Guess whose officially less popular than Republicans, Democrats, Muslims and Atheists

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,436
8,604
693
Silverdale, WA
#1


Crashing the Tea Party
By DAVID E. CAMPBELL and ROBERT D. PUTNAM

GIVEN how much sway the Tea Party has among Republicans in Congress and those seeking the Republican presidential nomination, one might think the Tea Party is redefining mainstream American politics.

But in fact the Tea Party is increasingly swimming against the tide of public opinion: among most Americans, even before the furor over the debt limit, its brand was becoming toxic. To embrace the Tea Party carries great political risk for Republicans, but perhaps not for the reason you might think.

Polls show that disapproval of the Tea Party is climbing. In April 2010, a New York Times/CBS News survey found that 18 percent of Americans had an unfavorable opinion of it, 21 percent had a favorable opinion and 46 percent had not heard enough. Now, 14 months later, Tea Party supporters have slipped to 20 percent, while their opponents have more than doubled, to 40 percent.

Of course, politicians of all stripes are not faring well among the public these days. But in data we have recently collected, the Tea Party ranks lower than any of the 23 other groups we asked about — lower than both Republicans and Democrats. It is even less popular than much maligned groups like “atheists” and “Muslims.” Interestingly, one group that approaches it in unpopularity is the Christian Right.

The strange thing is that over the last five years, Americans have moved in an economically conservative direction: they are more likely to favor smaller government, to oppose redistribution of income and to favor private charities over government to aid the poor. While none of these opinions are held by a majority of Americans, the trends would seem to favor the Tea Party. So why are its negatives so high? To find out, we need to examine what kinds of people actually support it.

Beginning in 2006 we interviewed a representative sample of 3,000 Americans as part of our continuing research into national political attitudes, and we returned to interview many of the same people again this summer. As a result, we can look at what people told us, long before there was a Tea Party, to predict who would become a Tea Party supporter five years later. We can also account for multiple influences simultaneously — isolating the impact of one factor while holding others constant.

Our analysis casts doubt on the Tea Party’s “origin story.” Early on, Tea Partiers were often described as nonpartisan political neophytes. Actually, the Tea Party’s supporters today were highly partisan Republicans long before the Tea Party was born, and were more likely than others to have contacted government officials. In fact, past Republican affiliation is the single strongest predictor of Tea Party support today.

What’s more, contrary to some accounts, the Tea Party is not a creature of the Great Recession. Many Americans have suffered in the last four years, but they are no more likely than anyone else to support the Tea Party. And while the public image of the Tea Party focuses on a desire to shrink government, concern over big government is hardly the only or even the most important predictor of Tea Party support among voters.

So what do Tea Partiers have in common? They are overwhelmingly white, but even compared to other white Republicans, they had a low regard for immigrants and blacks long before Barack Obama was president, and they still do.

More important, they were disproportionately social conservatives in 2006 — opposing abortion, for example — and still are today. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter today was a desire, back in 2006, to see religion play a prominent role in politics. And Tea Partiers continue to hold these views: they seek “deeply religious” elected officials, approve of religious leaders’ engaging in politics and want religion brought into political debates. The Tea Party’s generals may say their overriding concern is a smaller government, but not their rank and file, who are more concerned about putting God in government.

This inclination among the Tea Party faithful to mix religion and politics explains their support for Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas. Their appeal to Tea Partiers lies less in what they say about the budget or taxes, and more in their overt use of religious language and imagery, including Mrs. Bachmann’s lengthy prayers at campaign stops and Mr. Perry’s prayer rally in Houston.

Yet it is precisely this infusion of religion into politics that most Americans increasingly oppose. While over the last five years Americans have become slightly more conservative economically, they have swung even further in opposition to mingling religion and politics. It thus makes sense that the Tea Party ranks alongside the Christian Right in unpopularity.

On everything but the size of government, Tea Party supporters are increasingly out of step with most Americans, even many Republicans. Indeed, at the opposite end of the ideological spectrum, today’s Tea Party parallels the anti-Vietnam War movement which rallied behind George S. McGovern in 1972. The McGovernite activists brought energy, but also stridency, to the Democratic Party — repelling moderate voters and damaging the Democratic brand for a generation. By embracing the Tea Party, Republicans risk repeating history.
Color me shocked! (not really)

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/17/opinion/crashing-the-tea-party.htm
 

Begbie

Wackbag Generalissimo
Jul 21, 2003
17,918
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Wilmington, NC
#3
I scrolled down without reading it and picked one sentence that you put in bold to see if it's even worth reading...I picked this one:

