Google Lobbying Nevada Lawmakers for Cars of the Futcha!

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
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#1
Can't imagine this getting any traction when you factor in the potential lawsuits...

Google to Nevada: Let Our Cars Drive Themselves

Google's self-driving cars may soon hit the road in Nevada if a pair of bills get through the state legislature.

The bills would make Nevada the first state to legalize self-driving cars on public roads, the New York Times reports. One bill would amend electric vehicle laws to allow registration and licensing of autonomous automobiles. The other is an exemption to the state's ban on texting while driving, allowing cell phone use from the driver's seat while the car drives itself.

Google, which revealed last year that it's been testing self-driving cars, is quietly lobbying for the bills, which are likely to get a vote before the legislative session ends in June. Last month, Google lobbyist David Goldwater argued to Nevada lawmakers that self-driving cars are safer and more fuel-efficient, while promoting economic development. It's not clear why the search giant has targeted Nevada, but my guess is that Google likes the state's vast stretches of open road and its proximity to California, where Google is based.

Although self-driving cars aren't yet street legal in the United States, Google already took the liberty of testing its six-car fleet in California, with a backup driver behind the wheel and another Google employee monitoring the system in the passenger seat.

The cars use roof-mounted video cameras, radar and a laser range finder to detect surrounding traffic, and they've covered 140,000 miles without incident, except for one case where Google's car got bumped from behind. Google claims that self-driving cars could cut automobile accidents in half.

Even if Nevada lawmakers approve of both bills, don't expect to safely fall asleep at the wheel anytime soon. A Google spokesman told the Times that the project is still very much in its testing phases.

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http://techland.time.com/2011/05/11/google-to-nevada-let-our-cars-drive-themselves/#ixzz1QLGe3Cva
 

Turfmower

Registered User
Jan 17, 2005
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#4
they make the Chinese test it out It cant be worst then they drive
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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#7
Volkswagon has a prototype driver assist system similar to what google is working on. It'll pilot the car between the lanes and slow down and speed up depending on traffic as well as obey speed limits. Pretty decent idea for long range commutes.
 

OilyJillFart

Well-Lubed Member
Sep 26, 2008
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#8
As the OP alluded to, none of these concepts will make it to market in this legal climate. People sue all the time over cruise control malfunctions, multiply that by a lot.
No software vendor is going to accept that kind of responsibility.
 

JonBenetRamsey

well shit the bed
Aug 30, 2005
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#10
some failed discovery show about prototypes tested a car like this. it actually performed well and it's only crash was during a very tight turn but it hit the sidewall at 5 mph? it was pretty cool to see that it could be possible to perfect it.
 

Hate & Discontent

Yo, homie. Is that my briefcase?
Aug 22, 2005
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#12
I remember hearing about something similar years ago, using magnets in a special stretch of highway in California. The magnets showed the car where it was in the lane, and sensors in the bumpers allowed it to detect other cars. The special stretch of road was only open to the rigged cars, though, so they werent having to deal with regular traffic.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
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#13
I remember hearing about something similar years ago, using magnets in a special stretch of highway in California. The magnets showed the car where it was in the lane, and sensors in the bumpers allowed it to detect other cars. The special stretch of road was only open to the rigged cars, though, so they werent having to deal with regular traffic.
That technology is used on the 80 through the Sierras (Truckee area) for Caltrans to keep their plows centered on the lanes when they have huge snowdrifts and zero visibility to plow through.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
41,804
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#14
friggen google had me in the middle of a park yesterday when i was in the middle of the delaware bay, im not impressed
 

Falldog

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May 16, 2007
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#15
friggen google had me in the middle of a park yesterday when i was in the middle of the delaware bay, im not impressed
Just be grateful, ten years ago teleportation technology existed only in sci-fi stories.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
Mar 14, 2005
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#17
The modern implementation uses video analysis to determine where the asphalt and the lane markers are.

Of course I can see this collapsing if you left a roadway and went into an old shitty parking lot or in an improperly labeled work zone where they've diverted traffic.
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
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#18
The modern implementation uses video analysis to determine where the asphalt and the lane markers are.

Of course I can see this collapsing if you left a roadway and went into an old shitty parking lot or in an improperly labeled work zone where they've diverted traffic.
I don't think it's meant to replace that, more like a cruise control "on steroids". In the video, they show how if you grab the wheel it disengages the auto-pilot feature, similar to tapping on the brakes on cruise control.