Expect more negative campaigning...Obama attacks on Bain/Romney working: Ipsos Poll

#1
By Gabriel Debenedetti

WASHINGTON | Tue Jul 24,
2012 1:02am EDT


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Sustained attacks
by President Barack Obama's campaign on Republican rival Mitt Romney's business
history and refusal to release more tax records appear to be working, a
Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Tuesday.

More than a third of voters who are registered to a party or as an
independent said in the online survey that what they had heard about Romney's
taxes and his time at Bain Capital private equity firm had given them a less
favorable impression of the Republican candidate.

And particularly worrying for Romney is that a large slice of independent
voters -- whom he needs to win the November 6 election -- are also buying into
the Obama campaign's portrayal of him as a ruthless businessman who may be
hiding something in his taxes.

"With three-quarters of registered voters saying they've heard at least a
little about these issues, I would say the Obama campaign has been successful in
raising them to the national conscience," said Ipsos pollster Julia
Clark.

After weeks of accusations from Obama and his allies that Romney cut U.S.
jobs and sent them overseas while he headed Bain, 36 percent of registered
voters said the issue had made them see Romney less favorably, compared to 18
percent who said they were now more favorable toward the former governor of
Massachusetts.


Among independents, 26 percent regarded him less favorably and 13 percent
more favorably after hearing about his business tenure.

The Romney campaign counters that Obama is trying to distract attention from
the poor economy with frequent ads and speeches about Bain and the Republican's
personal finances.

The Democrats are also calling on Romney to release more tax returns beyond
the two years' worth of information he has given so far. An ad last week
suggested that not being more open about his taxes meant the White House hopeful
had something to hide.

A RIGHT TO KNOW

Almost half of the poll respondents said Americans have a right to know a
presidential candidate's financial history going back many years, while a third
said Romney doesn't need to release any more tax returns and further requests to
do so are an invasion of his privacy.

Among registered voters, 37 percent said what they had heard about Romney's
taxes made them less favorable toward him, while among independents 30 percent
agreed.

The poll results were not all negative for Romney, though. The Republican
holds a 5 percentage point advantage over Obama among registered voters on his
"plan, policy or approach" to the country's economy.

The margin was 36 to 31 percent among registered voters, but 22 to 19 in
favor of Obama among independents.

Americans also showed signs of displeasure about a candidate's taxes becoming
such an important part of the national dialogue. More than half of registered
voters -- 55 percent -- said the debate about Romney's tax returns was a waste
of time, while 45 percent said it was an important part of the
campaign.

But independents, by a margin of 54 to 46, saw Romney's taxes as important in
the fight for the White House.


The poll of 1,195 adults, including 962 registered voters, was taken between
Thursday and Monday.

The precision of Reuters/Ipsos online surveys are measured using a
credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus
or minus 3.3 percentage points for all Americans. For registered voters it was
plus or minus 3.7, and for independents it was plus or minus 8.7.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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#2
Wishful thinking. The part that's right is that dishonest smears will continue from the Obama camp. They're going all out on the class warfare.
 
#3
Wishful thinking. The part that's right is that dishonest smears will continue from the Obama camp. They're going all out on the class warfare.
How is it wishful thinking dude? Its a poll.

Negative campaigning works. Its been proven all over the world in western democracy. It worked for John Howard in Australia, Jean Chretien and Stephen Harper in Canada, Ronald Reagan with his team of Lee Atwater and Ed Rollins, it certainly worked for Bush against Kerry with attack dog Karl Rove, and when McCain showed restraint he got his ass kicked.
 

afternoonquil

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Apr 2, 2011
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#4
The leader of the libs unsheathes his cock shaped sword and grips his rainbow shield tightly. He gallantly leads the non-whites and less fortunate to the hoard of food stamps, government cheese and abortion clinic vouchers.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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#5
How is it wishful thinking dude? Its a poll.
I could commission a poll that shows you know what you're talking about. Sample bias. Question stacking. There are a million ways to get any result you want.

Negative campaigning works. Its been proven all over the world in western democracy. It worked for John Howard in Australia, Jean Chretien and Stephen Harper in Canada, Ronald Reagan with his team of Lee Atwater and Ed Rollins, it certainly worked for Bush against Kerry with attack dog Karl Rove, and when McCain showed restraint he got his ass kicked.
Yes, negative campaigning works. Especially when it's true. Obama's negative ads are never true. That makes them less effective.
 

