Czech crash victim wakes up speaking English

martianvirus

READY THE ANALPROBES!!!!!!!!
Nov 20, 2005
19,062
134
268
Las Vegas, NV
#1
http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,22416798-13762,00.html?from=mostpop

A CZECH speedway driver knocked unconscious in a crash stunned ambulance drivers when he woke up speaking perfect English.

18-year-old Matej Kus was out cold for 45 minutes after the crash, but when he woke up he conversed fluidly in English with paramedics, even speaking in an English accent.

The teenager had just begun to study the language and his skills were described by friends and team-mates as “basic at best”.

Peter Waite, the promoter for Kus's team, the Berwick Bandits, told the Daily Mail: "I couldn't believe what I was hearing.

"It was in a really clear English accent, no dialect or anything. Whatever happened in the crash must have rearranged things in his head.

"Before his crash Matej's use of the English language was broken, to put it mildly.

"He was only just making a start on improving it and struggled to be understood, but was keen to learn.

"Yet here we were at the ambulance door listening to Matej talking to the medical staff in perfect English.

"Matej didn't have a clue who or where he was when he came round. He didn't even know he was Czech.

"It was unbelievable to hear him talk in unbroken English."

Unfortunately, the speedway driver's new found skills didn’t last and he remembers nothing of the accident or the following two days. He is now keen pursue studies in English.

He told the Daily Mail, through an interpreter: "It's unbelievable that I was speaking English like that, especially without an accent.

"Hopefully I can pick English up over the winter for the start of next season so I'll be able to speak it without someone having to hit me over the head first.

"There must be plenty of the English language in my subconscious so hopefully I'll be able to pick it up quickly next time."
Sounds like a case for the x files.
 

Sprite

permanent case of the Moooondays
Apr 27, 2005
3,834
2
0
Jersey
#2
I love hearing stories like this. The human brain never ceases to amaze.

Btw, there's a Madonna joke in here somewhere dammit....
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
22,543
13,852
608
Idaho
#6
But the strange part is, the only thing he ever actually said was Owww.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,468
49,794
644
#7
Another crazy brain language story. http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/...kshire+boy+speaking+like+the+Queen/article.do

The accent transplant: Brain surgery leaves Yorkshire boy speaking like the Queen
17.09.07

With her nine-year-old son William lying desperately ill in hospital following emergency brain surgery, Ruth McCartney-Moore prayed that she would one day hear his voice again.

But when he did speak weeks later, she was in for a shock.

He had lost his strong Yorkshire accent and was now speaking the Queen's English.

"We noticed that he had started to elongate his vowels in words like 'bath' which he never did before," said Mrs McCartney-Moore, 45, a music teacher from York.

"He no longer has short vowel sounds - they are all long. It's bizarre."

William was taken to hospital after suffering a fit in March last year.

"It all began with a headache," said Mrs McCartney-Moore, whose husband Barry is an IT consultant.

"William said his head really hurt above one eye and he had a high temperature.

"There was a bug going around school, so my husband and I didn't think it was any more than that. But a few days later he had a massive seizure."

Doctors discovered he had an abscess on his brain, known as a subdural empyema, which is caused by a rare strain of meningitis. He needed a lifethreatening operation to remove the fluid.

"All the doctors and surgeons thought he was going to die - nobody thought he was going to come out of surgery," added his mother.

"Before he went in I cut off a lock of his hair to keep."

Following the operation William, a pupil at Hempland Primary School in York, was in hospital for more than four weeks. He lost the ability to read and write and his memory was also affected.

But remarkably he was able to play the piano and trumpet much better than before.

After he came out of hospital William went on a family holiday to Northumberland with his parents and brothers Alex, 16, and Edward, 15.

"William was playing on the beach," said Mrs McCartney-Moore.

"He suddenly said, 'Look, I've made a sand castle' but really stretched the vowels out, which made him sound really posh.

"We all just stared back at him - we couldn't believe what we had just heard because he had a northern accent before his illness.

"But the strange thing was that he had no idea why we were staring at him - he just thought he was speaking normally."

Mrs McCartney-Moore, who took 18 months off work to nurse her son back to health, added: "He went from being such a bright, lovely, wonderful boy who was confident and socially aware, to being like a two-year-old who followed me everywhere like a toddler.

"It was such a shock because he had always been such a sparky, healthy little boy."

William has since returned to normal in everything but the way he speaks.

Brain surgeon Paul Eldridge, who works at the specialist Walton Neurological Centre, Liverpool, said it was possible that the infection and abscess had affected the area of the brain which controls language skills, forcing William to learn how to speak again.

"It's as if he's re-learnt how to talk from listening to language from sources different to those that prompted his speech first time around."

Phil Edge, head of therapy at the brain injury charity, Brainwave, said: "I've heard of other patients developing changes in their speech or behaviour following a head injury or brain surgery, but not quite to this extent that an accent completely changes.

"Usually, a person's speech changes in pitch or tone, but it's interesting that this boy's lost his Yorkshire dialect completely.

"Obviously there has been some change to the central speech centre of his brain which has caused differences in how it is functioning now, compared with before the operation."

Last week the Daily Mail revealed how Czech speedway rider Matej Kus started speaking fluent English after he was knocked unconscious in a racing accident.

Despite knowing only basic English phrases before the crash, the 18-year-old, who made a full recovery, was able to chat with paramedics as they treated his injuries.
 

martianvirus

READY THE ANALPROBES!!!!!!!!
Nov 20, 2005
19,062
134
268
Las Vegas, NV
#8
People have similar things happen with other organ transplants, such as the heart. I've heard of people getting the memories of the donor. Strange things happen with our bodies.