Feds to outlaw kids working on farms.

Josh_R

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http://dailycaller.com/2012/04/25/r...-dept-rule-banning-farm-chores/#ixzz1t3pgMMxg

Rural kids, parents angry about Labor Dept. rule banning farm chores
Published: 1:31 AM 04/25/2012

By Patrick Richardson
Journalist
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GUTHRIE, TX - OCTOBER 24: Cole Hatfield tends to his show steers on the 6666 Ranch October 24, 2007 in Guthrie, Texas on October 24, 2007. (Photo by Rick Gershon/Getty Images)

A proposal from the Obama administration to prevent children from doing farm chores has drawn plenty of criticism from rural-district members of Congress. But now it’s attracting barbs from farm kids themselves.

The Department of Labor is poised to put the finishing touches on a rule that would apply child-labor laws to children working on family farms, prohibiting them from performing a list of jobs on their own families’ land.

Under the rules, children under 18 could no longer work “in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials.”

“Prohibited places of employment,” a Department press release read, “would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges and livestock auctions.”

The new regulations, first proposed August 31 by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, would also revoke the government’s approval of safety training and certification taught by independent groups like 4-H and FFA, replacing them instead with a 90-hour federal government training course.

Rossie Blinson, a 21-year-old college student from Buis Creek, N.C., told The Daily Caller that the federal government’s plan will do far more harm than good.

“The main concern I have is that it would prevent kids from doing 4-H and FFA projects if they’re not at their parents’ house,” said Blinson.

“I started showing sheep when I was four years old. I started with cattle around 8. It’s been very important. I learned a lot of responsibility being a farm kid.”

In Kansas, Cherokee County Farm Bureau president Jeff Clark was out in the field — literally on a tractor — when TheDC reached him. He said if Solis’s regulations are implemented, farming families’ labor losses from their children will only be part of the problem.

“What would be more of a blow,” he said, “is not teaching our kids the values of working on a farm.”

The Environmental Protection Agency reports that the average age of the American farmer is now over 50.

“Losing that work-ethic — it’s so hard to pick this up later in life,” Clark said. “There’s other ways to learn how to farm, but it’s so hard. You can learn so much more working on the farm when you’re 12, 13, 14 years old.”

John Weber, 19, understands this. The Minneapolis native grew up in suburbia and learned the livestock business working summers on his relatives’ farm.

He’s now a college Agriculture major.

“I started working on my grandparent’s and uncle’s farms for a couple of weeks in the summer when I was 12,” Weber told TheDC. “I started spending full summers there when I was 13.”

“The work ethic is a huge part of it. It gave me a lot of direction and opportunity in my life. If they do this it will prevent a lot of interest in agriculture. It’s harder to get a 16 year-old interested in farming than a 12 year old.”

Weber is also a small businessman. In high school, he said, he took out a loan and bought a few steers to raise for income. “Under these regulations,” he explained, “I wouldn’t be allowed to do that.”
In February the Labor Department seemingly backed away from what many had called an unrealistic reach into farmers’ families, reopening the public comment period on a section of the regulations designed to give parents an exemption for their own children.

But U.S. farmers’ largest trade group is unimpressed.

“American Farm Bureau does not view that as a victory,” said Kristi Boswell, a labor specialist with the American Farm Bureau Federation. “It’s a misconception that they have backed off on the parental exemption.”

Boswell chafed at the government’s rationale for bringing farms strictly into line with child-labor laws.

“They have said the number of injuries are higher for children than in non-ag industries,” she said. But everyone in agriculture, Boswell insisted, “makes sure youth work in tasks that are age-appropriate.”

The safety training requirements strike many in agriculture as particularly strange, given an injury rate among young people that is already falling rapidly.

According to a United States Department of Agriculture study, farm accidents among youth fell nearly 40 percent between 2001 and 2009, to 7.2 injuries per 1,000 farms.

Clark said the regulations are vague and meddlesome.

“It’s so far-reaching,” he exclaimed, “kids would be prohibited from working on anything ‘power take-off’ driven, and anything with a work-height over six feet — which would include the tractor I’m on now.”

The way the regulations are currently written, he added, would prohibit children under 16 from using battery powered screwdrivers, since their motors, like those of a tractor, are defined as “power take-off driven.”

And jobs that could “inflict pain on an animal” would also be off-limits for kids. But “inflicting pain,” Clark explained, is left undefined: If it included something like putting a halter on a steer, 4-H and FFA animal shows would be a thing of the past.

In a letter to The Department of Labor in December, Montana Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg complained that the animal provision would also mean young people couldn’t “see veterinary medicine in practice … including a veterinarian’s own children accompanying him or her to a farm or ranch.”

Boswell told TheDC that the new farming regulations could be finalized as early as August. She claimed farmers could soon find The Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division inspectors on their land, citing them for violations.

“In the last three years that division has grown 30 to 40 percent,” Boswell said. Some Farm Bureau members, she added, have had inspectors on their land checking on conditions for migrant workers, only to be cited for allowing their own children to perform chores that the Labor Department didn’t think were age-appropriate.

