Donald Trump Questions Vaccines, Trendies Call Him A Zero

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#1
Why Bill Gates Is A Hero And Donald Trump Is A Zero

Donald Trump just went on CNBC and argued that vaccines are causing autism. The claims went unchallenged. He said:
Autism is so prevalent today. I’ve been saying this for a long time, that the — I’m not against vaccination but I’m against massive vaccinations at one time in order to save doctor visits with the doctors. and frankly, a lot of people love that and some people didn’t look it. My attitude is if you spread the vaccinations over a period of time, what do we have to lose? Autism is so prevalent.
Trump has been making similar claims on Fox and Friends and on Twitter. On TwitLonger, he made the following summation of his position:
I’ve gotten many letters from people fighting autism thanking me for stating how dangerous 38 vaccines on a baby/toddler under 24 months are. It is totally insane – a baby cannot handle such tremendous trauma. Now they come up with this ridiculous study blaming obesity in the mother. The FDA should immediately stop heavy dose vaccinations and you will see a huge decrease in children with autism. What do they have to lose—nothing—but plenty to gain if I am correct. There is great dishonesty about autism!
Luckily for me, someone smarter and richer than Trump — twenty times richer – has already done the bulk of the job of correcting this statement. On national television, no less.
Cue Bill Gates, from his 2011 CNN interview with Sanjay Gupta, on the retracted paper by Dr. Andrew Wakefield that helped kick off the idea of a vaccine-autism link:
Gates: Well, Dr. Wakefield has been shown to have used absolutely fraudulent data. He had a financial interest in some lawsuits, he created a fake paper, the journal allowed it to run. All the other studies were done, showed no connection whatsoever again and again and again. So it’s an absolute lie that has killed thousands of kids. Because the mothers who heard that lie, many of them didn’t have their kids take either pertussis or measles vaccine, and their children are dead today. And so the people who go and engage in those anti-vaccine efforts — you know, they, they kill children. It’s a very sad thing, because these vaccines are important.
Just to emphasize that: “an absolute lie that has killed thousands of kids.” Gates, through the work of his foundation, has seen the impact that these vaccines can have. Hundreds of thousands of kids still die of measles every year worldwide because they don’t get measles vaccine. In a few countries, there are still cases of polio. If we stopped vaccinating, it would come back here. Whooping cough is making a comeback, perhaps partly because of weaknesses in the vaccine, but also because some people are choosing not to get kids their shots. Trump’s statement that we have nothing to lose by trying out giving fewer vaccines, or even changing the vaccine schedule, which makes it more likely that kids will miss shots, is simply wrong. If there were a link between vaccines and autism, we would be faced with a terrible choice: choosing whether children would get autism, or whether children would die.

Thankfully, we don’t face that choice. At one point, the worry was that overdoses of thimerosal, a mercury-containing preservative in vaccines, was causing autism; that preservative is no longer in routine childhood vaccines. But there are no data supporting this worry. Large studies have failed to show any signal that getting more vaccines makes it more likely that kids will be diagnosed as autistic. When I profiled Bill Gates last year, I remember him telling me that scientific proof just wasn’t enough to get rid of this connection in some people’s minds.

“Some scientific myths like the thimerosal thing are hard to get rid of entirely,” Gates said. ”You know, it’s just hard to have everybody look at the data, which couldn’t be clearer on the fact that that is not associated with the increase in autism.”

These kinds of worries hit us right in parts of our brains that have little to do with the analysis of data from scientific studies. When my kids got their shots, I remember being nervous about the autism link, even though I didn’t believe it. Because when you’re holding an infant, the thought that you might be doing something to hurt them is simply terrifying. It takes work to make it go away. But no one is helped if we keep following blind alleys. It would be better to put more effort to make sure that kids with autism spectrum disorders are diagnosed as early as possible, so that therapists can do more to help them.

On one point, I do agree with Trump:linking the rise in autism to obesity is a stretch at this point. I think most of the reporting on this topic makes us seem farther along in finding answers than we actually are. For instance, reports that we may have finally found some genetic changes that may cause autism in some kids probably went too far, as UC-Berkeley biologist Michael Eisen details here. His take: all we’ve learned is that kids with autism have more genetic mutations than those without, but we don’t know if something is causing the mutations and the autism, or if the mutations are causing the autism, or if there is some other explanation. Scientists studying autism are climbing a giant mountain and have only the tiniest handholds.

I also understand that many people don’t want to trust vaccine makers like Merck, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi-Aventis, and Novartis, because they are for-profit companies and have behaved badly in the past. But trusting Trump seems like a stretch here, too. We should at least admit that medicine is more complicated than an episode of “The Apprentice.”

