'Gentle Giant' Dies After NYPD Cop Puts Him In Chokehold

Hmmm... how about some decorum... nope..

Eric Garner’s dad allegedly assaulted at granddaughter’s funeral



Gwen Carr, mother of Eric Garner, is forcibly removed from the funeral of Erica Garner during an altercation.

Eric Garner’s father is claiming a relative conked him in the head with a plastic soda bottle during his granddaughter’s funeral, police sources said Wednesday.

Ben Carr, 68, whose son was killed by police in 2014, sparking national protests, told cops Tuesday night the relative assaulted him during Monday’s funeral for Erica Garner, Eric Garner’s daughter, the sources said.

Carr told cops his granddaughter, 30-year-old Shadinee Snipes, was the person behind the bottle attack, although her motive is still unclear.

The grandpa was treated at Richmond County Medical Center after the encounter, sources said.

Gwen Carr, Eric Garner’s mom, has also filed a complaint against the same woman after Snipes allegedly grabbed Gwen by the coat and threw her to the ground, cops said.

Erica Garner, who became an activist for social justice after her father’s death, died on Dec. 30 in Brooklyn after suffering a massive heart attack.
Link

Oh and:

https://www.generosity.com/fundraisers/fund-for-the-children-of-eric-garner

What the payout from the city wasn't enough?
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator

Bobobie

Registered User
Mom and Dad are Carr so why is his Surname Garner? Is he actually the Step-Father?
 

Opie&JimmyShow

Well-Known Member
Donator
Don't forget how much the mother/ex wife got from the city... if anything she should have been charged with murder due to her feeding him shit for however long he was dumping loads into her.
Lemme tell you something, all those women Garner had kids with were only one thing to him, cum dumpsters. All of his children are just by-products of what didn't run down their legs. The fact that any of them got a dime from the city and no one rioted shows how the civilized person gets shived in the shitter over and over again so self-serving pols can get their pictures and names in the papers.
 
4 Years this has been going on! 4 years...


Report: DOJ divided over filing civil rights charges against Eric Garner cop

Updated 5:21 PM; Posted 2:31 PM

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Federal prosecutors have recently recommended that civil rights charges be brought against the officer involved in Eric Garner's death, but other Department of Justice (DOJ) officials are hesitant about proceeding with the case, according to a New York Times report.

Garner, 43, died in police custody on July 17, 2014 in Tompkinsville. Officer Daniel Pantaleo is seen in a video with his arm around Garner's neck while wrestling him to the ground across from Tompkinsville Park.

Garner repeatedly screamed "I can't breathe" on the video.

Prosecutors tried getting approval from Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to seek an indictment, the report said. The Times reported Rosenstein held several meetings within the DOJ, but they could not agree whether to move forward.

No decision has been made, but a source told the Times it appeared unlikely Pantaleo would be charged.

Pantaleo's attorney, Stuart London, could not immediately be reached Friday.

"If the Trump administration's Justice Department doesn't hold NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaelo and others who killed my son accountable by prosecution and conviction, then they are failing to uphold law-and-order for the sake of politics," said Garner's mother, Gwen Carr, in a statement.

Last June, members of the Garner family and Rev. Al Sharpton met with DOJ officials in Brooklyn about the status of the case.

Officials informed them that they are taking the case seriously, but did not give the family a sense of why it was taking so long or when the investigation will conclude, Sharpton told the media during a press conference after the meeting.

The family was hoping to get news of an indictment, but were left disappointed.

"DOJ officials told me and my family last summer that there would be a final decision by the end of 2017 - it's outrageous that now they're reporting that they're still deciding through the media without reaching out to me at all," Carr said. "This isn't news, they're playing political games with the murder of my son."

Two years ago, the DOJ in Washington, D.C. took over the investigation after Brooklyn federal prosecutors and FBI agents nixed the idea of pursuing federal charges against Pantaleo and other members of the force who were involved in the incident.

The DOJ had reportedly wanted to have charges brought against one or more of the officers.

In 2014, a Staten Island grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo for his role in Garner's death during his arrest for selling loose, untaxed cigarettes.

"It's been nearly four years and there still is no justice - it's unacceptable," Carr said. "It's beyond time for Pantaleo and other officers to be prosecuted by DOJ, and Mayor de Blasio and the NYPD also need to stop playing politics by hiding behind the Trump administration, and fire Pantaleo and all officers responsible for murdering Eric and related misconduct."

