Hey look at all that oil

Aug 11, 2005
27,637
4
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#1
This is a rather lengthy post... If you like, you can verify it's veracity here, before you take the time to read it, and I do sincerely urge you to read it, maybe twice!

Again, this is astonishing, important and verifiable information :

About 6 months ago, the writer was watching a news program on oil and one of the Forbes Bros. was the guest. The host said to Forbes, "I am going to ask you a direct question and I would like a direct answer; how much oil does the U.S. Have in the ground?" Forbes did not miss a beat, he said, "more than all the Middle East put together." Please read below.

The U. S. Geological Service issued a report in April 2008 that only scientists and oil men knew was coming, but man was it big. It was a revised report (hadn't been updated since 1995) on how much oil was in this area of the western 2/3 of North Dakota, western South Dakota and extreme eastern Montana ..... Check THIS out:

The Bakken is the largest domestic oil discovery since Alaska's Prudhoe Bay and has the potential to eliminate all American dependence on foreign oil. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates it at 503 billion barrels. Even if just 10% of the oil is recoverable... At $107 a barrel, we're looking at a resource base worth more than $5...3 trillion.

"When I first briefed legislators on this, you could practically see their jaws hit the floor. They had no idea.." says Terry Johnson, the Montana Legislature's financial analyst.

"This sizable find is now the highest-producing onshore oil field found in the past 56 years," reportsThe Pittsburgh Post Gazette. It's a formation known as the Williston Basin, but is more commonly referred to as the 'Bakken'. It stretches from Northern Montana , through North Dakota and into Canada. For years, U. S. Oil exploration has been considered a dead end. Even the 'Big Oil' companies gave up searching for major oil wells decades ago. However, a recent technological breakthrough has opened up the Bakken's massive reserves..... And we now have access of up to 500 billion barrels. And because this is light, sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL!

That's enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years straight. And if THAT didn't throw you on the floor, then this next one should - because it's from 2006!

U.S. Oil Discovery- Largest Reserve in the World

Stansberry Report Online - 4/20/2006

Hidden 1,000 feet beneath the surface of the Rocky Mountains lies the largest untapped oil reserve in the world.. It is more than 2 TRILLION barrels. On August 8, 2005 President Bush mandated its extraction. In three and a half years of high oil prices none has been extracted. With this motherload of oil why are we still fighting over off-shore drilling?

They reported this stunning news: We have more oil inside our borders, than all the other proven reserves on earth... Here are the official estimates:

- 8-times as much oil as Saudi Arabia
- 18-times as much oil as Iraq
- 21-times as much oil as Kuwait - 22 times as much oil as Iran
- 500-times as much oil as Yemen
- and it's all right here in the Western United States .

HOW CAN THIS BE? HOW can we NOT BE extracting this?

Because the environmentalists and others have blocked all efforts to help America become independent of foreign oil! Again, we are letting a small group of people dictate our lives and our economy.....WHY?

James Bartis, lead researcher with the study says we've got more oil in this very compact area than the entire Middle East - more than 2 TRILLION barrels untapped. That's more than all the proven oil reserves of crude oil in the world today, reports The Denver Post. Don't think 'OPEC' will drop its price - even with this find? Think again! It's all about the competitive marketplace, - it has to. Think OPEC just might be funding the environmentalists?


http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
15,776
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#4
You know the old saying: Oil oil everywhere so let's all have a drink.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
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#7
Just because there's oil in the ground, doesn't mean it will ever be economically feasible to get it out. The Middle East oil can be extracted for mere pennies compared to what most North American sources can be pumped for. I believe the Alberta Tar Sands don't break even until oil hits $75/bbl. Put another way, there is zero oil in this formation if it costs $10,000/bbl to extract, because no one is stupid enough to put the venture capital behind it to extract it and sell it.
 

Begbie

Wackbag Generalissimo
Jul 21, 2003
18,072
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#11
Maybe if George Soros and the progressives didn't have so much riding on Brazilian oil...we'd be able to explore and drill our own oil. :icon_cool

This thread does need some Voss's Tumor....and maybe a little Magicbob just to tickle our fancy.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
24,666
8,837
693
Loveland, CO
#12
Maybe if George Soros and the progressives didn't have so much riding on Brazilian oil...we'd be able to explore and drill our own oil. :icon_cool .
You're free to boycott oil usage at any time. That will show both the ragheads and the crafty liberals that you don't agree with their policies.

I heard George Soros also likes to breathe oxygen.....maybe that's another boycott you could consider :icon_cool
 

thekidslepthere

Registered User
May 19, 2004
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#15
North Dakota does have a 3.5% unemployment rate.

There's a documentary called Boomtown that aired on Planet Green as a series all about the Brakken the effects of it on this small town. Definitely worth checking out.

I have heard about the shale under Colorado and I think Utah. Not sure the cost of getting it out of the ground. I even think it's on federal land. I think Cain was talking about letting companies drill for it with a certain tax that goes straight to our national debt, I swear I heard some reporter talk about this.
 

Hate & Discontent

Yo, homie. Is that my briefcase?
Aug 22, 2005
15,794
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693
#16
North Dakota does have a 3.5% unemployment rate.

There's a documentary called Boomtown that aired on Planet Green as a series all about the Brakken the effects of it on this small town. Definitely worth checking out.

I have heard about the shale under Colorado and I think Utah. Not sure the cost of getting it out of the ground. I even think it's on federal land. I think Cain was talking about letting companies drill for it with a certain tax that goes straight to our national debt, I swear I heard some reporter talk about this.
Sounds like we need Ellis Wyatt to show up.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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#17
I've been considered moving to ND for a while now. You have to work your ass off but I have a couple friends who are making insane money and really have nowhere to spend it, so it's just building up. The contractor I still work with once in a while up in Oregon calls me every so often to see if I'm interested in going. I'm going to finish school and see what the job market looks like, but I'm definitely open to the idea. I'm still pissed I passed on a job in Alaska in 2005 that would have allowed me to buy a house with cash by now.
 
