Cop faces firing after stopping beating.

Josh_R

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#1
Video at the link
Bogota Officer May Be Fired For Stopping Beatdown

By KIRSTIN COLE
pix11.com | @colekirstin
9:14 p.m. EDT, April 16, 2012

Plenty of cop "beat downs" can be found online, but how often does the officer who stops others from handing out the beating get fired for it? That's exactly what's happening to Officer Regina Tasca in the Bogota Police Department.

Tasca's dashboard camera captured her as she attempted to stop two officers from beating an emotionally disturbed young man. Just days after the incident, she was told she was being suspended with pay. A year later, her trial is about to begin as the Bogota PD seeks to fire her.

In Bogota, officers control whether or not their dashboard camera rolls. Fortunately, when Officer Tasca responded to a call in April 2011, she clicked her unit "on." The black-and-white tape captures it all--a mother, Tara, screaming for police to stop punching her son on their front lawn. She had called to have her emotionally disturbed son Kyle taken to the hospital. Bogota police responded while waiting for the ambulance. Tasca was the sole officer on the road that day, so she called for back-up according to protocol. Ridgefield Park police then sent two officers. Tasca had just completed her state-mandated training for working with emotionally disturbed citizens.

Tasca described what we see on the videotape: "The Ridgefield Park officer automatically charges and takes him down to the ground. I was quite shocked. As he's doing that, another Ridgefield Park officer flies to the scene in his car, jumps out and starts punching him in the head."

On the tape you can hear Tara, the mother, and Kyle, her son, screaming, "Why are you punching him?" and "Stop punching me!"

The two Ridgefield Park Sergeants are never heard refuting the claims that they punched the 22 year-old man as he was waiting for an ambulance.

Even worse, Kyle was never charged, nor arrested, for any offense. Tasca says it's because he never threatened, did not have a weapon, and indeed never resisted and was not violent. Eventually Tasca was able to pry the punching Ridgefield Park officer off Kyle, as seen in a picture taken by the Kyle's mother, who also later commended Tasca in a phone call.

The call came in to Tasca's answering machine and was kept on a recording: "Thank you Regina. I appreciate you standing up for him, for protecting him while the officer attacked him. I can't figure out what i would have done without you at the scene."

Catherine Elston is the attorney helping Tasca prepare for a week-long departmental trial. Elston is also a former police officer.

"This was excessive force used against an emotionally disturbed person," she said. "This was an unlawful tackle, this was a punching an emotionally disturbed person whose arms were pinned under his chest with his face pushed into the ground."

What happened next is so baffling to so many.

Tasca's voice began to waiver as she recounted the meeting with her superior officer:

"The next thing I know he asks me to turn over my weapon and be sent for a fitness for duty exam," she said.

Bogota PD, after hearing Tasca's story, believes she is psychologically incompetent to be a police officer, and she is being sent for testing. The Ridgefield Park Police officers seen tackling and punching an emotionally disturbed man waiting for an ambulance are never questioned. never interviewed by an Internal Affairs Investigator, and are still working the streets today.


Bogota Police chose to suspend Tasca, an 11-year veteran with numerous commendations. There are photographs from the hospital documenting the bruises on the 22-year-old's head, back, arms and wrists.

Tasca says the real reason she's being called out on these charges is she crossed the "blue line" by refusing to support another officer even when he used excessive force. The other problem? The Bogota Police Department is very small--fewer than 20 officers. And there, she is a definitive minority.

Tasca spells it out: "I'm the only female--the first female ever--and the first and only gay female also." When asked if she feels targeted because of her sex and her sexual orientation, she doesn't hesitate in here answer: "Yes."

The trial, to be in front of a retired judge who will be the sole decision maker, starts Tuesday.

"If another officer is using excessive force, it's my duty to make sure you stop it. and that's what I did," says Tasca about her actions.

But attorney Elston, a veteran of "the job" knows even more. "They're not just terminating her. They're destroying her reputation."
http://www.wpix.com/news/wpix-officer-may-be-fired-after-stopping-beatdown,0,2795580.story

Ok, question for the cops on here. Do you guys get ANY training in dealing with people with medical problems? One would assume that police responding to someone with a medical issue would use some caution and have a little more care for the situation. Are you trained to recognize when someone is suffering a medical condition, instead of just being an asshole? This is about the 4th recent case I have read about someone with a medical problem getting the shit kicked out of them/ killed by the cops. A schizophrenic that was beaten to death, a diabetic was beaten, a guy whose life-alert pendant went off was shot to death, an old man with dementia was beaten...
 

kidconnor

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#2
Yes. Isolate and contain. Sometimes that's not possible.

And we need a pc term for retart strength. That's IS a factor.
 

Motor Head

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#3
[YT]amrYSVpGRxA[/YT]
There is a trial going on for a guy that punched an Omaha Police Officer in the back of the head. The mans cousin had just died in the emergency room after being shot and he went ape shit. There were a dozen Omaha officers standing right there when he did it. The jumped on the guy. When all was said and done, two officers were fired, both of them were woman and fired for continuing to kick the man. The guy on the ground was screaming moonbat crazy. The video doesn't have sound, but this guy was cursing officers.

