Getting tired of work - again

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,922
8,997
763
Loveland, CO
#1
I know this will probably come across as an entitled rant/whine, but it has happened before and I don't know what the hell is wrong with me.

As some of you know, I work in construction as an engineer, my primary duties are overseeing the work in the field and making sure everything goes smoothly. Over the last 10 years I've gotten into a groove where I get on a project (most last 3-4) years, hit the ground running, then get mired down in bullshit and feel like I need a change of scenery. I've quit 2 companies and gone to work for competitors because of this funk in the last 7 years, always after working for 3-4. Typically these moves are purely selfish, with no real promise of great advancement, just a new address to move to. Work has always been the same. I believe my career has taken a hit because of it, and could've advanced much farther if I stuck it out with the original companies.

I'm feeling that way again. I've been in California now for about 3 years and have been working on my current project for 2+. I really feel like it's time for a change of scenery. Problem is, that my current role is more or less a facilitator and a second set of eyes and ears for my company on this project. I've asked for more responsibility because I am in a rut and was told basically NO, to focus on this job and protect our company's interests. It was that response that basically set the wheels in motion for me again that it's time to move on. This company has treated me well, given me an excellent position and the salary is great, but I feel like, as destructive as it sounds career-wise, that it's time to seek a new adventure. What can I do to shake that feeling and tell myself that the best thing is to stick it out and hopefully a new opportunity will present itself within the company soon?
 
Jun 2, 2005
15,516
4
0
Dallas
#2
I know exactly what you're talking about. I've suffered from it my entire life as well, though my cycle usually runs closer to 18 months - 2 years. One thing I found that helped was to always keep my options open, and interview for new stuff whenever possible. It would always give me the temporary relief of something new being possible, and who knows? One of the bullshit interviews might turn out to be something amazing.

If you're a rated PE you should just farm your resume to head-hunters. If you're not a PE, you should be. When I worked in recruiting I saw some fucking incredible gigs for PE rated guys with 10+ years related experience. I'm talking $300k+ car, bonus, expense account, and access to corporate assets like company jets, etc. Obviously, most of the jobs in that category are sales and contract acquisition (generally filled by recently retiring municipal engineers who were basically used to grease the wheels for lucrative contracts), but they are out there.

Or you could always start your own business. Worked for me.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,922
8,997
763
Loveland, CO
#3
I'm not a PE, I've considered getting it (and California, which is the top PE to get, seems to be handing them out like candy) but I've never taken the time from my schedule to pursue it. For the type of work I do, it's not really applicable, it would be more of a status thing. But maybe that's something that would help me get refocused, kind of a new outlet to redirect my energy. Something to think about.
 
Jun 2, 2005
15,516
4
0
Dallas
#8
Oh wow, no PE huh? Do you even have your EIT? I mean, I know how it goes, I've got many, many engineer friends who're in spots where it wouldn't help them at all. (A few of them are working on Sig Sigma Green and Black Belts and never even bothered with EIT. Weird to me)

But yeah, getting your PE would definitely at least give you some short term goals to focus on while stuffing that resume and giving you a nice little suffix for your name.

I gotta wonder if this isn't related, though:

http://www.wackbag.com/showthread.php/137082-Happy-Birthday-MayrMeninoCrash-!!!!!

;)
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,922
8,997
763
Loveland, CO
#9
I've got the EIT. Took it (and passed) before I graduated college. Two of the reasons I never pursued the PE, 1) Because I've never really worked on the design side - Always been a Contractor - Up until recently, I would've had to take the test in either Geotechnical, Structural, Traffic or Environmental. Now they offer a Civil PE in Construction which covers all the topics I've been involved in the past 15 years. 2) I've always heard that you had to work UNDER a P.E. to get a P.E. and, without finagling my resume quite a bit, most of the people I've worked for have not been registered. I believe this requirement is somewhat relaxed now.

The biggest obstacle going to be remembering stuff from 15 years ago. I will have to invest in some good books and study guides, especially for the seismic stuff on the CA exam.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
43,673
10,135
848
#10
eh i love my job i like were i work i like my customers, its just dealing with my mentally ill boss, but i am convinced that its not just him but me also for putting up with it this long
 

Bigtchrist

Registered User
Mar 1, 2007
303
3
233
Nothern Cal
#11
I work for the local goverment... i hate my job.. i hate all the bullshit politics involved... i hate being bitched out for showing up 2 minutes late once in a while after being here almost 10 years... when im able im going to be quitting and taking my cal pers with me and getting a new job....
 

Turfmower

Registered User
Jan 17, 2005
3,994
489
578
Jersey
#12
You could always quit your job put on a little black face and go this route.

[YT]HRVBFaLjOWU[/YT]
 

Larz

****Self-Banned****
It's My Birthday!
Feb 12, 2006
2,678
2
228
NYC E. Village, No Homo
#13
2) I've always heard that you had to work UNDER a P.E. to get a P.E. and, without finagling my resume quite a bit, most of the people I've worked for have not been registered. I believe this requirement is somewhat relaxed now.

The biggest obstacle going to be remembering stuff from 15 years ago. I will have to invest in some good books and study guides, especially for the seismic stuff on the CA exam.
the Work experience requirement is the biggest pain in the ass when it comes to sitting for principles and practice... in New York the minimum is 4 years. If you graduated from an ABET/EAC accredited program (even if this was a long time ago) then the amount of experience you have under your belt should be more than enough. The scrutiny is much higher when you try to fulfill the 12 credit test requirement with minimal experience.

I would say go for it but take a prep course. Its an 8 hour exam and thats not so easy to study (or train) for on your own. I remember having to register at least six months in the advance of the test date so in between that time you might as well take a couple of refresher classes. The upside is that its open book. You really want to make it a one and done thing since its only given twice a year.