Favourite foods in the U.S. and why they haven’t taken off around the world

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#1
Some American foods, such as burger and fries, spicy gumbo and mustard-smeared hot dogs, are much loved and have been adopted by other cultures around the world. But what about some of the lesser known U.S. foods? We take a look at some of the dishes that Americans love, but the rest of the world has chosen to ignore, and ask why.

Grits
Grits come from the southern American states, which include Texas, Georgia, Louisiana and South Carolina and are made by boiling ground corn until it reaches a smooth, porridge-like consistency. Grits are commonly eaten for breakfast with eggs, bacon, sprinkled with cheese or butter or just left plain. Foreign visitors to the U.S. that have tried grits during their stay often describe them as bland or gloopy but fans of the creamy treat insist that they must have had a bad experience. Although some specialist restaurants outside of America serve grits, it is rare. It’s interesting that many people describe grits as similar to polenta – which is also made with ground corn but has become a firm menu item on many high-end restaurants around the world. Maybe we should give grits a chance, too?

Root Beer
First brewed in Philadelphia by a pharmacist and introduced to the world in 1876, root beer is popular throughout the US, but outside of America people dismiss its flavour as strongly herbal-based or even similar to antiseptic. American-born 2011 Masterchef winner Tim Anderson told Yahoo!: “Root beer contains a ton of different extracts and oils from various roots, herbs, and spices. A few of them, like sarsaparilla and wintergreen, are traditionally used to flavour medicines in the UK, so some people perceive root beer as tasting overpoweringly medicinal. This is coupled with a typically strong flavour of anethole, the characteristic aroma of liquorice or aniseed, which many people dislike.” If you’re not used to these flavours, says Tim, the drink can be “very off-putting”. Despite this, however, it does trickle into UK supermarkets every now and then.

Scrapple
Thought to have been introduced by European settlers to Pennsylvania, scrapple is still a popular dish in some parts of America. It’s made from pieces of pork offal, which are mixed with cornmeal and baked into a loaf, resembling a coarse paté. Pieces of this loaf are then sliced off and fried until golden. But while scrapple nowadays hasn’t really ventured outside of American shores, it’s not that different in theory from paté or meatloaf – both successful outside of the U.S.

Cornbread
A tough one, this. Why cornbread doesn’t grace dining tables worldwide is a bit of a mystery: it’s sweet, yellow and eggy. Cornbread is especially popular in the southern states and many people see it as a childhood comfort food, eaten with a drink of milk as a snack. Because of its popularity, many variations of cornbread exist. Cooks add everything from green jalapeño chillies, cheese and even honey for a sweeter bread. It’s made by combining cornmeal with eggs and sugar, stirring in some flour and seasonings and then baking it in a hot oven for around half an hour. Perhaps it’s not taken off elsewhere because we didn’t grow up eating it and don’t have that comfort food factor. But while it’s not yet widely available to buy ready-made, more European cooks are buying bags of cornmeal and trying out cornbread recipes at home. Perhaps this is one to watch.

Fried Green Tomatoes
We’ve been conditioned to expect our tomatoes to be shiny, large and ruby red. But the southern states of America came up with a great idea for using up unripe, green tomatoes. Green tomatoes are sliced and dipped in egg followed by breadcrumbs or cornmeal, or a mixture of the two. The coated green tomato slices are then fried for a few minutes on each side, until crisp. You don’t see many fried green tomato dishes on menus on this side of the pond just yet, but British food writer Nigel Slater has devised a number of green tomato-based recipes including fried tomatoes and chutneys; so for the curious, the tide may turn yet.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/headline--...n’t-taken-off-around-the-world-jo-romero.html

The only things I've had on that list are root beer and cornbread
 

Bluestreak

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Sep 27, 2007
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#2
Grits are fantastic if done right, as is polenta.
Not a fan of offal, so I probably won't like scrapple.
Loves me some good cornbread made with some rendered bacon fat.
Fried green tomatoes are a really good time, as long as they're crispy and not soggy.

