[Exploits?] 11 Georgia educators in jail for standardized test fraud

steve500

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#1
11 Shaniquas are in jail for 20 years for racketeering because they had an organized effort to change test scores. One example is the cheating parties they would have, where they took the tests home and modified them. It took 10 years to get to this point since no one wanted to be an uncle Tom and snitch.

The best the ghetto defense attorney could say is "dey're educators. How can you put an educator in jail?"




ATLANTA — In a major victory for prosecutors, a number of Atlanta educators were found guilty on Wednesday for their roles in a public schools cheating scandal, bringing a close to a half-decade drama that tarnished a major school district’s reputation and raised questions nationwide about the wisdom of pushing educators to improve students’ standardized test scores.

On their eighth day of deliberations, the jurors convicted 11 of the 12 defendants of racketeering, a felony that could put them in prison for decades. Many of the defendants — a mixture of teachers, testing coordinators and administrators — were also convicted of lesser charges, such as making false statements.

Judge Jerry W. Baxter of Fulton County Superior Court ordered most of the educators to be taken into custody immediately, and they were led from the courtroom in handcuffs. Judge Baxter, who presided over a trial that started with opening statements more than six months ago, will begin sentencing hearings next week.

“Our entire effort in this case was simply to get our community to stop and take a look at our educational system,” District Attorney Paul L. Howard Jr. said. “I think because of the decision of this jury today that people will stop. I think people will stop and they will make an assessment of our educational system.”

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Sharon Davis Williams, a former research team director, was led to a holding cell after the verdict.

POOL PHOTO BY KENT D. JOHNSON

Defense lawyers emerged from the courthouse holding their clients’ personal effects, including purses, ties and scarves. One lawyer, George Lawson, who represented Michael Pitts, said the defendants were convicted primarily on the testimony of admitted liars and criminals — people who had already pleaded guilty.

The dozen educators who stood trial, including five teachers and a principal, were indicted in March 2013 after years of questions about how Atlanta students had substantially improved their scores on the Criterion-Referenced Competency Test, a standardized examination given throughout Georgia.

In 2009, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution started a series of articles that sowed suspicion about the veracity of the test scores, and Gov. Sonny Perdue ultimately ordered an investigation.

The findings, which were completed in June 2011, were unsparing: Investigators concluded that cheating had occurred in at least 44 of Atlanta’s schools and that the district had been troubled by “organized and systemic misconduct.” Nearly 180 employees, including 38 principals, were accused of wrongdoing.

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Beverly L. Hall, the former superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools. Investigators said Dr. Hall, who died on March 2, “created a culture of fear, intimidation and retaliation.”

KENDRICK BRINSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

The investigators wrote that cheating was commonplace in individual schools — at one, for instance, a principal wore gloves while she altered answer sheets — but they also said that the district’s top officials, including Superintendent Beverly L. Hall, bore some responsibility.

Investigators wrote in the report that Dr. Hall and her aides had “created a culture of fear, intimidation and retaliation” that had permitted “cheating — at all levels — to go unchecked for years.”

Officials said the cheating allowed employees to collect bonuses and helped improve the reputations of both Dr. Hall, a former administrator in New York City and New Jersey, and the perpetually troubled school district she had led since 1999.

Dr. Hall, who died on March 2, insisted that she had done nothing wrong and that her approach to education, which emphasized data, was not to blame.

“I can’t accept that there is a culture of cheating,” Dr. Hall said in 2011. “What these 178 are accused of is horrific, but we have over 3,000 teachers.”

But in March 2013, a Fulton County grand jury accused Dr. Hall and 34 other district employees of being complicit in the cheating. The indictment accused them of racketeering and other crimes that together carried decades in prison.

Twenty-one of the educators reached plea agreements and detailed their transgressions before Judge Baxter in exchange for lesser punishments, including probation. (Two defendants, including Dr. Hall, died before they could stand trial.)

But 12 defendants chose to go before a jury, and opening statements began in late September. Testimony did not conclude until near the end of February, and jurors began their deliberations on March 19.

On the first of three days of closing arguments, defense lawyers complained that prosecutors had used witnesses who were not reliable. They also told jurors that the state wanted them to use an inappropriately broad interpretation of Georgia’s Racketeer Influenced and Corruption Organizations law, often referred to as a RICO statute.

“This case is garbage,” said Keith E. Adams, a lawyer for a former teacher at Dobbs Elementary School. “It’s a garbage case. It’s a RICO case that means nothing.”

But a prosecutor, Clinton K. Rucker, pleaded with jurors to convict the dozen educators seated across Courtroom 1C.