It’s something Kansas Republican Senator Jerry Moran believes simply shouldn’t happen.

During a March 14 hearing, Moran blasted Hilda Solis for getting between rural parents and their children.

“The consequences of the things that you put in your regulations lack common sense,” Moran said.

“And in my view, if the federal government can regulate the kind of relationship between parents and their children on their own family’s farm, there is almost nothing off-limits in which we see the federal government intruding in a way of life.”

The Department of Labor did not respond to repeated requests for comment.
She claimed farmers could soon find The Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division inspectors on their land, citing them for violations.
These farmers need to take a stand and start pointing shotguns in the faces of these government inspectors. One of two things will happen: the inspectors will go away and we will have food, or the farmers will go to jail and we will not have food. Which one do you think the government will let happen?
 
Dec 8, 2004
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Well these would effect small privately owned farms... that are slowly disappearing and huge factory farms are replacing them.
 

CousinDave

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I'm sure this is just one of those stupid plans the bureaucrats come up with that they think will reduce unemployment

If the kids aren't working on the farm, that means the farm will have to hire on my help

doing so will just raise prices
 

Creasy Bear

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These farmers need to take a stand and start pointing shotguns in the faces of these government inspectors. One of two things will happen: the inspectors will go away and we will have food, or the farmers will go to jail and we will not have food. Which one do you think the government will let happen?
Yeah! Stick a shotgun in some government drone's stupid face! Shoot the messenger! That'll solve the problem! Good thinkin', Uncle Ted! :icon_roll

On the other hand, maybe we could go with a non-crazy redneck option...

Vote Obama and his bureaucracy-crazed bleeding heart busybody control freak appointees out of office and the fuck out of our lives.
 

Josh_R

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Yeah! Stick a shotgun in some government drone's stupid face! Shoot the messenger! That'll solve the problem! Good thinkin', Uncle Ted! :icon_roll

On the other hand, maybe we could go with a non-crazy redneck option...

Vote Obama and his bureaucracy-crazed bleeding heart busybody control freak appointees out of office and the fuck out of our lives.
I never said shoot anyone. I said threaten to shoot with the intent of scaring the government drone off. Since when has voting anyone out of office actually reduced the number of bureaucrats and led to a massive repeal of rules? The farmers have leverage here. They can participate in civil disobedience by refusing to allow inspectors on their land and then refusing to pay the fines. If they go to jail, then we don't have food and our country goes apeshit and FINALLY realizes that our government is way out of line.
 

MagicBob

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Chores ≠ Employment

a section of the regulations designed to give parents an exemption for their own children
so the law is written with an exemption for your own child working on your own farm?

hyperbolic tripe is hyperbolic
 

Creasy Bear

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I never said shoot anyone. I said threaten to shoot with the intent of scaring the government drone off. Since when has voting anyone out of office actually reduced the number of bureaucrats and led to a massive repeal of rules? The farmers have leverage here. They can participate in civil disobedience by refusing to allow inspectors on their land and then refusing to pay the fines. If they go to jail, then we don't have food and our country goes apeshit and FINALLY realizes that our government is way out of line.
Seriously, Cletus... if you think pulling a gun and threatening to kill a government inspector is a rational and viable form of "civil disobedience", then you really need to roll off of your sister cousin and join us here in civilized, non-tabacky juice spittin' society. Put down your varmint gun, put your smell hound back on its leash, and organize an unarmed, non-crazy ass protest.

Trust me, if you persist in the notion that your shootin' iron can settle your beefs with the governments for you... it's not going to end well. Trust me... it just won't.
 

Party Rooster

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The Department of Labor is poised to put the finishing touches on a rule that would apply child-labor laws to children working on family farms, prohibiting them from performing a list of jobs on their own families’ land.
Liar.

And aren't there already laws against using child labor on farms? I remember one of Walmart's blueberry suppliers getting popped for it a few years ago.

Miley pic in 3...2...1....
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,303
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#11
Seriously, Cletus... if you think pulling a gun and threatening to kill a government inspector is a rational and viable form of "civil disobedience", then you really need to roll off of your sister cousin and join us here in civilized, non-tabacky juice spittin' society. Put down your varmint gun, put your smell hound back on its leash, and organize an unarmed, non-crazy ass protest.

Trust me, if you persist in the notion that your shootin' iron can settle your beefs with the governments for you... it's not going to end well. Trust me... it just won't.
Well that and they are considered Federal Law enforcement...
 