De Blasio said the family has waited long enough for a decision on this case.

"After almost four years of deliberation, and with the NYPD long ready to proceed with its disciplinary process, we once again urge the Department of Justice to show some level of decency to the Garner family and make its decision," the mayor said in a statement.
 
4 Years this has been going on! 4 years...


Report: DOJ divided over filing civil rights charges against Eric Garner cop

Updated 5:21 PM; Posted 2:31 PM

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Federal prosecutors have recently recommended that civil rights charges be brought against the officer involved in Eric Garner's death, but other Department of Justice (DOJ) officials are hesitant about proceeding with the case, according to a New York Times report.

Garner, 43, died in police custody on July 17, 2014 in Tompkinsville. Officer Daniel Pantaleo is seen in a video with his arm around Garner's neck while wrestling him to the ground across from Tompkinsville Park.

Garner repeatedly screamed "I can't breathe" on the video.

Prosecutors tried getting approval from Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to seek an indictment, the report said. The Times reported Rosenstein held several meetings within the DOJ, but they could not agree whether to move forward.

No decision has been made, but a source told the Times it appeared unlikely Pantaleo would be charged.

Pantaleo's attorney, Stuart London, could not immediately be reached Friday.

"If the Trump administration's Justice Department doesn't hold NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaelo and others who killed my son accountable by prosecution and conviction, then they are failing to uphold law-and-order for the sake of politics," said Garner's mother, Gwen Carr, in a statement.

Last June, members of the Garner family and Rev. Al Sharpton met with DOJ officials in Brooklyn about the status of the case.

Officials informed them that they are taking the case seriously, but did not give the family a sense of why it was taking so long or when the investigation will conclude, Sharpton told the media during a press conference after the meeting.

The family was hoping to get news of an indictment, but were left disappointed.

"DOJ officials told me and my family last summer that there would be a final decision by the end of 2017 - it's outrageous that now they're reporting that they're still deciding through the media without reaching out to me at all," Carr said. "This isn't news, they're playing political games with the murder of my son."

Two years ago, the DOJ in Washington, D.C. took over the investigation after Brooklyn federal prosecutors and FBI agents nixed the idea of pursuing federal charges against Pantaleo and other members of the force who were involved in the incident.

The DOJ had reportedly wanted to have charges brought against one or more of the officers.

In 2014, a Staten Island grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo for his role in Garner's death during his arrest for selling loose, untaxed cigarettes.

"It's been nearly four years and there still is no justice - it's unacceptable," Carr said. "It's beyond time for Pantaleo and other officers to be prosecuted by DOJ, and Mayor de Blasio and the NYPD also need to stop playing politics by hiding behind the Trump administration, and fire Pantaleo and all officers responsible for murdering Eric and related misconduct."

De Blasio said the family has waited long enough for a decision on this case.

"After almost four years of deliberation, and with the NYPD long ready to proceed with its disciplinary process, we once again urge the Department of Justice to show some level of decency to the Garner family and make its decision," the mayor said in a statement.
Oh for fucks sake a fucking career criminal with gravy for blood resisted arrest... and snuffed it. The end.



Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 
I suggest we Cannonize him St. Eric of Loosie and be done with it...

To Honor Eric Garner’s a Career Criminal's Life, Reform de PoPo

Like so many other black men in the United States, Eric Garner has been denied justice even in death.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is considering, but is expected to reject, federal civil rights charges against Daniel Pantaleo, the police officer whose use of a chokehold on Mr. Garner led to his death on a Staten Island street in 2014. (Pssst Gravitus and resisting arrest caused his death)

A state grand jury declined to indict Officer Pantaleo on homicide charges in 2014. Obama Justice Department officials sat on the case for nearly a year, as civil rights prosecutors in Washington feuded with federal prosecutors in New York who didn’t think the evidence was strong enough. The Justice Department asked the city to delay police disciplinary proceedings while it was considering the matter. The case landed on Mr. Rosenstein’s desk in recent weeks when civil rights prosecutors recommended bringing charges over the objections of the prosecutors in New York.

Hope for any justice probably lies in Mayor Bill de Blasio and his police commissioner, James O’Neill, doing what should have been done years ago: firing Officer Pantaleo.