“We’re not saying these defendants are devils or Satan or anything like that,” he said. “They did a bad thing that affected a whole lot of people.”
 

Creasy Bear

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#2
11 Shaniquas are in jail for 20 years for racketeering because they had an organized effort to change test scores. One example is the cheating parties they would have, where they took the tests home and modified them. It took 10 years to get to this point since no one wanted to be an uncle Tom and snitch.

The best the ghetto defense attorney could say is "dey're educators. How can you put an educator in jail?"


Every single person involved in this is black. 35 people involved... all black.

Here's my personal favorite...

2. Dr. Luscious Brown (Kennedy Middle School)

Violation of Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act
False Statements and Writings (2 counts)

http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/21858299/mug-shots-aps-educators-indicted

It looks like the reason they got caught was because, in typical negro fashion, they got way too greedy. The "success story" of the school district was miraculous. So much so that the Superintendent was lauded as some sort of educational miracle worker. She went around giving seminars and motivational speeches to other inner city school systems about the proper way to educate the "unruly students".

It went on for a good long while... it was pretty obvious what was going on, but the white guilt blindfold was on tight. It finally got so bad that whitey couldn't ignore the monkeyshines anymore, and action was taken.
 

kidconnor

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#3
Doesnt say how they cheated besides one example of changing one students answers with white gloves on.

I wants to know.
 

steve500

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#4
Doesnt say how they cheated besides one example of changing one students answers with white gloves on.

I wants to know.
They had students testifying that they were told what answers to put, and to change answers.


Since the teachers don't actually have the official answer key, I wonder how many they got wrong themselves.
 
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#5
They had students testifying that they were told what answers to put, and to change answers.

Since the teachers don't actually have the official answer key, I wonder how many they got wrong themselves.
The combined brain power of 11 sheboons works out to a B at most.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

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#6
Lordy lordy lord. Hows am I's suppose to deal with prison? I be edumcated...
 

THE FEZ MAN

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Now they can run the GED programs in the pen
 
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#8
Well 35 were arrested/indicted and the smart ones plead out...

Hmmm I wonder if they are gonna have an Easter dinner in Jail this weekend...
 

Creasy Bear

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#9
It was a handful of white devils who discovered the cheating and made it public...

http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/aps-cheating-scandal-how-it-all-began/nW9Gm/

The investigation into the school district's test scores started when a small group of reporters with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noticed odd patterns with Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests scores.

"All the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and its reporters were ever after was the truth," Editor in Chief Kevin Riley told Channel 2's Erin Coleman.
The SJWs slammed them as racists, and there was so much black OUTRAGE, and white guilt pushback, that it took years before heads finally began to roll.

The initial reaction was, 'It's not cheating, we're not doing anything wrong,' and that went on for years, and nobody wanted to believe that things weren't right with AtlantaPublic Schools, and the paper was criticized for years, our reporters were criticized for years."
But, like I said before, the neegs got way too greedy with the cheating.

Those reporters looked at CRCT scores and noticed what was statistically improbable: huge increases in scores.

"There were cases where the chances of that happening were 1 in 10 million or 1 in a billion that kids would naturally make that kind of progress," Riley said.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#10
Ummm wouldn't their test scores like in middle or high school show how they didn't learn nuffin? Or were the tests through elementary to high school "adjusted".
 

gleet

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#11
Judge said admit you did it and I'll go easy on you all. Almost every one insisted their name was Dindu Nuffin.

(CNN)There was nothing routine about a sentencing hearing Tuesday in Atlanta that wrote the final legal chapter of one of the most massive school cheating scandals in the country.

Educators were convicted April 1 of racketeering and other lesser crimes related to inflating test scores of children from struggling schools. One teacher was acquitted.

One by one, they stood, alongside their attorneys, before Fulton County Superior Court Judge Jerry Baxter.

In this system, a jury decides guilt or innocence, the judge metes out punishment.

Throughout the five-month trial, Baxter has been pointed. Until Monday, he said he planned to sentence the educators to prison. When verdicts were reached, he ordered them directly to jail.

But on Monday he changed his mind and decided to allow prosecutors to offer them deals that would have allowed them to avoid the possible 20-year sentence that racketeering carries.

And that's why there were sparks when some of the educators, flanked by their attorneys, did not directly and readily admit their responsibility.

Baxter was not pleased. He raised his voice numerous times and shouted at attorneys. Some attorneys shouted back. At one point, one of the defense lawyers said he might move to recuse the judge and the judge retorted that he could send that attorney to jail.

