Help cure cancer/high five with your unused CPU cycles PART II (Folding@home)

#1
I don't know if any of you are familiar with folding@home. It is a program you can download that works in the background to help research cures for cancer, aids, etc. I saw that there was no wackbag team so I started one - it's team #46604. If anyone wants to participate goto http://folding.stanford.edu/ you can find all the info there.

Mod edit: this is like SETI@Home, but for a good cause. Get involved!
Mod Edit (11/30/06): The original thread is here. Trimmed down this one to help bring in new folders
 

HummerTuesdays

Another girrrrl!!!
#3
I'm so not a techie. Can someone put this into layman's terms? And yes, I did read their web site, too. I think I get it, but I'm not sure.
 

zagman76

Wackbagger, Geek, Administrator
Wackbag Staff
#4
Basically, the program uses your computer's CPU (which you can set to run when you are not using the computer) to simulate various biological functions (protien folding in this case). The resulting data is used by the scientists in their research.
 

HummerTuesdays

Another girrrrl!!!
#5
Does this increase my vulnerability to viruses, spyware, and such?
 

zagman76

Wackbagger, Geek, Administrator
Wackbag Staff
#6
HummerTuesdays said:
Does this increase my vulnerability to viruses, spyware, and such?
It shouldn't - the @home projects conly connect to the net to send/receive the results & workload, and they typically connect to university research servers/mainframes. As long as you have a firewall and an anti-virus program, you should be ok.
 
#7
you can also adjust how much cpu you want the program to use when it is available. also, if you are a gamer, I would recommend temporarily exiting while playing as there is a small bug that makes your screen minimize while playing certain games.

zagman76 said:
Rank(within team) User Score WU
1 reyalsnik 157 1
2 Jonkeu 95 1
3 zagman76 0 6


I don't understand how I have 6 WU's complete, but 0 points... :huh: ... oh well..
Here's a Faq from the site about the points system. wierd though that u have no points. :icon_conf

Folding@Home points FAQ



Introduction. Much of what drives distributed computing is the sense of collegiate competition to compute the most for the project as possible. One way to quantitatively assess this is through the points that FAH keeps track of (in our statistics or "stats" pages). Here, we detail the nature of how our points are determined and why that method is used. There are lots of methods one could use, but we've found that over time (and with extensive discussions with Folding@Home donors) that our current method is a reasonable compromise, given all the complexity of awarding points for Folding@Home work units.

How do you decide how much credit a work unit is worth? Points are determined by the performance of a given machine relative to a becnhmark machine. Before putting out any new work unit, we benchmark it on a dedicated 2.8GHz Pentium 4 machine with SSE2 disabled (more specifically, as reported by /proc/cpuinfo on linux: vendor_id : GenuineIntel, cpu family : 15, model : 2, model name : Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz, stepping : 9, cpu MHz : 2806.438, cache size : 512 KB). This machine runs linux, so all WUs are benchmarked with the linux core.

We plug the results of this into the following formula:

points = 110 * (daysPerWU)

where daysPerWU is the number of days it took to complete the unit. This equation was chosen to match the points for previous Gromacs WUs to the previous point system. The upshot is that Tinker WUs will be worth more than before we set up the new points (i.e. before April 2004).

Please note that the very concept of a reference machine will mean that some WU benchmarking will vary from the performance on your machine. Even between P4s, there are significant differences in architectures over the years. Moreover, variations between FAH WUs can also lead to differences in benchmarking points.

Our goal is consistency within a given definition of a reference machine setup (described above), but beyond that the natural variation from machine to machine and WU to WU will never allow any point system to perfectly reflect what you get on your machine.



Why are some projects given significantly more points than others? Certain projects require substantially more donor computer resources than others, either in terms of more disk space, more network transfer, or more RAM used. By default, these work units are given out to clients which opt in to request them. To reward those donors for donating resources beyond the typical client, we currently give bonus points for these larger work units.



How big are bonus points? Currently the bonus points are a 50% increase over the standard benchmark point determination (described above). Please note that this value is subject to change.



How do I configure my client to get bonus point WUs? Please see our configuration FAQ for these details.



Is there any risk of taking on bonus point work units? These work units are larger and more experimental: for example, they often involve new cores, such as the QMD core. Thus, they are more experimental. Thus, one should not run big work unit clients on non-dedicated machines. The bonus points are a reward for giving more resources to FAH and so one should not be surprised that these work units are very intrusive and take the complete resources of the machine.



Why can't AMD machines get QMD WUs, which have large points? Please check out the FAQ on the QMD core. We describe in great detail the situation regarding AMD chips and the QMD core. This situation is present only in QMD WUs, which represents a very small part of FAH.
 
M

Mike Bizzle

Guest
#8
I'm in too, but for some reason it won't do anything. It keeps saying "Couldn't get work instructions." Anyone know how to fix this. As for my settings, I am using IE settings
 
#11
Something I found out today.. I you have a hyperthreading p4, folding@home only sees 1/2 the processor and will only use 50% at most. You have to run two instances to get max cpu.
 
#12
Feedback said:
Something I found out today.. I you have a hyperthreading p4, folding@home only sees 1/2 the processor and will only use 50% at most. You have to run two instances to get max cpu.
yes, but you can't run 2 instances of the gui version; it will only work if you run the console version on the other half of your cpu.
 
