Cool shortwave radio tuner

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#2
i have two short wave radios, the only thing worth listening to is BBC world report from london and jebuz apparently jebuz radio is quite popular on the short wave bands. from time to time if the weather is right i can hear radio free america from miami and an english speaking station from hong kong
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
#3
i have two short wave radios, the only thing worth listening to is BBC world report from london and jebuz apparently jebuz radio is quite popular on the short wave bands. from time to time if the weather is right i can hear radio free america from miami and an english speaking station from hong kong
I like listening to number stations.
 

JoeyDVDZ

Well-Known Member
Donator
#4
Do you need an operators license to use this site? I loaded it, and it asked for my ID.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
#8
If you want to listen to some weird spy messages over this go to http://priyom.org/ they have schedules of when the number stations broadcast, they also have the frequencies and they are pretty damn accurate.
 

CougarHunter

Lying causes cat piss smell.
#9
HF amateur radio operates on nearby frequencies. I used to slide over and listen to some of the broadcast stations on occasion. When you have big amateur antennas that are tuned down that low, you get a lot better reception than you would with set top shortwave units. If you have old pre-digital gear, and don't have digital tuning equipment, you could check your tuning by finding known shortwave stations and beacons.
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#10
A friend that was in TV repair showed me how to Tune in FM radio stations on the older analog TV's. There is a tiny sliver of frequency on the TV band that represents the entire FM dial. If the TV channel was on 2, you could sometimes pick up it's audio on the low end of the FM dial.
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
#11
A friend that was in TV repair showed me how to Tune in FM radio stations on the older analog TV's. There is a tiny sliver of frequency on the TV band that represents the entire FM dial. If the TV channel was on 2, you could sometimes pick up it's audio on the low end of the FM dial.
That's not accurate. The crossover is only at the low end of the FM dial, and it's the audio portion of TV channel 6. When O&A were on terrestrial radio, there was a radio station in New York City that was actually licensed as a TV station, but you could pick up their audio on FM 87.x
 

HandPanzer

Shantih Shantih Shantih
#12
I don't need a shortwave radio. I simply pick up broadcasts with my dental fillings.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
#13
I imagine that the only people still broadcasting on short wave radios fall into 4 categories...

- Political dissidents trapped in totalitarian shitholes like N. Korea and China.
- Jesus lunatics
- Tinfoil hat/survivalist lunatics
- Old relics who can't figure out the dadgum internets doohickey, and are still amazed that they can hear all the way to Burma on their Marconi box on a clear night.
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#14
That's not accurate. The crossover is only at the low end of the FM dial, and it's the audio portion of TV channel 6. When O&A were on terrestrial radio, there was a radio station in New York City that was actually licensed as a TV station, but you could pick up their audio on FM 87.x
The way he explained it, the entire FM dial was there but the TV attenuators were not designed to tune them in. I know in Orlando you could pick up the CBS affiliate on the low end of the FM dial.
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
#15
The way he explained it, the entire FM dial was there but the TV attenuators were not designed to tune them in. I know in Orlando you could pick up the CBS affiliate on the low end of the FM dial.
I think it's the other way around. Channels 2 through 6 are on more or less contiguous frequencies, then comes the entire FM band, then a bunch of other shit, then channels 7 through 13. So if your TV's tuner didn't roll off quickly enough after channel 6, then you could conceivably get the all of FM with some judicious upward fine tuning.

The entire FM band is not "a tiny sliver" of the TV dial. There's just that tiny overlap at 87-88. Contrary to what Don says, the FCC isn't that retarded.
 
#16
Hbb has it right about FM, the overlapping TV channels are 95-97 (90-108 mhz frequency wise is at the upper half of the FM spectrum) which is why they generally aren't used. Just like in hotels they avoid tv channels 19 and 20 because there are some conflicting devices out there that mess theses channels up. In the all analog sd days a citywide cableco would likely put dud "free" channels there so they would get less complaints about poor reception.
 
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