Update:
For those who have not been following this debate closely for years, here are some studies showing that there is not a link between autism and vaccines, or the MMR vaccine in particular. The Institute of Medicine concluded that the evidence favored rejecting any relationship between MMR vaccine and autism. I’d also refer people to this study from NEJMand this one from JAMA.
[video=youtube;04pJdaFOwgQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04pJdaFOwgQ[/video]
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,648
8,818
693
Loveland, CO
#6
Donald Trump got tired of fooling conservatives with his aborted Presidential run so now he has to find a new bunch of retards to worship him.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,158
3,687
393
Constant sate of misery
#7
As long as you say so.
Andrew Wakefield the British doctor who originally claimed that Vaccines cause Autism was discredited and his license to practice medicine was revoked when it was found out that he made most of the data in the experiment up.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/new-health/andre-picard/article1859560.ece
Medical fraud revealed in discredited vaccine-autism study
ANDRÉ PICARD | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 06, 2011 8:06AM EST
Last updated Thursday, Jan. 06, 2011 8:36AM EST

277 comments

Email
0
Print/License
Decrease text size Increase text size

On Feb. 28, 1998, The Lancet published a research paper entitled “Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children.”

It was a blockbuster.

Gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield and associates examined the cases of 12 children with bowel disease, nine of whom suffered “behavioural abnormalities” shortly after receiving the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.
More related to this story

If only there were a shot against irrational fears
Study that linked autism and vaccinations retracted
Vaccines, autism and The Lancet's retraction

The paper suggested that the MMR vaccine triggered autism, particularly in children with intestinal abnormalities. The “new syndrome” they had discovered was named enteritis/disintegrative disorder.

Dr. Wakefield said the vaccine was dangerous and called for an end to MMR vaccination – the cornerstone of childhood immunization programs. He wanted it replaced by three separate shots.

The media – and Britain’s infamous tabloids in particular – were all over it.

It was a perfect storm of a story, coming as it did when autism rates were soaring, parents were tiring of seeing their children become pin-cushions for vaccines, and a new communications tool called the Internet was booming.

Scientists around the world diligently tried to reproduce the findings but never found any evidence of a link between MMR vaccine and autism.

With the passage of time, it became abundantly clear that the research was profoundly flawed, scientifically and ethically.

Still, Dr. Wakefield became the darling of anti-vaccinationists and a hero to parents desperately searching for answers to their children’s autism. He painted himself as a pioneering scientist who was being persecuted by Big Bad Pharma.

Dr. Wakefield, it turns out, was something else altogether. He was on the payroll of a group that has launched a lawsuit against manufacturers of the MMR vaccine – at $230 an hour – and his research was going to be the centrepiece of their claim. He patented a measles vaccine that he wanted to replace the MMR shot. (Later, he founded an autism research centre in Texas.) We know this, in large part, because of the diligent work of a single investigative journalist.

In 2004, Brian Deer of The Sunday Times published damning evidence about Dr. Wakefield’s ties to the lawsuit, showing that the children in the study were recruited unethically, and exposing other flaws in the published study.

As a result of that exposé, Dr. Wakefield was eventually investigated by Britain’s General Medical Council and stripped of his licence to practise because of dishonesty. (The second author, Dr. John Walker-Smith, also lost his licence to practise medicine.) In February, 2010, the original Lancet paper was retracted. But Dr. Wakefield continues to insist the findings are valid and that he is the victim of a vast conspiracy. Yet he has never been able to reproduce the findings.

Now, thanks again to Brian Deer, we know why.

In this week’s edition of the British Medical Journal, the journalist shows, beyond a shadow of doubt, that Dr. Wakefield’s work was not just scientifically flawed but “an elaborate fraud.”

It is troubling enough that so much credence was given to a study that involved only 12 children from a single clinic in the first place. But it turns out that Dr. Wakefield recruited them selectively to fit his thesis – largely from members of an anti-vaccination group called JABS.

Mr. Deer found that every single one of the 12 cases reported in the original Lancet paper was misrepresented; medical records, diagnoses and medical histories were altered to ensure that the symptoms of autism arose within two weeks of MMR vaccination.

Three of the nine children reported with regressive autism did not have autism at all. Despite the claim that all 12 children were “previously normal,” five had documented developmental problems long before their shots. In nine cases, the children did not have bowel abnormalities but the records were altered.

Remember, the paper claimed that all the symptoms began, on average, within six days of MMR vaccination. In fact they occurred months, sometimes years, before and after vaccination.

Parents of 11 of the 12 children blamed MMR vaccine for their children’s health problems before they were recruited. In fact, all were referred by anti-vaccine campaigners and the study was commissioned and funded by a lawyer who planned a class-action lawsuit.

Perhaps most damning of all is the revelation that two years before the Lancet paper was published, Richard Barr, the lawyer who hired Dr. Wakefield to help with the class-action lawsuit against vaccine makers, sent a letter to his clients looking for children with bowel disorders and autism.

In other words, Dr. Wakefield already had the makings of a syndrome he was going to “discover” two years later – and the “proof” he needed for a lawsuit – and recruited study participants accordingly.