Creasy Bear

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That means shoot first. :action-sm
Look how well it worked out for "The Sausage King"...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_Alexander_(businessman_and_murderer)

Santos Linguisa Factory Murders

When the inspectors finally entered the premises for their daily inspection, an angered but calm-appearing Alexander would then proceed to retrieve one of his guns from his office drawer, re-enter the lobby room, then shoot and kill, in cold blood, the two USDA inspectors and a state inspector. U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors Jean Hillery, 56, and Thomas Quadros, 52, and state Department of Food and Agriculture Inspector William Shaline, 57, were killed. One California State Inspector, Earl Willis, 51, managed to escape into a nearby bank located there on Washington Street as a now fuming Alexander chased after him down the block, which was recorded on camcorder by the proprietor of one of the nearby businesses.[5] After Alexander's failed attempt to shoot Willis, he immediately went back to his linguisa factory lobby and emptied three more shots into the heads of the victims, making sure that they were dead. The police would soon finally arrive upon the scene within a few minutes only after someone in the bank notified the police department; they would arrive to see a waiting Alexander standing in front of his factory, admitting to the murders and ready to be taken into custody.
 

MagicBob

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Dec 2, 2010
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#15
Wonder if the Department of Labor has black helicopters like the FDA...
pfffffftttt.... the GOV. keeps a pool of black helo's spun up at secret bases all over the country. All you have to do is show yer Illuminati/Zionist/Fed. Gov. ID and they just bill your dept. for the flight hours.... that is of course if they arent busy spreading chem trails, sometimes you have to book ahead.
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,303
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Maine
#17
pfffffftttt.... the GOV. keeps a pool of black helo's spun up at secret bases all over the country. All you have to do is show yer Illuminati/Zionist/Fed. Gov. ID and they just bill your dept. for the flight hours.... that is of course if they arent busy spreading chem trails, sometimes you have to book ahead.
Hmmm better scan and Photoshop my pict on to my chicks id... can't right now as she is out putting fluoride in the water again.
 

MagicBob

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Dec 2, 2010
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#18
can't right now as she is out putting fluoride in the water again.
she's part of the massive communist plot that is fluoridation (going old school conspiracy theory)
dont trust her. :action-sm
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,303
21,206
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Maine
#19
she's part of the massive communist plot that is fluoridation (going old school conspiracy theory)
dont trust her. :action-sm
I think she said fluoride but she might be obfuscating and painting bridges with thermite paint again...
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
40,284
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438
The Inland Empire State
#24
Ya eh... on a side note might fuck up my hay supplier that basically has his kids like 12 and over helping him cut etc...
He'll be fine.

WHD News Release: [08/31/2011]
Contact Name: Laura McGinnis or Sonia Melendez
Phone Number: (202) 693-4653 or x4672
Release Number: 11-1250-NAT
US Labor Department proposes updates to child labor regulations

Aims to improve safety of young workers employed in agriculture and related fields

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor is proposing revisions to child labor regulations that will strengthen the safety requirements for young workers employed in agriculture and related fields. The agricultural hazardous occupations orders under the Fair Labor Standards Act that bar young workers from certain tasks have not been updated since they were promulgated in 1970.

The department is proposing updates based on the enforcement experiences of its Wage and Hour Division, recommendations made by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and a commitment to bring parity between the rules for young workers employed in agricultural jobs and the more stringent rules that apply to those employed in nonagricultural workplaces. The proposed regulations would not apply to children working on farms owned by their parents.

"Children employed in agriculture are some of the most vulnerable workers in America," said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. "Ensuring their welfare is a priority of the department, and this proposal is another element of our comprehensive approach."

The proposal would strengthen current child labor regulations prohibiting agricultural work with animals and in pesticide handling, timber operations, manure pits and storage bins. It would prohibit farmworkers under age 16 from participating in the cultivation, harvesting and curing of tobacco. And it would prohibit youth in both agricultural and nonagricultural employment from using electronic, including communication, devices while operating power-driven equipment.

The department also is proposing to create a new nonagricultural hazardous occupations order that would prevent children under 18 from being employed in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials. Prohibited places of employment would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges and livestock auctions.

Additionally, the proposal would prohibit farmworkers under 16 from operating almost all power-driven equipment. A similar prohibition has existed as part of the nonagricultural child labor provisions for more than 50 years. A limited exemption would permit some student learners to operate certain farm implements and tractors, when equipped with proper rollover protection structures and seat belts, under specified conditions.

The Wage and Hour Division employs a combination of enforcement, compliance assistance and collaboration strategies in partnership with states and community-based organizations to protect children working in the United States. When violations of law are found, the division uses all enforcement tools necessary to ensure accountability and deter future violations.

The division is responsible for enforcing the FLSA, which establishes federal child labor provisions for both agricultural and nonagricultural employment, and charges the secretary of labor with prohibiting employment of youth in occupations that she finds and declares to be particularly hazardous for them. The FLSA establishes a minimum age of 18 for hazardous work in nonagricultural employment and 16 in agricultural employment. Once agricultural workers reach age 16, they are no longer subject to the FLSA's child labor provisions. The FLSA also provides a complete exemption for youths employed on farms owned by their parents.

The public is invited to provide comments on this important proposal, which must be received by Nov. 1. A public hearing on the proposal will be held following the comment period. More information, including a complete list of the proposed revisions, will be available in the Federal Register on Sept. 2.

http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/whd/WHD20111250.htm