correct myself , I did enjoy two books from english.

Island of the Blue Dolphins and the Hatchet, figures I would like the two books that take place with a person living out in nature.
A lot of the HS English books I didn't enjoy until I read them again later in life, but there were a few books I really did enjoy (most were probably middle school books). The Hatchet definitely (even read the squeal), Banner in the Sky, and Z for Zachariah were some good ones.
 

Ego

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#19
I got to read a bunch of Stephen King books as an optional extracirricular assignment to offset my bad grades from my shitty attendance. High school was a bad time for me, but It, Needful Things, The Stand, The Green Mile, The Shining...hell, the book reports just flew out of me. Awesome.
 

Mikefrombx

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As someone being trained by multiple agencies with the ccss (common core state standards) let me calm you dummies down. The idea is to get students to read and write in everything. Now the focus is on cross curricular units.
You are still allowed and encouraged to pick the text your students will read but now you have to tie other subjects to it. So you read catcher I the rye and have the students learn and research mental disorders, depression, drug usage, etc. Students can read shawshank redemption and then read other text about prisons. From this the students will create research projects on prison populations during the time frame compared to now, etc.
Just having students read a text and then spit back a book report from spark notes doesn't work. The things getting focused on with common core are what great teaches have done for years. A focus on student task and engaged through task development, learning progressions, a d questioning technique is how you make students succeed and now it is being applied nationally.
 

Party Rooster

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#21
Is the Department of Education even constitutional? Oh silly me. There I go caring about that goddamned piece of paper and leaving children behind.
the DOE isn't constitutional
I don't agree with the constitutionality of this... curriculum should be developed by states and districts.
You guys suck at reading comprehension. The curriculum is decided by the states and partly funded by Bill Gates. Product of the public school system? :action-sm

...Books such as JD Salinger's Catcher in the Rye and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird will be replaced by "informational texts" approved by the Common Core State Standards...


...The new educational standards have the backing of the influential National Governors' Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, and are being part-funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Q. Is having common standards the first step toward nationalizing education?

A. No. The Common Core State Standards are part of a state-led effort to give all students the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. The federal government was not involved in the development of the standards. Individual states choose whether or not to adopt these standards.

Q. What is the Common Core State Standards Initiative?

A. The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort to establish a shared set of clear educational standards for English language arts and mathematics that states can voluntarily adopt. The standards have been informed by the best available evidence and the highest state standards across the country and globe and designed by a diverse group of teachers, experts, parents, and school administrators, so they reflect both our aspirations for our children and the realities of the classroom. These standards are designed to ensure that students graduating from high school are prepared to go to college or enter the workforce and that parents, teachers, and students have a clear understanding of what is expected of them. The standards are benchmarked to international standards to guarantee that our students are competitive in the emerging global marketplace.

Q. Are these national standards?

A. The federal government was NOT involved in the development of the standards. This has been a state-led and driven initiative from the beginning. States have voluntarily adopted the standards based on the timelines and context in their state.

http://www.corestandards.org/frequently-asked-questions
 

jimmyslostchin

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#22
We never read Catcher In The Rye, and if we had I would have skimmed it enough to complete my homework and hated it. I guess I'm one of the few who enjoyed the classics. The Iliad and the Odyssey, Chaucer, Shakespeare. I dug that shit. Wasn't a fan of The Great Gatsby and that shit.
 

Hudson

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#23
I had a roommate in college who was a science and math major. He couldn't write a paper to save his life. He could do math and science problems out the ass. Could not pass 1st year writing.
 

Mikefrombx

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#24
Everyone talking about constitutionality needs to calm the fuck down.
Race to the top and common core state standards is about identifying and applying best practices.

Here is something else, just because you learned that way does not mean it is the way that things should be done now. In the past you had to send out mail through the post office, the world has changed.

This is the problem with the constant education bashing, the world has moved on from when you went through the school system and there are no, I repeat no, no kids learning the same way as they did thirty years ago.

This is trying to address a problem by applying best practices, something done in business all the time, and you guys are upset. Furthermore, race to the top and ccss create accountability which you idiots are always screaming for. It also sets realistic learning objectives for grades nationally. Stupid Tennessee did not think it was appropriate to teach multiplication until fourth and fifth grade, how can they be held to the rest of the country who teaches multiplication in the third grade?

You can't apply other business models to education because they don't work. And you should not assume that education is broken because it is different from when you went through. It isn't about you shit head it is about what do we have to do so that the students can be successful in the future.
 

whiskeyguy

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#25
We never read Catcher In The Rye, and if we had I would have skimmed it enough to complete my homework and hated it. I guess I'm one of the few who enjoyed the classics. The Iliad and the Odyssey, Chaucer, Shakespeare. I dug that shit. Wasn't a fan of The Great Gatsby and that shit.
I loved Catcher, Gatsby, Lord of the Flies, Of Mice and Men, and so on, but not until I read them on my own.