Grandma Says She Didn't Know Seeds Were Pot

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
40,304
7,454
438
The Inland Empire State
#1
She Didn't Know They Were Marijuana Seeds

Alberta Kelley Says They Came From Stranger In Connellsville

POSTED: 11:45 am EST January 5, 2012
UPDATED: 6:28 pm EST January 5, 2012

CONNELLSVILLE, Pa. -- Alberta Kelley tried to tell police that she was just out for a walk when a bearded stranger wearing a toboggan hat gave her some seeds, and she had no idea that they would grow marijuana plants.

The 67-year-old Connellsville grandmother was charged anyway with possession and manufacture of a controlled substance, but a Fayette County jury found her not guilty this week.

"He said they was flower seeds. Some guy just gave them to me, and I just planted them," Kelley told Channel 4 Action News reporter Ashlie Hardway. "Around here, I don't know any of the neighbors."

Kelley told Hardway that when she got home with the seeds that the man had given her, she tossed them in her garden on South Cottage Avenue and didn't think anything of it -- until the police showed up months later.

"I was waiting to see what kind of flowers they grew, because flowers are pretty. We grow some in the front and some over there," Kelley said. "I never saw marijuana plants grow in my entire life, and I never been around marijuana, so I wouldn't know the difference. To me, weeds are weeds."

Police Chief James Capitos said the charges were filed in January 2011, after they got an anonymous tip and saw seven 4-foot-tall plants of suspected marijuana growing near the tomatoes in Kelley's back yard.

"They had been very, very well-cultivated. They weren't small," Capitos said. "They weren't huge like cornstalks, but they were fairly nice marijuana plants."

The plants were sent to a state police crime lab and positively identified as marijuana, according to the complaint.

"I said I took them and threw them like that and let them grow their selves. I didn't know what they were. I still don't know what they were," Kelley said.

"In a situation like that, we don't have much of a choice but to file the charges," Capitos said. "You don't decide whether or not you're going to charge somebody based on their age or what they look like. You're going to file based on whether or not you have probable cause to make the arrest."

Kelley, who has no criminal record, said she's glad the case is over. The identity of the man who gave her the seeds remains unknown.
"I learned not to trust anybody ever again," she said.
Video at the link. I know it sounds crazy, but I'm kinda buying her story after watching her...
http://www.wtae.com/news/30141636/detail.html#ixzz1iib67qrs
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
22,543
13,852
608
Idaho
#4
45 years ago she was 22 years old, and it was 1967. That filthy hippy chick knew good and well what she had planted.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
578
Akron, Ohio
#5
Hopefully the feds will lock this terrible law-breaker away for a good long time so that she can reflect on all the lives she has ruined...
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,635
49,876
644
#6
Johnny Stonerseed must have a strong head.
 

CougarHunter

Lying causes cat piss smell.
Mar 2, 2006
10,590
2,570
566
KC Metro
#7
Typical cop line, "You can't use an ounce of judgement or common sense, a life-ruining arrest is warranted in all circumstances."
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
54,162
12,930
373
Atlanta, GA
#8
"I was waiting to see what kind of flowers they grew, because flowers are pretty. We grow some in the front and some over there," Kelley said. "I never saw marijuana plants grow in my entire life, and I never been around marijuana, so I wouldn't know the difference. To me, weeds are weeds."

Police Chief James Capitos said the charges were filed in January 2011, after they got an anonymous tip and saw seven 4-foot-tall plants of suspected marijuana growing near the tomatoes in Kelley's back yard.

"They had been very, very well-cultivated. They weren't small," Capitos said. "They weren't huge like cornstalks, but they were fairly nice marijuana plants."
Bullshit. If she really thought the pot plants were just weeds, she would've gotten rid of them the second she recognized them as weeds. Instead, she cultivated them until they were 4 feet tall.