But the bigger question is why, given his record, Officer Pantaleo was on the street the day he wrapped his arm around Mr. Garner’s throat, and why New York police officers so often avoid real discipline for wrongdoing.

By the time Officer Pantaleo approached Mr. Garner outside a Staten Island beauty supply store because he thought he was selling untaxed loose cigarettes, the city’s independent Civilian Complaint Review Board had substantiated four allegations of abuse against him in two incidents since he joined the department in 2006, according to leaked disciplinary records published by ThinkProgress last year.

That record should have served as a red flag. As of May 1, just 8 percent of the city’s 36,000 police officers had ever had a single complaint against them substantiated by the review board. Just 550 officers — 2 percent of the force — had had two substantiated complaints. Officer Pantaleo was disciplined just once, lightly. After an abusive frisk in 2012, the Police Department docked him two days of vacation pay.

The Garner case is an example of a larger problem: Like his predecessors, Mr. de Blasio, who was elected promising to make policing fairer for black and Latino New Yorkers, has not done enough to hold the police accountable for misconduct and abuse.

There are signs of progress. Complaints against officers are down since Mr. de Blasio took office. So are police stops, though they had already begun a steep decline in 2013 under former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, after a federal judge struck down the city’s aggressive use of the tactic known as stop and frisk as unconstitutional. (but stops crime... go figure)

But in many ways the mayor — stung in his first term when hundreds of police officers turned their backs on him at the funerals of two officers murdered because of the uniform they wore — has resisted attempts at reform.
l
Mr. de Blasio opposed legislation increasing oversight of police stops, eventually backing a more limited version amid the threat that City Council members would override his veto. He threatened to veto legislation that would have made the use of a chokehold by a police officer a crime.

Many of the racial disparities under Mr. Bloomberg that Mr. de Blasio rightfully denounced have persisted. Arrests for marijuana possession are down to about 17,000 a year, half of what they were under Mr. Bloomberg. But city data shows blacks and Latinos continue to make up an overwhelming majority of those arrested. Police Department officials have said their enforcement mirrors complaints, but they have yet to provide compelling data to back up the claim. Facing political pressure, Mr. de Blasio said on Tuesday that the police would overhaul their marijuana enforcement policy within 30 days.

A report from the Civilian Complaint Review Board in December found that the police commissioner was increasingly rejecting the board’s disciplinary recommendations. Police officials say many of the complaints substantiated by the board are for minor infractions.

The public will just have to take their word for that, since the city no longer discloses disciplinary records of police officers, citing a state civil rights law that the mayor and Commissioner O’Neill say that they oppose but that can be changed only by the State Legislature. Republican control of the Senate makes that unlikely.

In the almost four years since Mr. Garner’s death, black men and boys who have died unjustly at the hands of the police — Walter Scott in South Carolina (yep that cop executed that dude), Philando Castile (psst don't reach for a gun when told not to) in Minnesota, Tamir Rice (don't remove the organge tip from a airsoft and then point it at sheet) in Cleveland — have been memorialized, honoring the humanity that has been lost. But more needs to be done.

The officer who used a chokehold (for a split second) on Mr. Garner should be fired. But the mayor needs to make it clear that New York City will hold the rest of its 36,000 police officers accountable and will work to make that discipline public if they abuse their powers and violate the public trust.
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Go fuck yourself... you are honoring a career criminal who runs around dumping loads in women... well not anymore thankfully.
 
Just go away, idiot resisted arrest and should eaten more vegetables instead of HoHo's

Eric Garner's Gravy Blood's A career criminal's mother confronts Mayor de Blasio about NYPD accountability for her son's death

Gwen Carr confronted Mayor de Blasio with a stark question Wednesday about the police officers involved in the death of her son, Eric Garner.

“Would you agree to holding all of these officers accountable for their wrongdoing that day?” she asked. “I do not want to play anymore political procrastination.”

The NYPD has finally begun disciplinary proceedings against the officer, Daniel Pantaleo, who placed the unarmed Garner in a chokehold as he cried “I can’t breathe,” some four years after his death. Disciplinary charges are also being brought against Sgt. Kizzy Adonis who was on scene. It comes after years of de

Blasio insisting the department would first wait for the U.S. Justice Department to decide whether to bring civil rights charges – a decision the feds have yet to make, prompting de Blasio this summer to say he would stop waiting.

Carr put the mayor on the spot at a town hall he held at Curtis High School on Staten Island, less than a mile from where Garner died.