They are overwhelmingly white, but even compared to other white Republicans, they had a low regard for immigrants and blacks long before Barack Obama was president, and they still do.
And I shant be reading it further because this sentence is patently false. Just another bullshit article from a bullshit paper.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,643
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#5
Jews!
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
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Akron, Ohio
#7
That's weird, because it seems like Congress (which is composed of Republicans and Democrats) has been running less than 20% approval ratings for a while now. This is better than the Tea Party how? Who would have guessed that a New York Times/ CBS News survey would come up against the "Tea Party"? It's really strange that they didn't include a link to the actual poll results or any of the questions that were asked. Wonder why?
Congressional Job Approval
Polling Data
Poll Date Approve Disapprove Spread
RCP Average 6/9 - 8/14 16.0 78.2 -62.2
Gallup 8/11 -8/14 13 84 -71
FOX News 8/7 - 8/9 10 81 -71
CNN/Opinion Research 8/1 - 8/1 14 84 -70
CBS News/NY Times 6/24 - 6/28 20 70 -50
Associated Press/GfK 6/16 - 6/20 21 76 -55
NBC News/Wall St. Jrnl 6/9 - 6/13 18 74 -56
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/other/congressional_job_approval-903.html
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,436
8,604
693
Silverdale, WA
#8
That's weird, because it seems like Congress (which is composed of Republicans and Democrats) has been running less than 20% approval ratings for a while now. This is better than the Tea Party how? Who would have guessed that a New York Times/ CBS News survey would come up against the "Tea Party"? It's really strange that they didn't include a link to the actual poll results or any of the questions that were asked. Wonder why?

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/other/congressional_job_approval-903.html
The Tea Party questions are here

And as far as the "popularity of Congress" question, I think that's a separate question. People are favorable to "Republicans" versus are people favorable towards "Republicans in Congress".
 
Dec 4, 2010
3,596
2
0
Glassboro, NJ
#9
I want to know why you would highlight a statement in the article who's only possible purpose is to make any non agenda driven person question its credibility.
 

CousinDave

Registered User
Dec 11, 2007
25,297
198
393
Ohio
#10
Something tells me this poll are commissioned to get these results

I'm guessing the first of several loaded questions read like this

Since the "Tea Party" is more dangerous than muslims, how do you rate the Tea Party compared to muslims
 
Dec 4, 2010
3,596
2
0
Glassboro, NJ
#11
Can someone please explain to me why wanting the govt to practice the same sort of fiscal responsibility than an proper household does evil again?

And while I'm in bizarro world why is S&P being treated like evil criminals for dropping our credit rating. Any person who is maxing out their credit cards paying on their other credit cards and then having to keep uping the limits on the cards to keep going would have a shitty credit rating. If anything we should have a lower credit rating. We can barely pay our bills!!!!
 

Owenay

Those who fail to learn from history are doomed...
May 10, 2007
3,666
248
358
Bizarro World
#12
I scrolled down without reading it and picked one sentence that you put in bold to see if it's even worth reading...I picked this one:

And I shant be reading it further because this sentence is patently false. Just another bullshit article from a bullshit paper.




http://www.gallup.com/poll/127181/Tea-Partiers-Fairly-Mainstream-Demographics.aspx#1


It's really strange that they didn't include a link to the actual poll results or any of the questions that were asked. Wonder why?
Or any of the sampling data... Maybe they've learned that's it's best to just omit that info after the recent CNN/CBS poll was proven to be HEAVILY slanted (and STILL managed to prove many of their claims to be false, despite selectively reporting on it).

Bottom line is I don't doubt that there are a significant number of people in this country with an unfavorable opinion of the TEA party. After all, you can't turn on the TV or pick up a paper or peruse the internet without being bombarded with accusations of 'crazy', 'fringe', 'extreme', 'racist', 'homophobe', 'Islamophobe', 'terrorist', or some other derogatory accusation being levied at them. Who wants to side with those things? Most people are not all that engaged in politics or even all that well-read for that matter. So they believe the word of those whom they've spent their entire lives trusting.

What I find the most interesting is that a majority of Americans do support the majority of the positions and beliefs that the TEA party people hold (which I proved the post I made about the flawed and misreported CNN/CBS poll). Just don't tell them that's a TEA party position and everything's golden. I've been saying this since the healthcare debates and I'll say it again: Those who are a part of the conservative ascendency in America should consider retiring the 'TEA party' moniker altogether. It's cheesy, somewhat childish, and above all, has been affectively bludgeoned into negativity by the mainstream media and Hollywood.

All that being said, with everything that's gone on since 2008, I find it ludicrous to assert that Americans are siding against the TEA party and are instead saying:

1. Government should spend more money they don't have
2. Washington thinks first about the citizens and not about their own careers
3. Americans should be taxed more
4. There aren't enough regulations on business in America
5. We should bail-out more corporations
etc...

Sounds more like wishful thinking to me... Or perhaps it's that well-known Progressive/Alinskyite tactic of repeating falsehoods incessantly until they are inevitably accepted as fact by the un-engaged masses...
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
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Akron, Ohio
#13
Well, thanks for posting the link.
Very interesting results.
31. Is your opinion of the Tea Party movement favorable, not favorable, undecided, or
haven't you heard enough about the Tea Party movement yet to have an opinion?
Favorable Not fav. Undecided Haven't heard enough Refused
20 _________ 40______ 18__________ 21_______________ 2
Looks like more people chose not to answer the question than had an unfavorable opinion. When a newspaper says that some group has a 20% favorable rating, the average person assumes that they also have an 80% disapproval rating, not that most people didn't even answer the question. Political Spin FAIL.