So in short, yes we are trained to deal with crazy people...but shit happens when you resist arrest with violence. Anybody notice a state trooper in that video? When he saw the woman officers kicking the suspect he decided to stay the fuck out of it.
 

Josh_R

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#4
[YT]amrYSVpGRxA[/YT]
There is a trial going on for a guy that punched an Omaha Police Officer in the back of the head. The mans cousin had just died in the emergency room after being shot and he went ape shit. There were a dozen Omaha officers standing right there when he did it. The jumped on the guy. When all was said and done, two officers were fired, both of them were woman and fired for continuing to kick the man. The guy on the ground was screaming moonbat crazy. The video doesn't have sound, but this guy was cursing officers.

So in short, yes we are trained to deal with crazy people...but shit happens when you resist arrest with violence. Anybody notice a state trooper in that video? When he saw the woman officers kicking the suspect he decided to stay the fuck out of it.
That honestly didn't look that bad, except the guy who was still kicking him in the head at :50. The difference is, this guy actually attacked someone. In the examples I gave, the people hadn't done anything wrong. In the OP, the cops knew they were responding to a guy with a medical problem and immediately attacked him before he did anything to anyone else.

I know most of you guys are great at your job, but you almost never hear a story about a cop stepping in and stopping one of their own when they are obviously over reacting. That video you posted didn't show a single cop stopping the women from kicking that guy once he was restrained.
 

Creasy Bear

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Does it really matter if somebody is e-tard-rayed or just a belligerent asshole? A problem child is a problem child. It shouldn't matter that he came off the long bus or the short bus, the procedure for handling a combative person should be standard procedure in either situation.
 

Creasy Bear

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Just watched the vid... meh. Where I went to school we had a name for a tussle of that sort... we called it "recess".
 

Josh_R

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#7
Does it really matter if somebody is e-tard-rayed or just a belligerent asshole? A problem child is a problem child. It shouldn't matter that he came off the long bus or the short bus, the procedure for handling a combative person should be standard procedure in either situation.
So, a person suffering from a diabetic episode, where they are incoherent and physically unable to comply with police commands should be punched in the face and kicked before being cuffed?

BTW, I don't think that kicking a person in the face should ever be considered an acceptable police tactic.

[video=youtube;3OLQMImO5N0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OLQMImO5N0&feature=related[/video]
 

Creasy Bear

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So, a person suffering from a diabetic episode, where they are incoherent and physically unable to comply with police commands should be punched in the face and kicked before being cuffed?
I'm not talking about the situation in the video above... that was OBVIOUS police brutality bullshit. There was no "combative subject"... retarded or otherwise... and there certainly wasn't any sort of diabetic tomfoolery involved.

Furthermore... an incoherent person who is unable to comply with commands wouldn't exactly be "combative" now would they?

I wrangled a few diabetics(or "breakdancers" as we called them) back in my volunteer ambulance corps days, and I certainly wouldn't classify that as "combat".
 

Motor Head

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That honestly didn't look that bad, except the guy who was still kicking him in the head at :50. The difference is, this guy actually attacked someone. In the examples I gave, the people hadn't done anything wrong. In the OP, the cops knew they were responding to a guy with a medical problem and immediately attacked him before he did anything to anyone else.

I know most of you guys are great at your job, but you almost never hear a story about a cop stepping in and stopping one of their own when they are obviously over reacting. That video you posted didn't show a single cop stopping the women from kicking that guy once he was restrained.
I watched that video and can't tell exactly what happened. I never trust the press to report the truth when a question of excessive force is brought up. But it seems that for whatever reason an officer went hands on, and kooky pants resisted which does result in an elevated use of force. The one picture of the female officer trying to back off the other officer is hardly the "a'ha!" moment for the situation. The fact that the kooky pants wasn't armed is a moot point. If I have to go hands on with anybody, I assume they are armed and if they resist they are going down. She can question the other officer's judgement AFTER the subject is placed in cuffs, not during the take down.

I've seen two videos were a diabetic was forcibly removed from a vehicle because the officers thought they were drunk drivers. Unfortunately it happens. It's one of the reasons that type 1 diabetics should have some sort of signage on their vehicles.
 

Creasy Bear

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So, a person suffering from a diabetic episode, where they are incoherent and physically unable to comply with police commands should be punched in the face and kicked before being cuffed?

BTW, I don't think that kicking a person in the face should ever be considered an acceptable police tactic.

[video=youtube;3OLQMImO5N0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OLQMImO5N0&feature=related[/video]
I'll respond to the ninja edit...

Yeah, I'll give you that the kick to the face was a tad in-cordial. But as far as the guy taking a drubbing because the officers mistook his diabetic antics for belligerence... oh fucking well... it walked like a duck and quacked like a duck.

That'll teach you to keep your blood sugar levels under control, Mister Sweet Tooth.
 