This image shows cops arresting Eric "I should have taken the stairs instead of the elevator" Garner, who died as a police officer used a chokehold. (Obtained by NY Daily News)

“It’s been four years since my son’s murder and it’s been very hard on me and my family but the cash helps, but it seems like the administration is blocking the accountability for the, you know, for the justice for my son and this just makes the four years worse for me,” she said.

Carr asked whether the city would discipline all of the officers on the scene for failing to help her son as he screamed for help. She noted that Pantaleo has recently received a hefty raise, arguing he’d managed to profit off her son’s death.

“This is not a game. It’s not politics with me and my family. This is serious,” she said. “My son Eric Garner’s life mattered.”

De Blasio acknowledged his answer probably wouldn’t be what Carr was looking for.

“I don’t think what I’m going to say is going to satisfy you, but I want to just tell you straight up, I have a lot of respect for you,” he said.

De Blasio said there would be a public NYPD disciplinary trial.

“It will be those two officers – that is the decision that came out of a previous review of the situation and I know you disagree with that, but I want to be straightforward,” she said.

He argued that the NYPD had made strides in training officers on issues like implicit bias and de-escalating conflict.

“We can create a more humane and compassionate relationship between our communities and our police, and I wish from the bottom of my heart that your son were still here, and I’m so sorry he is not,” de Blasio said.

“But in terms of the changes that have happened since his death, he did not die in vain,” he continued. “A lot of change has happened, and a lot of people’s lives will be the better for it.”
Link

Hey, how about not commiting a crime and then resisting arrest.... hmmmmm?
 

jnoble

Lingering longer for a longering linger
Translation: I needs mo' gibs cause the first round is running out
 
5 fucking years and it is still not over...

No federal charges for NYPD officer in Eric Garner's Gravey for Blood's death

The Justice Department is not bringing federal charges against a New York Police Department officer accused of fatally choking carrer criminal Eric Garner, the New York man whose last words, "I can't breathe," became a rallying cry in the Black Lives Matter movement.

Federal authorities had a deadline of Wednesday -- five years since Garner's death -- to decide whether to bring charges against NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo. The officer appeared, in a cell phone video, to have Garner in a chokehold shortly before he died. Pantaleo denies that he used a chokehold.

The city medical examiner's office ruled the death a homicide in the days after his death, and the medical examiner testified that Pantaleo's alleged chokehold caused an asthma attack and was "part of the lethal cascade of events."

But US Attorney Richard P. Donoghue said there was insufficient evidence to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Pantaleo acted "willfully" in violation of the federal criminal civil rights act.


"There is nothing in the video to suggest that Officer Pantaleo intended or attempted to place Mr. Garner in a chokehold," Donoghue said.

A still from a cell phone video of Eric Garner's death.

Attorney General William Barr made the decision not to bring charges against Pantaleo, siding with a Justice Department team from New York over the Civil Rights Division in Washington, due to concerns that prosecutors could not successfully prove the officer acted willfully, a senior Justice Department official said.
Members of Garner's family, the Rev. Al Sharpton and several others met with federal prosecutors on Tuesday to learn of the decision.

"They came in that room and they gave condolences," said Emerald Garner, his daughter. "I don't want no condolences. I want my father and my sister."

Garner's mother, Gwen Carr, said the Department of Justice had failed them. But dayum I's loves my new hoopty yo!

"Five years ago, my son said 'I can't breathe' 11 times, and today we can't breathe, because they let us down," she said. But dat cash sho help...

Eric Garner's mother Gwen Carr wiped away tears after speaking to reporters outside the US Attorney's office on Tuesday.
The decision means that Pantaleo will not face any criminal charges related to Garner's death, though he does still face departmental charges. Federal investigators have been examining the circumstances of Garner's death since 2014, after a grand jury in New York declined to indict the Staten Island officer. The city of New York settled with Garner's estate for $5.9 million in 2015.

Rallying cry sparks a movement

Garner's death, three weeks before the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, started the resurgence of police accountability and brought the Black Lives Matter movement to the forefront, Sharpton said.

"Five years ago, Eric Garner was choked to death. Today, the federal government choked Lady Justice," Sharpton said.
The "I can't breathe" phrase reflected the suffocating frustration with what activists said was a lack of police accountability after police killings of African Americans. The phrase was widely heard and seen at protests, and NBA stars like LeBron James bore the message on T-shirts in support of the cause.