Party Rooster

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#6
How is it wishful thinking dude? Its a poll.
That's all Don's got when he doesn't like when someone says something bad against his boy Romney, he'll just deflect like he always does. Even though the poll had some good news about Romney in it.

Ipsos doesn't really have a reputation as being biased like PPP does on the left or Rasmussen on the right.
 

Begbie

Wackbag Generalissimo
Jul 21, 2003
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#7
Rarely do I respond to a troll's thread, but this is just too fuckin easy, I'm sorry...I cannot resist...

After weeks of accusations from Obama and his allies that Romney cut U.S.
jobs and sent them overseas while he headed Bain, 36 percent of registered
voters said the issue had made them see Romney less favorably, compared to 18
percent who said they were now more favorable toward the former governor of
Massachusetts.
So 36% of registered voters have a less favorable opinion of Romney after the attack ads. Terrific. So how many of the 36% are actually registered democrats? Honestly, I'm not shocked in the slightest to hear Democrats say they have a less favorable opinion.

That leads us to the Independents...

Among independents, 26 percent regarded him less favorably and 13 percent
more favorably after hearing about his business tenure.
So, these attacks are "working", huh??? Really?! Nice fantasy. This means 74% of Independents are either not swayed by the Obama attack ads or come out of it with a more favorable view of Romney. And they're claiming that appears to be working for the POTUS? Really?! Is Obama trying to lose the election...because that's the only way I see it as working for Obama.

For registered voters it was
plus or minus 3.7, and for independents it was plus or minus 8.7
A credibility interval of 8.7% for Independents? Jeez.

Sure, sure...go ahead...continue with Romney/Bain attack ads...be my guest... :icon_cool
 

NuttyJim

Registered User
Feb 18, 2006
14,114
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#8
I'm tired of all these campaign commercials. Every 5 fucking minute on tv they pop up. Both of them are full of shit, nothing's going to change. It's basically the lesser of 2 evils at this point.

Anyone who believes you can change DC is a sucker.

Status Quo 2012
 

Begbie

Wackbag Generalissimo
Jul 21, 2003
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#9
I'm tired of all these campaign commercials. Every 5 fucking minute on tv they pop up. Both of them are full of shit, nothing's going to change. It's basically the lesser of 2 evils at this point.

Anyone who believes you can change DC is a sucker.

Status Quo 2012
Agreed, it's frustrating.

A few weeks ago, it was the Romney ad mocking Obama's "doing fine" quote...where they repeated Obama's line about 6 times in the ad. Almost every fuckin commercial break. Now it seems to be the Obama ad with Romney singing America The Beautiful. Thought it was clever at first...but seeing it numerous times daily...blech.

The new "Obama saved over a million jobs saving Detroit and the auto industry" is the latest hilarious ad though. Ohmigod...I couldn't believe it when I heard that.
 

Party Rooster

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#10
That leads us to the Independents...

So, these attacks are "working", huh??? Really?! Nice fantasy. This means 74% of Independents are either not swayed by the Obama attack ads or come out of it with a more favorable view of Romney. And they're claiming that appears to be working for the POTUS?
What they're saying is that a couple of weeks ago only about 61% of independents felt that way, but since then a net of about 13% (26% unfavorable to 13% favorable) had a less than favorable view of Romney now. Which is a 2-1 margin, so it seems like they are working.
 

Party Rooster

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#11
The Hill Poll: Voters blame president most for slow economic recovery

By Sheldon Alberts
07/23/12 05:00 AM ET

Two-thirds of likely voters say the weak economy is Washington’s fault, and more blame President Obama than anybody else, according to a new poll for The Hill.

It found that 66 percent believe paltry job growth and slow economic recovery is the result of bad policy. Thirty-four percent say Obama is the most to blame, followed by 23 percent who say Congress is the culprit. Twenty percent point the finger at Wall Street, and 18 percent cite former President George W. Bush.

The results highlight the reelection challenge Obama faces amid dissatisfaction with his first-term performance on the economy.
The poll, conducted for The Hill by Pulse Opinion Research, found 53 percent of voters say Obama has taken the wrong actions and has slowed the economy down. Forty-two percent said he has taken the right actions to revive the economy, while six percent said they were not sure.

Obama has argued throughout the presidential campaign that his policies have made the economy better. He says recovery is taking a long time because he inherited such deep economic trouble upon taking office in 2009.