Josh_R

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I watched that video and can't tell exactly what happened. I never trust the press to report the truth when a question of excessive force is brought up. But it seems that for whatever reason an officer went hands on, and kooky pants resisted which does result in an elevated use of force. The one picture of the female officer trying to back off the other officer is hardly the "a'ha!" moment for the situation. The fact that the kooky pants wasn't armed is a moot point. If I have to go hands on with anybody, I assume they are armed and if they resist they are going down. She can question the other officer's judgement AFTER the subject is placed in cuffs, not during the take down.

I've seen two videos were a diabetic was forcibly removed from a vehicle because the officers thought they were drunk drivers. Unfortunately it happens. It's one of the reasons that type 1 diabetics should have some sort of signage on their vehicles.
I watched the original video again, and it is unclear what happened at the very beginning. The female cop said the male basically ran straight from his car and tackled the guy. The video starts just a split second before the tackle, so it is very difficult to tell what led up to it. I'll give you that. My main complaint is that there often seems to be very little assessment of the situation before people get tackled or shot. I don't think I need to post the video of a drug raid where the swat team kills a guy from 10 feet away because he was holding a golf club, and he hits the ground before anyone even yells "drop the weapon". I understand that cops want to make it home to their families at night, but I think that a lot of situations could be safely assessed before initiating force.

THP, What if the diabetic guy had reached into his pocket while the cop had his gun drawn? I would almost guarantee he would have fired on the guy immediately. Reaching for anything (no matter the person's medical or mental state) is pretty much a death sentence.
 

kidconnor

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I don't think I need to post the video of a drug raid where the swat team kills a guy from 10 feet away because he was holding a golf club, and he hits the ground before anyone even yells "drop the weapon". I understand that cops want to make it home to their families at night, but I think that a lot of situations could be safely assessed before initiating force.

THP, What if the diabetic guy had reached into his pocket while the cop had his gun drawn? I would almost guarantee he would have fired on the guy immediately. Reaching for anything (no matter the person's medical or mental state) is pretty much a death sentence.

Hey Josh.. how Long should they wait? Until the golf club comes swinging? Until the gun is pointed at them? I get you can't just blast away at any move someone makes but this is why I always say follow what's being told to you by the police and, more likely than not, there won't be a problem. And by problem I mean blood and death shit.

And i'll take it a step further. You see those uniforms around.. hands up, shut up, don't move. No problems what so ever.




Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Tapatalk 2
 

Josh_R

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Hey Josh.. how Long should they wait? Until the golf club comes swinging? Until the gun is pointed at them? I get you can't just blast away at any move someone makes but this is why I always say follow what's being told to you by the police and, more likely than not, there won't be a problem. And by problem I mean blood and death shit.

And i'll take it a step further. You see those uniforms around.. hands up, shut up, don't move. No problems what so ever.

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Tapatalk 2
Actually, yes. Wait until the club is swinging. A swat team member in full gear has very little to fear from a guy with a golf club. Especially if said guy is across the room. Apparently I do need to post the video. One guy in boxer shorts with a golf club is about 10 feet away from FULLY ARMORED swat team members, and they decide they need to kill him BEFORE even telling him to "get on the ground". They tell him to get on the ground after they pump three rounds into him and he falls dead.

[video=youtube;iFEHlkr0lHs]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFEHlkr0lHs[/video]

BTW, this shooting was ruled as being justified.
 

KRSOne

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Actually, yes. Wait until the club is swinging. A swat team member in full gear has very little to fear from a guy with a golf club. Especially if said guy is across the room. Apparently I do need to post the video. One guy in boxer shorts with a golf club is about 10 feet away from FULLY ARMORED swat team members, and they decide they need to kill him BEFORE even telling him to "get on the ground". They tell him to get on the ground after they pump three rounds into him and he falls dead.

BTW, this shooting was ruled as being justified.
The massah shooting a slave in his own home is always good. Its fact that they are lowering standards to be a cop so we will see more and more of this stuff. Some of these dummies can't even get the correct address so they end up raiding the wrong house and killing your dog for drug nonsense. End the war on drugs or restrict these raids so they can only happen when there is an actual victim.

House that was supposed to be raided was next door to where the dog lived

A Philadelphia Police officer shot and killed a dog at a West Philadelphia residence he mistook for the target of a drug raid.

The officer entered the wrong home on the 4200 block of Pennsgrove Street Wednesday night when a dog in the house bit the officer on the ankle, according to police. The officer fired his gun four times and killed the dog.

The target house of the drug raid was next door, according to authorities.

The officer who was bitten on the ankle was brought to the Presbyterian Hospital. His condition is not yet known.
 

Josh_R

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#16
The massah shooting a slave in his own home is always good. Its fact that they are lowering standards to be a cop so we will see more and more of this stuff. Some of these dummies can't even get the correct address so they end up raiding the wrong house and killing your dog for drug nonsense. End the war on drugs or restrict these raids so they can only happen when there is an actual victim.
I really don't understand how, as a cop, you would barge into an unknown situation where your life might be at risk without even bothering to get the right fucking address. If I am going to put my life on the line (especially for a plant or chemical) I want to know every fucking detail by heart. Citizens and pets aren't the only casualties in the bullshit war on drugs, plenty of cops get themselves killed so someone can't smoke weed or snort coke. What a fucking waste.