Research fraud happens, though rarely on this scale. The real tragedy is that many otherwise intelligent people have come to believe the purported MMR-autism link, and the health of a lot of children has been endangered as a result.

In Britain, childhood vaccination rates fell to as low as 80 per cent, allowing a return of measles, mumps and rubella. Thankfully, those rates are climbing back up again.

It is hard to imagine that the greed and arrogance of one man could do so much damage.

Hopefully, the diligent work of Mr. Deer has put the final nail in the coffin of Dr. Wakefield’s career of fraud and deception.
They don't cause Autism.
[video=youtube;ap_0uQDbZl4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ap_0uQDbZl4[/video]
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
143,058
50,481
644
#8
Believing Donald Trump is the craziest thing Kirk has spewed.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#9
Andrew Wakefield the British doctor who originally claimed that Vaccines cause Autism was discredited and his liscence to practice medicine was revoked when it was found out that he made most of the data in the experiment up.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/new-health/andre-picard/article1859560.ece

They don't cause Autism.
If Psyop says so, it must be true.

[video=youtube;S2UhS4k5FhE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=S2UhS4k5FhE#![/video]
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
Donator
Mar 30, 2006
69,623
5,081
568
Wyoming
#10
When Trump talks about real estate I'll listen. When doctors talk about vaccines, I'll listen. Not the other way around.
 

mikeybot

SPANAKOPITA!!!
Jul 25, 2005
19,318
3,602
623
philly
#11
If Psyop says so, it must be true.

[video=youtube;S2UhS4k5FhE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=S2UhS4k5FhE#![/video]
Once again, ignoring that I proved him wrong by going to pick on someone else.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,158
3,687
393
Constant sate of misery
#13
If Psyop says so, it must be true.

[video=youtube;S2UhS4k5FhE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=S2UhS4k5FhE#![/video]
Yeah, ignore a national story, you dumb cunt. Keep being a puppet of Alex Jones and the cunts that run age of autism.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#14
Once again, ignoring that I proved him wrong by going to pick on someone else.
The British elite would never tell a lie. Mr. Trump is asking a valid question, why is autism so prevalent?
 

justifyyourgarb

You drab South Bend cocksuckers are all the same.
Mar 15, 2007
2,773
7
178
#16
Kirk is a Donald Trump fan boy. What a fag.


He's taking on the real issues....but not while Celebrity Apprentice is on. He's got to see if the pop singer serves enough corn dogs to construction workers. What a cheese dick.
 

Neon

ネオン
Donator
Mar 23, 2008
51,824
18,546
513
Kingdom of Charis
#17
Hey Trendipath, wasn't the Black Hand a Serbian organization? Is that a translation?
 

mikeybot

SPANAKOPITA!!!
Jul 25, 2005
19,318
3,602
623
philly
#19
The British elite would never tell a lie. Mr. Trump is asking a valid question, why is autism so prevalent?
Right, because there aren't a number of other environmental issues or conditions that haven't existed until recently in human history.
Trump barely does well in real estate.
He's a blowhard and not qualified to speak on the matter other than to draw attention to himself. Which sounds a lot like someone else around here.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#20
Right, because there aren't a number of other environmental issues or conditions that haven't existed until recently in human history.
Trump barely does well in real estate.
He's a blowhard and not qualified to speak on the matter other than to draw attention to himself. Which sounds a lot like someone else around here.
I'm happy he fired it should have been done a lot sooner
Lisa Lampanelli
He can't have someone like that working for him.
 

mikeybot

SPANAKOPITA!!!
Jul 25, 2005
19,318
3,602
623
philly
#21
I'm happy he fired it should have been done a lot sooner
Lisa Lampanelli
He can't have someone like that working for him.
As you're trying to change the subject, I will just accept that as you are saying that I have proven you wrong once again.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,158
3,687
393
Constant sate of misery
#22
Hey Trendipath, wasn't the Black Hand a Serbian organization? Is that a translation?
Sicilian. They were mostly done by Mafiosi or Neapolitan Comorra groups. Those type of letters fell out of favor by the early 1920's. And it is a translation from a book, a lot of them are oddly written.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,158
3,687
393
Constant sate of misery
#23
Some old guy or....

[nsfw]
[/nsfw]

BTW they took thimerosal out of most vaccines. The guy in your video admits it.
Yeah, did you see where he said even after the thimerisol was removed Autism rates continue to rise. And that "old guy" is a neurologist, and Director of General Neurology at Yale University School of Medicine
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#24
As you're trying to change the subject, I will just accept that as you are saying that I have proven you wrong once again.
Wrong about what? Sure Mr. Trump does like media attention but its still a valid question.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
13,127
3,031
258
Sunnydale
#25
Yeah, did you see where he said even after the thimerisol was removed Autism rates continue to rise. And that "old guy" is a neurologist, and Director of General Neurology at Yale University School of Medicine
They didn't remove it from all vaccines. Why remove it if its safe? And if its not safe why not remove it from all vaccines?