“The problems we’re facing right now have been more than a decade in the making,” he told an audience last month in Cleveland.

Obama’s campaign, under the slogan “Forward,” has sought to steer voter attention less toward current and past economic performance and more toward questions about Republican Mitt Romney’s work in the private sector economy. It has launched attacks on the challenger’s role as head of the private equity firm Bain Capital, casting him as a jobs “outsourcer” whose firm shipped thousands of U.S. positions overseas.

The Hill Poll, however, shows the extent to which voters hold Obama responsible for the economy and reveals his vulnerability should the election become primarily a referendum on his economic management.

It finds that voters strongly believe more could have been done by the White House and in Congress to achieve growth in the economy and employment.

While 64 percent of voters consider this downturn to be “much more severe” than previous contractions, barely one quarter (26 percent) say the agonizingly slow pace of the recovery was unavoidable.

While voters feel Obama carries a greater portion of the blame than others, the poll found almost 6-in-10 are unhappy with the actions of Republicans in Congress who have challenged the president on an array of policy initiatives.

Fifty-seven percent of voters said congressional Republicans have impeded the recovery with their policies, and only 30 percent overall believe the GOP has done the right things to boost the economy.

The tension between a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and a Democratic-run White House has also featured in Obama’s campaign strategy.

In his economic speech last month in Cleveland, Obama cast the 2012 election as a chance to choose between two competing visions for the nation.

“What’s holding us back is a stalemate in Washington between two fundamentally different views of which direction America should take,” he said. “This election is your chance to break that stalemate.”

Romney agrees that the election is a choice between two radically different views of America, but he characterizes it as a contest between his own vision of an industrious people free to achieve their dreams and Obama’s faith in big government.

If there is a silver lining for Obama in the poll results, it’s that centrist voters, who may well decide the 2012 outcome, tend to blame Republicans in Congress more than the president for hindering a more robust recovery.

Twenty-six percent of centrists cited Congress as most to blame for U.S. economic woes, compared to 20 percent who blame Obama.

Similarly, 53 percent of centrists said Obama has taken the right actions as president to boost the economy, compared with 38 percent who said he had taken the wrong steps.

Seventy-nine percent of centrist voters said Republicans had slowed the economy by taking wrong actions. Only 13 percent of centrists credited GOP lawmakers with policies that have helped the economy.

The poll found sharp differences in opinions along racial lines, with 94 percent of African-Americans saying Obama had taken the right actions on the economy, compared to 34 percent of white voters.

The Hill poll was conducted July 19 among 1,000 likely voters, and has a 3 percentage point margin of error.
http://thehill.com/polls/239377-the-hill-poll-majority-of-voters-blame-president-for-bad-economy
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
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#12
The Hill Poll: Voters blame president most for slow economic recovery

By Sheldon Alberts
07/23/12 05:00 AM ET

Two-thirds of likely voters say the weak economy is Washington’s fault, and more blame President Obama than anybody else, according to a new poll for The Hill.

It found that 66 percent believe paltry job growth and slow economic recovery is the result of bad policy. Thirty-four percent say Obama is the most to blame, followed by 23 percent who say Congress is the culprit. Twenty percent point the finger at Wall Street, and 18 percent cite former President George W. Bush.

The results highlight the reelection challenge Obama faces amid dissatisfaction with his first-term performance on the economy.
The poll, conducted for The Hill by Pulse Opinion Research, found 53 percent of voters say Obama has taken the wrong actions and has slowed the economy down. Forty-two percent said he has taken the right actions to revive the economy, while six percent said they were not sure.

Obama has argued throughout the presidential campaign that his policies have made the economy better. He says recovery is taking a long time because he inherited such deep economic trouble upon taking office in 2009.

“The problems we’re facing right now have been more than a decade in the making,” he told an audience last month in Cleveland.

Obama’s campaign, under the slogan “Forward,” has sought to steer voter attention less toward current and past economic performance and more toward questions about Republican Mitt Romney’s work in the private sector economy. It has launched attacks on the challenger’s role as head of the private equity firm Bain Capital, casting him as a jobs “outsourcer” whose firm shipped thousands of U.S. positions overseas.

The Hill Poll, however, shows the extent to which voters hold Obama responsible for the economy and reveals his vulnerability should the election become primarily a referendum on his economic management.

It finds that voters strongly believe more could have been done by the White House and in Congress to achieve growth in the economy and employment.