"Everybody starts crying about these educators. This was not a victimless crime that occurred in this city!" Baxter said.



'Search your soul'


"Everybody knew cheating was going on and your client promoted it," Baxter said to an attorney representing Atlanta Public Schools educator Sharon Davis-Williams, who Baxter sentenced to seven years in prison.

Davis-Williams was ordered to perform 2,000 hours of community service and pay a $25,000 fine.

Repeatedly, Baxter appeared frustrated when more educators did not simply accept the deal and plainly vocalize their guilt.

"These stories are incredible. These kids can't read," he said.

"This is the time to search your soul," Baxter said. "It's just taking responsibility. ... No one has taken responsibility that I can see."

In 2013, a Fulton County grand jury indicted 35 educators from the Atlanta Public Schools district, and more than 20 took a plea deal. Among them were teachers, principals and testing coordinators.

The cheating is believed to date back to 2001, when scores on statewide aptitude tests improved greatly, according to a 2013 indictment. The indictment also states that for at least four years, between 2005 and 2009, test answers were altered, fabricated or falsely certified.

A review that former Gov. Sonny Perdue ordered, determined that some cheating had occurred in more than half the district's elementary and middle schools.

Michael Bowers, a former Georgia attorney general who investigated the cheating scandal, said in 2013 that there were "cheating parties," erasures in and out of classrooms, and teachers were told to make changes to student answers on tests.

"Anything that you can imagine that could involve cheating -- it was done," he said at the time.

During his investigation, he heard that educators cheated out of pride, to earn bonuses, to enhance their careers or to keep their jobs, he said.

The cheating allegedly involved the top educator in the district, ex-Atlanta Public Schools Superintendent Beverly Hall.

Hall said she was innocent. Suffering from cancer, she died before she could stand trial.



The sentences


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's investigative journalism is credited with first examining the corruption within the city's public school system. On Tuesday, the newspaper published photos of each of those who took plea deals and the sentences they received.

* Donald Bullock was first. Witnesses testified that Bullock urged them to change test answers, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The former testing coordinator was ordered to serve five years probation, six months of weekends behind bars, pay a $5,000 fine and perform 1,500 hours of community service. As part of his deal, Bullock agreed to waive his right to appeal.

* Angela Williamson, a former teacher, was ordered to serve two years in prison. She was ordered to pay a $5,000 fine and perform 1,500 hours of community service.

* Pamela Cleveland, a former teacher, was ordered to serve one year home confinement, pay a $1,000 fine and perform 1,000 hours of community service. "I am guilty of the charges against me," Cleveland said in court.

* Michael Pitts, a former schools executive, was accused of telling teachers to cheat and then telling them not to talk to Georgia Bureau of Investigators who were looking into the scandal. He was ordered to serve seven years in prison, perform 2,000 hours of community service and pay a $25,000 fine.

* Tamara Cotman, a former schools administrator, was ordered to serve seven years in prison, pay a $25,000 fine and perform 2000 hours of community service.

* Dana Evans, a former principal, was ordered to serve one year and perform 1,000 hours of community service.

*Tabeeka Jordan, former assistant principal, was ordered to serve two years in prison, perform 1,500 hours of community service and pay $5,000 fine

* Theresia Copeland, a former test coordinator, was ordered to serve one year in prison, perform 1,000 hours of community service and pay a $1,000 fine.

* Diane Buckner-Webb, a former teacher, was ordered to serve one year in prison, perform 1,000 hours of community service and pay a $1,000 fine.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/14/us/georgia-atlanta-public-schools-cheating-scandal-verdicts/
 

steve500

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#12
The video of the sentencing is a HOOT! Nice seeing a white judge put the uppity sheboons and lawyers in their place.
 

Creasy Bear

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Repeatedly, Baxter appeared frustrated when more educators did not simply accept the deal and plainly vocalize their guilt.

"These stories are incredible. These kids can't read," he said.

"This is the time to search your soul," Baxter said. "It's just taking responsibility. ... No one has taken responsibility that I can see."
The black community will take a lot of things, but responsibility isn't one of them.
 

VMS

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Since the teachers don't actually have the official answer key, I wonder how many they got wrong themselves.
That's probably how they were caught. Everyone getting the answers right is one thing. Everyone getting the same 2+2=blue question wrong is when the alarm bells go off.
 

MrAbovePar

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#15
That's probably how they were caught. Everyone getting the answers right is one thing. Everyone getting the same 2+2=blue question wrong is when the alarm bells go off.
There's a lot of wrong info common in the black community. It's obvious if you watch footage captured by police cameras or ask verbal problems like, "If Trayvon has penned George on the group and is punching his head into the concrete. What should George do?". Answer: " Not have gotten outta da car".
 

