Cd Ripping

Jan 25, 2006
33,621
4,413
578
Saint Louis
#1
I bought a 500 Gigabyte External Hard Drive the other day with the plan of ripping all my Cds to my computer.
I've got like 4,000 Cds of live shows.

Should it be taking like 45 minutes to rip an 80 minute disc?
I use Dbpoweramp, and am ripping them to like 252 Constant Bit Rate MP3s.

And if I'm doing anything else on my computer it takes like 2 hours to rip completely, it's fucking ridiculous.

My pc is like 5 years old, but everything else works exactly perfectly.
Is my D and E drive just really slow and old?
Can you upgrade these drives, or is that not the problem?

It taka forever to rip a Cd, and I wanted to do about 4,000.
Stupid Computer.
 

Picklestyle

Registered User
Jun 21, 2007
86
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Alabama....ick
#2
are you ripping directly to the external?

if so that would cause it. You may want to try using a better encoder/ripper.

personally I used LAME to encode. Search it on google. There are a ton of programs that will let you rip cd's and use the LAME plug in.
 
Jan 25, 2006
33,621
4,413
578
Saint Louis
#5
Exact Audio Copy rocks the grilled cheese baby

Right, that's another question.
I use EAC all the time, but I can't figure out how to rip directly to MP3.
Mine goes to WAV, then it converts to MP3 which adds longer time.
Is there a way to not go to Wav first? I can't find the right option.

Also, yeah I'm ripping it directly to the External but it makes no difference time ways. I guess it has to do with the Cd drive speed.
And I use the Lame codec in both Dbpoweramp and EAC.
 

JoeyDVDZ

That's MR. MOJO, Motherfucker!
Aug 20, 2004
29,672
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763
#7
If your cd's are bootlegs of live shows, chances are they're analog source copied to CD. If I understand it correctly, analog recordings, even to cd, can't be ripped using digital extraction. Therefore there's a 1 to 1 ratio of file (or track) to rip. In other words, a 4 minute track would take 4 minutes to rip.
 

jackjack

Registered User
May 12, 2007
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Daytona Beach
#8
If your cd's are bootlegs of live shows, chances are they're analog source copied to CD. If I understand it correctly, analog recordings, even to cd, can't be ripped using digital extraction. Therefore there's a 1 to 1 ratio of file (or track) to rip. In other words, a 4 minute track would take 4 minutes to rip.
Makes no sense.. Everything used to be an analog source copied to CD.
Once it is converted to the 'cd audio' protocol and written to the disk, any ripper should treat it as any other cd in cd audio format.

Am I missing something? It wouldn't be the first time..
 

thelord68

There's always time for lubricant
Feb 24, 2003
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Palm Beach Gardens, FL
#9
Try CDex, also the bitrate will affect ripping speed.

Ripping is processor intensive, so depending on what your machine has, it can affect speed. My main machine is nearly 4 years old, but I can usually rip to 160 or 192 kbps in less than a quarter of the running time.

If the bootlegs are one long track, then that would have an effect as well.

The other factor is the external drive. If it is connected via USB 1.1, then you are better off ripping to the hard drive and then copying the mp3 to the drive. If it is USB 2.0, then you should be OK.
 

sniper

Front, and to the right...
Wackbag Staff
It's My Birthday!
Oct 13, 2004
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Masshole
#10
Try CDex, also the bitrate will affect ripping speed.

Ripping is processor intensive, so depending on what your machine has, it can affect speed. My main machine is nearly 4 years old, but I can usually rip to 160 or 192 kbps in less than a quarter of the running time.

If the bootlegs are one long track, then that would have an effect as well.

The other factor is the external drive. If it is connected via USB 1.1, then you are better off ripping to the hard drive and then copying the mp3 to the drive. If it is USB 2.0, then you should be OK.
x2, I use CDex rip to 192, have an older computer and it usually takes 5 minutes/cd (for reference my ripping PC is a 1.4 Ghz/512 MB ram)
But if that external is using the usb 1.1 then rip them in clusters on your hard drive, then move them to the external later when you leave the house or something.
 

JoeyDVDZ

That's MR. MOJO, Motherfucker!
Aug 20, 2004
29,672
5,909
763
#13
Makes no sense.. Everything used to be an analog source copied to CD.
Once it is converted to the 'cd audio' protocol and written to the disk, any ripper should treat it as any other cd in cd audio format.

Am I missing something? It wouldn't be the first time..
I just recall that in the old days of audiograbber, it used to denote discs capable of being ripped using digital extraction vs. discs that couldn't. I could also be wrong, it would definitely not be the first time for me. I'm a huge douche. :)
 

jackjack

Registered User
May 12, 2007
4,994
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Daytona Beach
#14
That does bring back a long-dormant memory. From back in the days when a CD drive came with its own hardware interface board that went in a motherboard slot. I can't remember what the limitation was, but some would rip and others wouldn't.
Anybody remember actual fact? Instead of mostly fog?