While 64 percent of voters consider this downturn to be “much more severe” than previous contractions, barely one quarter (26 percent) say the agonizingly slow pace of the recovery was unavoidable.

While voters feel Obama carries a greater portion of the blame than others, the poll found almost 6-in-10 are unhappy with the actions of Republicans in Congress who have challenged the president on an array of policy initiatives.

Fifty-seven percent of voters said congressional Republicans have impeded the recovery with their policies, and only 30 percent overall believe the GOP has done the right things to boost the economy.

The tension between a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and a Democratic-run White House has also featured in Obama’s campaign strategy.

In his economic speech last month in Cleveland, Obama cast the 2012 election as a chance to choose between two competing visions for the nation.

“What’s holding us back is a stalemate in Washington between two fundamentally different views of which direction America should take,” he said. “This election is your chance to break that stalemate.”

Romney agrees that the election is a choice between two radically different views of America, but he characterizes it as a contest between his own vision of an industrious people free to achieve their dreams and Obama’s faith in big government.

If there is a silver lining for Obama in the poll results, it’s that centrist voters, who may well decide the 2012 outcome, tend to blame Republicans in Congress more than the president for hindering a more robust recovery.

Twenty-six percent of centrists cited Congress as most to blame for U.S. economic woes, compared to 20 percent who blame Obama.

Similarly, 53 percent of centrists said Obama has taken the right actions as president to boost the economy, compared with 38 percent who said he had taken the wrong steps.

Seventy-nine percent of centrist voters said Republicans had slowed the economy by taking wrong actions. Only 13 percent of centrists credited GOP lawmakers with policies that have helped the economy.

The poll found sharp differences in opinions along racial lines, with 94 percent of African-Americans saying Obama had taken the right actions on the economy, compared to 34 percent of white voters.

The Hill poll was conducted July 19 among 1,000 likely voters, and has a 3 percentage point margin of error.
http://thehill.com/polls/239377-the-hill-poll-majority-of-voters-blame-president-for-bad-economy
 

justifyyourgarb

You drab South Bend cocksuckers are all the same.
Mar 15, 2007
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#13
Bain? Like the Batman villain? Sounds evil.


I know who I'M voting for.
 

Party Rooster

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#15
The negative ads about Romney and Bainare working, but the majority of Americans think Romney will do a better job of handling the economy?

I have to call sha-nay-nay's on the Reuter's poll.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/story/2012-07-23/poll-romney-obama-economy/56439758/1
The poll in the OP also had Romney ahead on the economy.

The poll results were not all negative for Romney, though. The Republican
holds a 5 percentage point advantage over Obama among registered voters on his
"plan, policy or approach" to the country's economy.

The margin was 36 to 31 percent among registered voters
I'm glad you agree with the poll you posted and think Obama's more honest and trustworthy than Romney though. :action-sm

To be sure, Obama retains significant advantages of his own. By 2-1, he's rated as more likable than Romney. By double digits, those surveyed say the president better understands the problems Americans face in their daily lives. He has an 8-percentage-point advantage on being seen as honest and trustworthy.
 
#16
What they're saying is that a couple of weeks ago only about 61% of independents felt that way, but since then a net of about 13% (26% unfavorable to 13% favorable) had a less than favorable view of Romney now. Which is a 2-1 margin, so it seems like they are working.
Jesus Christ someone who knows how to read!
 

Bluestreak

This space intentionally left blank.
Sep 27, 2007
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#19
I know it pains you to hear so, but Barry is a fucking liar surrounded by bigger liars. He's bad, even for a politician, which is saying a lot.
A Politician is a LIAR? That's a shocking, gut-wrenching statement! Way to go out on a limb there, chief.
I'm so glad you know me so well. I Didn't vote for Obama, and haven't voted in a Presidential election since Clinton.
But you know me so well, so please, go back to waxing hyperbole about topics you know little about. It amuses me.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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#22
[citation needed]
Prove it.
Going back over your post history, it seems like you're more focused on ad hominem attacks on me than defending Obama. I guess I said something that hurt your wittwe feewings at some point.
 

Bluestreak

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Sep 27, 2007
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#23
Going back over your post history, it seems like you're more focused on ad hominem attacks on me than defending Obama. I guess I said something that hurt your wittwe feewings at some point.
Hey! Lookit that! You did some basic prep work. Good for you.
You never hurt my feelings, by the way. You have a tendency to use hyperbole and blanket statements quite a bit.