VMS

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There's a lot of wrong info common in the black community. It's obvious if you watch footage captured by police cameras or ask verbal problems like, "If Trayvon has penned George on the group and is punching his head into the concrete. What should George do?". Answer: " Not have gotten outta da car".
I say it a lot, but given how often African-Americans bump up against the legal system, one would think they would make some kind of attempt to, you know, understand the legal system.

It must be like being a pre-technical savage, living next to a volcano.

"What do you mean I'm up for capital murder? I was just the getaway car driver! I didn't pull the trigger!" type shit.
 

Hoffman

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#17
Well 35 were arrested/indicted and the smart ones plead out...

Hmmm I wonder if they are gonna have an Easter dinner in Jail this weekend...
Which was two. TWO plead out, AFTER the judge pleaded with both sides to come together on a plea agreement with the Defendants admitting their guilt. Then the fucking defendants and their lawyers got pissed when the Judge sentenced them. Don't feel the least bit sorry. You had your chance and you fucking blew it. Would have been under house arrest during the evening or do weekends in jail for a short period. Now you have either five, or twenty years. Tough...fucking...luck.
 

steve500

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#18
Which was two. TWO plead out, AFTER the judge pleaded with both sides to come together on a plea agreement with the Defendants admitting their guilt. Then the fucking defendants and their lawyers got pissed when the Judge sentenced them. Don't feel the least bit sorry. You had your chance and you fucking blew it. Would have been under house arrest during the evening or do weekends in jail for a short period. Now you have either five, or twenty years. Tough...fucking...luck.
And it wasn't even your average plea agreement before a trial thing...The judge tried doing them a favor by letting them simply exchange responsibility for a lesser sentence AFTER THEY WERE FOUND GUILTY! It was literally a case of "I'll give you 20 years, but just say you're sorry and I'll change it to house arrest."

This is why most blacks at least go with a white attorney instead of the affirmative action lawyers these clowns had.
 

steve500

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#19
"What do you mean I'm up for capital murder? I was just the getaway car driver! I didn't pull the trigger!" type shit.
This is why I watch the first 48 and After the First 48. The interviews are gold, especially since they think they're so smart and convincing that they don't need an attorney.
 
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#20
This is why I watch the first 48 and After the First 48. The interviews are gold, especially since they think they're so smart and convincing that they don't need an attorney.
You do need subtitles in some cases though...
 

Madness

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#21
What did they think was going to happen? Was he just going to let them go when they wouldn't take the plea deal?
 
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And it wasn't even your average plea agreement before a trial thing...The judge tried doing them a favor by letting them simply exchange responsibility for a lesser sentence AFTER THEY WERE FOUND GUILTY! It was literally a case of "I'll give you 20 years, but just say you're sorry and I'll change it to house arrest."

This is why most blacks at least go with a white attorney instead of the affirmative action lawyers these clowns had.
Ya I only saw one white guy in that sea of "educators".
 

Creasy Bear

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#23
What did they think was going to happen? Was he just going to let them go when they wouldn't take the plea deal?
It's not even a matter of pride. The Ns are just dumb as hell and they're always perpetual victims who can't even grasp the concept of being in the wrong, and being held accountable for their niggertry.
 

MrAbovePar

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#24
And it wasn't even your average plea agreement before a trial thing...The judge tried doing them a favor by letting them simply exchange responsibility for a lesser sentence AFTER THEY WERE FOUND GUILTY! It was literally a case of "I'll give you 20 years, but just say you're sorry and I'll change it to house arrest."

This is why most blacks at least go with a white attorney instead of the affirmative action lawyers these clowns had.
They see court as figuratively a fight. If their lawyer fights hard enough it means they win. All they need to do is fight hard. They ignore that it's a legal debate about merits of a case and evidence presented. Unfortunately, we've seen how well they debate at the collegiate level.
 

Creasy Bear

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#25
National Superintendent of the Year honor goes to Atlanta woman

San Francisco, Calif., February 20, 2009 – Beverly Hall, superintendent of Atlanta, Ga., Public Schools since 1999, has been named the 2009 National Superintendent of the Year.

“Beverly Hall is an outstanding superintendent whose leadership has turned Atlanta into a model of urban school reform,” said AASA Executive Director Dan Domenech. “Throughout her long and successful tenure in Atlanta, Hall has accomplished significant gains in student achievement.




http://www.fcps.net/news/press-releases/2008-09/super-of-the-year