High Voltage Wiring Help Needed

Shootr

OOHHH, GNARLY!!!
Donator
#1
At work we sent in a press for repair (see tag):

It went in with a L14-30R male 4 conductor plug on it. The male version of the white one in the picture:

It came back with a plug #10-30P 3 conductor on it, so now it won't fit our extension cord.

We're trying to get it rectified with the repair shop, but time is getting short and I need this thing for next week.

All I know is what I researched online, as far as plug numbers and specs.

Can anyone share advice on how I can swap out the 3-prong end on the machine for the 4-prong end? Or just make a short adapter with the appropriate male/female ends.

I'm assuming both have a L1 and L2 hot wire(s), but if there are only 3 wires coming out of the equipment, do I consider the third wire a neutral or a ground?

Thanks.


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Shootr

OOHHH, GNARLY!!!
Donator
#2
This is the wiring diagram I'm using for reference


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HandPanzer

Shantih Shantih Shantih
#3
Asking wackbag for help with wiring high voltage electronics. What could go wrong?
 

Shootr

OOHHH, GNARLY!!!
Donator
#4
I'm not doing the wiring, I'm giving this off to the indian to do it. Duh...

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gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
#5
Is it plugged in?
 

maz

TRueWDTer
#7
220 , 221 , whatever it takes
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#10
Looks to me like you can just tie the grounds together, but you might want to ask an electrician
 
#11
Neutral and ground are connected together at panel. Guess it depend on what supply shops around you have available as far as making a temp jumper.

Pretty sure in most cases you could get away with reversing red and black but there is some equipment that should stay with the appropriate color code for the two hots.



 

maz

TRueWDTer
#12
Think Tom C is some sort of an electrician

But , he did burn his house down

And , find a different motor shop
Tyrone's Motor Fixin' Joint doesn't sound too reliable
 

mud

Registered User
#13
On a 3 wire the neutral and ground are tied together inside the unit. 4 wire they are seperate. Ultimately they go back to the same place in the main panel.

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mud

Registered User
#14
On dryers you just pull out a jumper when installing a 4 wire cord/ plug. Should be the same deal I would think. Probably best bet is just replace the cord. The separating ground and neutral is a safety thing and that's why it has changed per code. Seems like the smarter way to go in a work situation.

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Shootr

OOHHH, GNARLY!!!
Donator
#15
It's the control box for a conveyor belt fusion splicer press. Ancient. The company that bought ours promised us a new one 2 years ago, we're still waiting. It's in Earls hands now. Hope he survives. Thanks @mud and @gorram
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#16
It's the control box for a conveyor belt fusion splicer press. Ancient. The company that bought ours promised us a new one 2 years ago, we're still waiting. It's in Earls hands now. Hope he survives. Thanks @mud and @gorram

 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
#17
Neutral and ground are connected together at panel. Guess it depend on what supply shops around you have available as far as making a temp jumper.

Pretty sure in most cases you could get away with reversing red and black but there is some equipment that should stay with the appropriate color code for the two hots.



@JoeyDVDZ

You should paint your hogchopper red and rename it Hot Red, because that's way cooler than Simply Blue.
 

JoeyDVDZ

Well-Known Member
Donator
#18
@JoeyDVDZ

You should paint your hogchopper red and rename it Hot Red, because that's way cooler than Simply Blue.
No. That sounds gayer than your man bun.

Although "Simply Blue" does sound suspiciously like a gay 80's Flock of Seagulls type band.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
#20
I'm having an electrical problem that may be simple, but since the gurus are here already, I'll tag on rather than making a new thread.

I have a stairway with a switch at both ends. If the top switch is on, the bottom switch will turn it off, but if the bottom switch is off, the top switch won't turn it on. Is this a wiring issue or is it because the bottom switch is not the right kind of this application?

Secondly, the light switch box at the bottom of the stairs has two separate switches wired to two different breaker circuits. (One controls the stair lights and one controls the adjoining room light) Is this odd and against code or is it normal? Never heard of that before.
 

mud

Registered User
#21
Do either of the 2 switches say on and off (they should not)? Probably just one switch bad or got mis wired at some point
as far as the 2 breakers controlling circuits in 1 box not sure when that is or is not acceptable in the same box.

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#22
I'm having an electrical problem that may be simple, but since the gurus are here already, I'll tag on rather than making a new thread.

I have a stairway with a switch at both ends. If the top switch is on, the bottom switch will turn it off, but if the bottom switch is off, the top switch won't turn it on. Is this a wiring issue or is it because the bottom switch is not the right kind of this application?

Secondly, the light switch box at the bottom of the stairs has two separate switches wired to two different breaker circuits. (One controls the stair lights and one controls the adjoining room light) Is this odd and against code or is it normal? Never heard of that before.
Google a 3 way switch for a setup like stairs or hallways with switches at both ends. If it worked before one of the switches could be bad or worn out.

Not sure about code on that second question. I know in commercial environments they label boxes that may have circuits from separate breakers so you know to shut off both.

Makes sense code would have you label separate circuits inside a multi-gang box in a residence.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#23
I'm having an electrical problem that may be simple, but since the gurus are here already, I'll tag on rather than making a new thread.

I have a stairway with a switch at both ends. If the top switch is on, the bottom switch will turn it off, but if the bottom switch is off, the top switch won't turn it on. Is this a wiring issue or is it because the bottom switch is not the right kind of this application?

Secondly, the light switch box at the bottom of the stairs has two separate switches wired to two different breaker circuits. (One controls the stair lights and one controls the adjoining room light) Is this odd and against code or is it normal? Never heard of that before.

3 way switches are the work of the devil!
 

Haeder

South Dakota
#24
I'm having an electrical problem that may be simple, but since the gurus are here already, I'll tag on rather than making a new thread.

I have a stairway with a switch at both ends. If the top switch is on, the bottom switch will turn it off, but if the bottom switch is off, the top switch won't turn it on. Is this a wiring issue or is it because the bottom switch is not the right kind of this application?

Secondly, the light switch box at the bottom of the stairs has two separate switches wired to two different breaker circuits. (One controls the stair lights and one controls the adjoining room light) Is this odd and against code or is it normal? Never heard of that before.
Guess 1 - improperly installed 3-way switches

Guess 2 - worn out 3-way switch

Solution: purchase 2 new 3-way switches and covers and replace both for about $10. YouTube is your friend.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
#25
Didn't realize the switch may be worn out. It's likely 20 years old. I can do that and make sure I have two correct 3 ways
 
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