Jun 2, 2005
15,516
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Dallas
#18
Just because there's oil in the ground, doesn't mean it will ever be economically feasible to get it out. The Middle East oil can be extracted for mere pennies compared to what most North American sources can be pumped for. I believe the Alberta Tar Sands don't break even until oil hits $75/bbl. Put another way, there is zero oil in this formation if it costs $10,000/bbl to extract, because no one is stupid enough to put the venture capital behind it to extract it and sell it.
While this is true, technology and methodology are advancing and bringing extraction costs down. It's a very difficult thing to generalize, as formations vary greatly, but generally speaking everything from that article is at least close enough to true that it's not worth arguing with.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
43,031
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#19
I've been considered moving to ND for a while now. You have to work your ass off but I have a couple friends who are making insane money and really have nowhere to spend it, so it's just building up. The contractor I still work with once in a while up in Oregon calls me every so often to see if I'm interested in going. I'm going to finish school and see what the job market looks like, but I'm definitely open to the idea. I'm still pissed I passed on a job in Alaska in 2005 that would have allowed me to buy a house with cash by now.
i watched a thing the other night about how guys are setting up tent city's in the parking lot of the wallmart
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
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#21
I'm headed over there, I start on November 7th.
Let us know how it goes. I know a guy that has been there all summer and is doing great driving a water truck.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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#22
i watched a thing the other night about how guys are setting up tent city's in the parking lot of the wallmart
Yeah I'm not too excited about whatever living situation I'd be getting myself into. I've spend a lot of time over the last eight years living out in the mountains in tents and cabins for work, but I'm kinda tired of it. However if I don't find a job after graduating pretty quickly, I'd probably go.

The chick situation over there was probably bad enough being ND, now with thousands of more guys I'm sure it's terrible.

I'm headed over there, I start on November 7th.
Definitely keep up informed. I was gonna say you have balls for going right before winter, but then saw you lived in Northern Idaho.
 

Joker1919

Registered User
Oct 11, 2008
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#23
Yeah I'm not too excited about whatever living situation I'd be getting myself into. I've spend a lot of time over the last eight years living out in the mountains in tents and cabins for work, but I'm kinda tired of it. However if I don't find a job after graduating pretty quickly, I'd probably go.

The chick situation over there was probably bad enough being ND, now with thousands of more guys I'm sure it's terrible.



Definitely keep up informed. I was gonna say you have balls for going right before winter, but then saw you lived in Northern Idaho.
I know this living situation there is shitty right now. I do know 2 guys that work for companies that service the oil fields out there and I think both of them live in Wyoming. The thing about that is they make money from the time they leave the house till the time they get back home. I don't think that it is written in stone that you have to live in ND. I'm sure there is a bunch of companies that contract out jobs. I'm looking into going up there myself after school.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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Jan 12, 2010
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#24
I know this living situation there is shitty right now. I do know 2 guys that work for companies that service the oil fields out there and I think both of them live in Wyoming. The thing about that is they make money from the time they leave the house till the time they get back home. I don't think that it is written in stone that you have to live in ND. I'm sure there is a bunch of companies that contract out jobs. I'm looking into going up there myself after school.
I'm pretty close to making the jump, but it's a big gamble on my part. I live in California so just to give it a try requires a substantial investment (fuel there and back alone is like $1,000)... not to mention I have some work and family around California and Oregon right now, but once I get over there I don't know anyone any closer than Idaho to fall back on (and the person I know in Idaho I haven't talked to in over a year).
 

TravisRB69

Registered User
Mar 6, 2006
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#25
The chick situation over there was probably bad enough being ND, now with thousands of more guys I'm sure it's terrible. .
Boy you ain't kiddin! As far as the Bakken goes, I'm thinking we definitely have enough to just say "Middle East WHO?" and cut them out of the equation and rely on oil here for quite some time. The problem here isn't finding a job, it's FINDING A PLACE TO LIVE. Basically the boom in my area is resulting in people moving in faster than new housing/hotels can be built. They've built all kinds of man-camps outside of some of the towns. You can't go into the Wal-Mart and expect to get help, or get checked out, in any kind of a timely manner. You can't go to a gas station without probably having to wait in line, and if your vehicle is broken down, you might as well rent a car - it's going to be at least 3 weeks before the local dealership can get it in. Unless, of course, your vehicle is a white or tan Chevy or Ford pickup with an oil company logo slapped on the side. THEN they can get you in right away!

If you work somewhere outside of the oil industry (I worked retail before I went in the oilfield a year ago), it's frustrating because the customers are there. It's FINDING HELP that's a problem. The local McDonald's has to close completely, or be drive through only some nights, because they can't find help. The retail store I work at struggles very hard because there is a lot more to do than there are people to do it. The frustration in that department is the biggest part of me quitting there.

I'm not putting down the oil boom here, it's done a lot of good things and I'm making more money than I've ever made. The bottom line is, there is TONS of oil up here and it is NOT going away any time soon, unless some retarded politician shuts the rigs down like they did a while back (2004?2005ish? give or take?). If the oilfield is your interest, you will have no problem finding a job. As a side effect, even if the oilfield is not what you want to do, you will have no problem finding a job outside the oilfield either, but it will generally pay a lot less. You just need to have a lot of patience starting out because there's a pretty good chance you'll be living out of a man-camp, a camper, or a hotel for a long time before you find a place of your own.