LeBron James wears an "I Can't Breathe" shirt during warmups before his game against the Brooklyn Nets at the Barclays Center on December 8, 2014, in New York.

Meanwhile, the NYPD has brought departmental charges against Pantaleo. If found guilty of using the chokehold and restricting Garner's breathing, he could face discipline ranging from loss of vacation days to the loss of his job.

And while Pantaleo's career hangs in the balance, a mother's grief remains, with each emotional scab reopened at every departmental hearing, anniversary and rally.

"Some days are my good days. Some days are my dark days," said Carr, who became an activist soon after her son's death and has remained a fixture at police reform rallies. "Some days I can hardly move around because I'm in deep thought."
With his career on the line, NYPD police officer accused of fatally choking Eric Garner declines to testify

Carr spent Monday afternoon looking through photos from Garner on his wedding day. It's how she likes to remember him.

"Sometimes it's unbearable," Carr said. "I feel like it's my duty and my obligation. I do this for my son."

Garner died on July 17, 2014, after police attempted to arrest the 43-year-old father of six, who was allegedly selling loose cigarettes illegally on Staten Island, a crime he had been arrested for previously.

Garner's friend, Ramsey Orta, recorded the confrontation on his cell phone as it quickly escalated.
In the video, Pantaleo can be seen wrapping one arm around Garner's shoulder and the other around his neck before jerking him back and pulling him to the ground.

As Pantaleo forces Garner's head into the sidewalk, Garner can be heard saying "I can't breathe. I can't breathe."
The phrase became the rallying cry of the Black Lives Matter movement. Marchers yelled the phrase as they took to the streets in New York in protest of Garner's death.

Departmental charges focus on alleged chokehold
Five years later, whether or not Pantaleo applied a chokehold remains the crux of the case. Activists and lawyers for the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the city agency charged with overseeing the NYPD, call it an illegal chokehold, which is banned by the department. But union officials and lawyers for Daniel Pantaleo call it a "seatbelt hold" a take down maneuver that is taught to rookies while at the academy.

They blame Garner's death on his poor health. "Mr. Garner died from being morbidly obese" and having other health issues, Pantaleo's attorney, Stuart London, said earlier this year. "He was a ticking time bomb and set these facts in motion by resisting arrest."

London says his client is different from other officers he's represented in his almost 22 years defending cops. The other officers were aggressive, young police officers, he said.

"(Pantaleo) has been characterized as an overly aggressive officer with a history of this sort of behavior, and nothing can be further from the truth," London said. "This was a regular patrolman doing regular police work."
Police shootings: Trials, convictions are rare for officers

London says key facts of the case have been lost in the politics: that Pantaleo was ordered to arrest Eric Garner, for example. London also claims that the physical injuries that Garner sustained do not show evidence of a chokehold -- though the CCRB says they do.

London has defended Pantaleo during his disciplinary proceeding, which has been prosecuted by the CCRB. Rosemarie Maldonado, the department's deputy commissioner for trials, oversaw the proceeding.



It included testimony from the city medical examiner, who ruled the death a homicide; Pantaleo's former instructor at the police academy, who said he did not teach the officer the seatbelt maneuver; and a medical examiner from St. Louis, who reviewed the autopsy and said the alleged chokehold was part of a chain of events that killed the father of six. But not him resisting arrest nah had nothing at all to do with anything... ho-lee-fuckadoddles.

Now that the hearing is over, if Pantaleo is found guilty of using a banned chokehold, Maldonado can recommend he be terminated. Commissioner James O'Neill, who has final say in the matter, then would determine whether Pantaleo could keep his job.

Meanwhile, Garner's mother said that the loss of Pantaleo's job wouldn't fix anything, but it would at least be something. Carr did not want to acknowledge the possibility that the time limit to federally charge Pantaleo with a crime could expire without any charges.

"It doesn't do a lot. It's just that we must have some type of accountability. Some type of responsibility. Where the police officers are held accountable and pay for their misconduct," she said. "If we just sit aside on the sidelines and let it go, it's going to keep on happening."
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"They came in that room and they gave condolences," said Emerald Garner, his daughter. "I don't want no condolences. I want my father and my sister." - Hang on you are blaming the death of that fat cunt on the PoPo as well... go fuck yourself
 
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