#13
patbattlefield said:
yes, but you can't run 2 instances of the gui version; it will only work if you run the console version on the other half of your cpu.
Yep... fuck the gui, it burns cpu just trying to draw the screen
 

zagman76

Wackbagger, Geek, Administrator
Wackbag Staff
#14
I have a HT p4, and only 1 instance of the CLI app running, and it is using 100% of the CPU...
 

BigWilly

Just thoughts, no prayers.
#16
Alright, I'm up and folding away now. This CPU usage is dedicated to my uncle John Pearson, 2003, lymphoma. He would have loved O&A.
 

AgentSmith

I fear that I've somehow been infected by it.
#17
BigWilly said:
Alright, I'm up and folding away now. This CPU usage is dedicated to my uncle John Pearson, 2003, lymphoma. He would have loved O&A.
Here's to Uncle John!!!!!!!!!!!!Cheers!
 
#18
NORTONnFRIENDS said:
I must be a water head because im still confused.
This is from the folding@home hompage. Hope it helps:

What are proteins and why do they "fold"?

Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, Huntington's, Parkinson's disease, and many cancers and cancer-related syndromes.

What does Folding@Home do?

Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. We use novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct our approach to examine folding related disease.



How can you help?

You can help our project by downloading and running our client software. Our algorithms are designed such that for every computer that joins the project, we get a commensurate increase in simulation speed.

One can also help by donating funds to the project, via Stanford University.

What have we done so far? We have had several successes. You can read about them on our Science page, Results section, or go directly to our press and papers page.

NORTONnFRIENDS said:
So what this does is use many computers to compute findings to speed up the process of testing medical ideas?
yes, earlier in this thread i posted an interview with the head of the folding program and he explained that by using distributed computing they are able to leap 15 years ahead of the present technology available in supercomputers.

For those of you who think this will hurt your PC here is an answer I found in a folding forum that should aleve your worries:


Myth: Running a CPU at 100% for weeks on end will "wear it out". (submitted by HTPC Rookie"
Truth: Explain to him that an electrical interface cannot wear out, it can only become damaged by extreme voltages, heat, or physical causes. I had a P3700MHz folding for 24/7, and it's still folding. Many people here have even older machines that still run. I think i'm near the top of the "I have an old crappy computer lying around" from the Mac "Lisa" in my garage that STILL RUNS. The only thing F@H can theoretically shorten is a drive lifespan, but considering how often the windows indexing service crawls the drive, if you disable that rarely-used feature, F@H will have no negative effect. (submitted by Shadowchild)
 

AgentSmith

I fear that I've somehow been infected by it.
#19
Can I run both the screen saver and console version at the same time? What happens if I run two console versions at the same time? ONLY if you install in different directories. Also, DO NOT just copy the files from one directory to each other. This will cause our server to get confused, and 1) you won't get credit for the work you do, and 2) it will be no use for science. Instead, run the install program twice into each directory. If you have already copied the program into multiple directories and are trying to run it, find the client.cfg file and delete the "userid=xxxxxxxx" line. Next time it connects to F@H, it should reset the client.cfg file, and all should be well.
 
T

timp64

Guest
#20
AgentSmith said:
I knew you had AMD in there! I'm running an AMD64 X2 4400+ on one machine and an AMD64 3200+ on the other.

The X2 is sooooooo much faster than the 3200+ it's scary.

When are you upgrading?

There is a way you can run two applications on your x2 and take advantage of your dual core processor.

How do I set up a multi-processor/HT machine?
**You will need to use the text console client**

- Install the first client as described above except that you need to add the “-local” flag to your shortcut.
- Make a second folder “FAH2” for example. Install the second instance just like the first but enter “2”
for the machine ID.

If you want to run two instances as a service, use the GUI service installer and simply enter 2 for the number of clients. The installer will set everything up for you.

I found that here

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=96729
 

wheezy

Three right turns make a left.
#23
AgentSmith said:
Homeboy's got 11 computers hooked up!!!!!!!!!! What's the Story Wheezy?
1. Way too many spare machines (and a couple are really fast ones)
2. Way too much time on my hands
3. Way too competitive to let you guys show me up.

I have everything from a 550MHz IBM 300PL (a dog) to a quad 3.06 GHz Xeon running this stuff. There's no chance of any pipes freezing in THIS basement.

I have almost 2,300 points racked up today. That should help the team move up a couple of notches. :icon_wink
 
#24
wheezy said:
1. Way too many spare machines (and a couple are really fast ones)
2. Way too much time on my hands
3. Way too competitive to let you guys show me up.

I have everything from a 550MHz IBM 300PL (a dog) to a quad 3.06 GHz Xeon running this stuff. There's no chance of any pipes freezing in THIS basement.

I have almost 2,300 points racked up today. That should help the team move up a couple of notches. :icon_wink

we need more guys like you on the team. thanks for the help.
 

wheezy

Three right turns make a left.
#25
A new milestone for me

I just broke the barrier for 2,000 average points per day. Check it out:
http://folding.extremeoverclocking.com/team_summary.php?s=&t=46604

I think I still might have one more machine to fire up. I only have one more port left on my 8-port KVM switch, so that will be it for me.

This sure beats running a space heater in my basement to keep the pipes from freezing. As soon as the weather gets warmer, I am going to have to back off. The cost of running the A/C to counteract this amount of heat would kill me.

- wheezy
 
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