Then there's this:
32. Do you think the Tea Party movement has too much influence, too little influence, or
the right amount of influence in the Republican Party?
Too much Too little Right amount DK/NA
43 _________17_______ 24_________ 16
41% think the Tea Party are doing just right or NOT ENOUGH within the Republican Party. Hmm, that's strange that they only have a 20% approval rating but 17% think they need to do more.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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Jan 12, 2010
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#15
Well, thanks for posting the link.
Very interesting results.

Looks like more people chose not to answer the question than had an unfavorable opinion. When a newspaper says that some group has a 20% favorable rating, the average person assumes that they also have an 80% disapproval rating, not that most people didn't even answer the question. Political Spin FAIL.

Then there's this:

41% think the Tea Party are doing just right or NOT ENOUGH within the Republican Party. Hmm, that's strange that they only have a 20% approval rating but 17% think they need to do more.
Jesus that is pretty bad. Polls are fucking worthless.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
578
Akron, Ohio
#16
Jesus that is pretty bad. Polls are fucking worthless.
Polls aren't worthless, twisting the results to fit your ideology is. They were 100% right to say that the Tea Party only has a 20% approval rating. The same newspaper would have also been 100% right to say that the Tea Party only has a 40% unfavorable rating, and leave it up to their audience to assume they have a 60% approval rating.
I did a whole paper on the "Cancer Alley" in Louisiana where they claim that chemical plants have led to a 25% (or whatever %, I forget) higher rate of cancer than the rest of America. Turns out that if you read the real numbers, the region has some of the highest smoking rates, and the lowest rates of health insurance, as well as the highest poverty rates. Hmm, maybe all the poor people who smoke like chimneys and don't go to the doctor has more to do with the high cancer rates than the evil chemical plants.
 

mascan42

Registered User
Aug 26, 2002
18,844
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#20
Well, thanks for posting the link.
Very interesting results.

31. Is your opinion of the Tea Party movement favorable, not favorable, undecided, or
haven't you heard enough about the Tea Party movement yet to have an opinion?
Favorable Not fav. Undecided Haven't heard enough Refused
20 _________ 40______ 18__________ 21_______________ 2
Looks like more people chose not to answer the question than had an unfavorable opinion. When a newspaper says that some group has a 20% favorable rating, the average person assumes that they also have an 80% disapproval rating, not that most people didn't even answer the question. Political Spin FAIL.
I think you read that wrong. Here it is laid out in an easy-to-read fashion:

Favorable: 20
Not favoarble: 40
Undecided: 18
Haven't heard enough: 21
Refused to answer: 2

Only 2% didn't answer the question. But considering that "haven't heard enough" and "undecided" are essentially the same thing, that's 39% who haven't made up their minds - statistically the same amount as those with a negative opinion. That shows a huge amount of confusion about what the TP is all about. I think that comes down to the lack of a coherent and consistent message. The only thing all Tea Partiers can agree on is they want Obama gone.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Jan 12, 2010
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#21
I think you read that wrong. Here it is laid out in an easy-to-read fashion:

Favorable: 20
Not favoarble: 40
Undecided: 18
Haven't heard enough: 21
Refused to answer: 2

Only 2% didn't answer the question. But considering that "haven't heard enough" and "undecided" are essentially the same thing, that's 39% who haven't made up their minds - statistically the same amount as those with a negative opinion. That shows a huge amount of confusion about what the TP is all about. I think that comes down to the lack of a coherent and consistent message. The only thing all Tea Partiers can agree on is they want Obama gone.
He was pointing out the inference in the article. As he explained, by stating only 20% support the TP, people would assume 80% don't. The article should have stated that 20% support it, 40% don't, and the remaining 60% have no opinion/don't know enough/refuse to answer.

By the way confusion regarding the TP is the media's goal. Their overwhelming cause is fiscal responsibility. Getting Obama out is simply a means to accomplish that.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
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Akron, Ohio
#23
He was pointing out the inference in the article. As he explained, by stating only 20% support the TP, people would assume 80% don't. The article should have stated that 20% support it, 40% don't, and the remaining 60% have no opinion/don't know enough/refuse to answer.

By the way confusion regarding the TP is the media's goal. Their overwhelming cause is fiscal responsibility. Getting Obama out is simply a means to accomplish that.
Thank you.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
578
Akron, Ohio
#24
I think you read that wrong. Here it is laid out in an easy-to-read fashion:
Only 2% didn't answer the question. But considering that "haven't heard enough" and "undecided" are essentially the same thing, that's 39% who haven't made up their minds - statistically the same amount as those with a negative opinion.
And thank you for completely restating my post after saying I got it wrong.:action-sm