Drug Agents Use Vast Phone Trove, Eclipsing N.S.A.’s

lajikal

Registered User
Aug 6, 2009
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Nyt
September 1, 2013

For at least six years, law enforcement officials working on a counternarcotics program have had routine access, using subpoenas, to an enormous AT&T database that contains the records of decades of Americans’ phone calls — parallel to but covering a far longer time than the National Security Agency’s hotly disputed collection of phone call logs.

The Hemisphere Project, a partnership between federal and local drug officials and AT&T that has not previously been reported, involves an extremely close association between the government and the telecommunications giant.

The government pays AT&T to place its employees in drug-fighting units around the country. Those employees sit alongside Drug Enforcement Administration agents and local detectives and supply them with the phone data from as far back as 1987.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/02/u...html?partner=rss&emc=rss&smid=tw-nytimes&_r=0
 

Ego

The Only Thing Bigger Than My Head
Feb 15, 2005
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#2
So, is this more of Snowden's info?
 

CougarHunter

Lying causes cat piss smell.
Mar 2, 2006
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#3
It's starting to break that the DEA has been faking investigations in order to fabricate evidence after the fact in order to legally utilize the evidence that the NSA has provided.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
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#5
It's starting to break that the DEA has been faking investigations in order to fabricate evidence after the fact in order to legally utilize the evidence that the NSA has provided.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/05/us-dea-sod-idUSBRE97409R20130805
"PARALLEL CONSTRUCTION"

A former federal agent in the northeastern United States who received such tips from SOD described the process. "You'd be told only, ‘Be at a certain truck stop at a certain time and look for a certain vehicle.' And so we'd alert the state police to find an excuse to stop that vehicle, and then have a drug dog search it," the agent said.

After an arrest was made, agents then pretended that their investigation began with the traffic stop, not with the SOD tip, the former agent said. The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as "parallel construction."

The two senior DEA officials, who spoke on behalf of the agency but only on condition of anonymity, said the process is kept secret to protect sources and investigative methods. "Parallel construction is a law enforcement technique we use every day," one official said. "It's decades old, a bedrock concept."

A dozen current or former federal agents interviewed by Reuters confirmed they had used parallel construction during their careers. Most defended the practice; some said they understood why those outside law enforcement might be concerned.

"It's just like laundering money - you work it backwards to make it clean," said Finn Selander, a DEA agent from 1991 to 2008 and now a member of a group called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, which advocates legalizing and regulating narcotics.

Some defense lawyers and former prosecutors said that using "parallel construction" may be legal to establish probable cause for an arrest. But they said employing the practice as a means of disguising how an investigation began may violate pretrial discovery rules by burying evidence that could prove useful to criminal defendants.