I'm also a fan of Root Beer - it's the only soft drink I drink on the rare occasion I drink a soda.
Let's get someone else's opinion on Root Beer:
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Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
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Mar 22, 2006
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#3
I had never heard of scrapple until Ronnie B brought it up a few years back. Forget the rest of the world, everything on that list, except Root Beer (maybe Cornbread), isn't popular in the US.
 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
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#4
I had never heard of scrapple until Ronnie B brought it up a few years back. Forget the rest of the world, everything on that list, except Root Beer (maybe Cornbread), isn't popular in the US.
Each one except for Root Beer is only popular in certain areas. None are popular all over. I would say too anywhere scrapple is sold you can buy Birch Beer.
 

fletcher

Darkness always says hello.
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Feb 20, 2006
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#5
Just to get it out of the way now in case it comes up later, its Taylor Ham not pork roll you savages.
 
Dec 25, 2005
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#6
Just to get it out of the way now in case it comes up later, its Taylor Ham not pork roll you savages.
No.. faggot. It's pork roll. If I ask for Taylor Ham in some places, I'll get a ham sandwich.
 

fletcher

Darkness always says hello.
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Feb 20, 2006
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#8
No.. faggot. It's pork roll. If I ask for Taylor Ham in some places, I'll get a ham sandwich.


Well stop going to those places, they are obviously run by savages, you savage.

Second time I have been called a faggot today. Must be doing something right.
 

Hudson

Supreme Champion!!!!!
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Jan 14, 2002
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#11
Pork roll...Taylor a brand..and there are better.
oh and:
even THAT company calls it pork roll...asshat.
 

fletcher

Darkness always says hello.
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Feb 20, 2006
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#13
No clue what Taylor ham/pork roll is. Is it just lunch meat?
Its like salami in a way, but not as hard or spiced. Typically fried and served with american cheese and egg on a hard roll. Standard diner fare in these parts, and very contested.

Am I so predictable?
As predictable as fenrir.
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
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#14
Its like salami in a way, but not as hard or spiced. Typically fried and served with american cheese and egg on a hard roll. Standard diner fare in these parts, and very contested.
I think I could easily get on board with that but I have a hard time believing it's better than good old ham.


Predictability is a staple of a c plusser.
As predictable as fenrir.
I'm never gonna break through the glass ceiling with you niggas holding me back.
 

fletcher

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Feb 20, 2006
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#15
I think I could easily get on board with that but I have a hard time believing it's better than good old ham.
It is better than you can imagine.

I'm never gonna break through the glass ceiling with you niggas holding me back.
Gotta get that first temp ban so you can be in the cool kids club.
 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
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#16
No clue what Taylor ham/pork roll is. Is it just lunch meat?


Not even cornbread? I'm not from the south but that shit's delicious.



Am I so predictable?
corn bread is delicious. I make a great one in my skillet but I almost never see it out.
 

fletcher

Darkness always says hello.
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Feb 20, 2006
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#17
Pork roll...Taylor a brand..and there are better.
oh and:
even THAT company calls it pork roll...asshat.
Do you order a Caesar salad or a lettuce salad with Caesar dressing? Some things are more known for their brand name then they are for what they actually are.
 

maz

TRueWDTer
Feb 16, 2005
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#20
Grits - I wouldn't seek them out , had them a few times down in Georgia as a kid
Root Beer - Pretty good , especially Hires
Scrapple - Never took a liking to it
Fried green tomatoes - not interested in the least

Not gonna get into the pork roll argument again
 

Sinn Fein

Infidel and White Interloper
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Aug 29, 2002
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#21
Root beer is the only thing on that list that I like.

But I do know that the proper term is pork roll.
 

Psychopath

Plata O Plomo
Dec 28, 2008
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#22
I like root beer, but birch beer is way better.
 

Stormrider666

Hell is home.
Mar 19, 2005
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#23
Love me some root bear. I haven't eaten grits since I was kid, but I do remember them being good eats. Who doesn't love cornbread?

I'm sorry, Scrapple doesn't look very appealing.

I have no idea what the Taylor ham and/or pork roll is.
 

fletcher

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Feb 20, 2006
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#24
Blue area is Taylor ham country, red is pork roll savages. Thats all.

 

Psychopath

Plata O Plomo
Dec 28, 2008
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#25
I'm surprised something like Lebanon Bologna isn't in this list. Seltzer's is about 15 minuets from my parents house.