HVAC Question

flyerfan116

Fuckin savages
Apr 14, 2005
6,877
270
513
NJ
#1
Time to start replacing my units, central air conditioning and forced air gas heat.

I know a guy who can help me with the installation but I'm just wondering what i can expect in terms of cost of the units. Anyone have any ideas or suggestion on where to buy, or where not to buy the equipment?

Not sure on the specs of what i currently have but my house is approx. 2,000 sq. feet livable space, 2 story with a full unfinished basement and full attic, and it is zoned, upstairs and downstairs each have their own furnace and compressor. I'm only looking to replace the downstairs units at this time.

I'd estimate the units are probably 20-25 years old so I'm not too concerned with efficiency as i think anything would be an improvement.

I'm also hearing that the new popular thing is for people to steal the A/C compressors. I'm assuming this means there is some value in them? Is it worth a trip the the scrap yard?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

Haeder

South Dakota
Mar 30, 2005
5,837
4,013
608
#2
Look into an air-to-air heat pump.

Will cost a little more up front but will pay for itself in less than five years through energy savings. The cost of a heat pump system with an electric furnace was only about $500 higher than a central air system with an electric furnace. This was in a new house and included all of the labor for installing the equipment, duct work, cold air returns, etc...

Mine is set to run until the temp drops to around 15 degrees - after that the main furnace kicks in. And I live in South Dakota where it is nine times colder than fuck in the winter. In a 100% electric house, my electric bill has never been over $300 a month. Even in the witches tit coldest of months.

How does it work? Magic. Or, maybe like this.....

[yt]rqwCUcKqW9g[/yt]
 

Sinn Fein

Infidel and White Interloper
Wackbag Staff
Aug 29, 2002
31,481
2,170
818
Florida's Nature Coast
#4
I second the suggestion to get a heat pump instead of a standard air conditioning unit. However, I would still do the gas furnace. I would kill to have gas available here.

In case you aren't aware, a heat-pump is basically a central AC unit that can run in reverse to provide heat. It would be a nice backup/supplement to the gas furnace.

I have two heat pumps in a dual-zone configuration, a 3 ton unit and a 2 ton unit both have backup/secondary/emergency electric heating coils. My electric bill gets up there at times during the winter and at times in the summer, but I am running two units and have an all-electric house that is almost 3000 SF with no backup/secondary heat system. I am going to be doing a pellet stove insert for the living room fireplace this fall (if I can get the financial ducks in a row) to help keep the electric bill down.

And yes, your old units should have some scrap value.
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,052
21,078
693
Maine
#5
Presently have oil forced air... my HVAC buddy wants to put in a boiler (he gets a free one if he sells/installs 20 or 30 of them)... prob do forced water with air handlers here and there.

Still have to figure out what I am going to do for domestic hot water... my buddy wants to put a boiler buddy with a holding tank... but due to the length of this place might go for point of use/tankless water heaters.
 

JimsInfectedEye

That's very hurtful, sir.
May 21, 2005
3,526
2
323
Philadelphia
#6
I second the suggestion to get a heat pump instead of a standard air conditioning unit. However, I would still do the gas furnace. I would kill to have gas available here.

In case you aren't aware, a heat-pump is basically a central AC unit that can run in reverse to provide heat. It would be a nice backup/supplement to the gas furnace.

I have two heat pumps in a dual-zone configuration, a 3 ton unit and a 2 ton unit both have backup/secondary/emergency electric heating coils. My electric bill gets up there at times during the winter and at times in the summer, but I am running two units and have an all-electric house that is almost 3000 SF with no backup/secondary heat system. I am going to be doing a pellet stove insert for the living room fireplace this fall (if I can get the financial ducks in a row) to help keep the electric bill down.

And yes, your old units should have some scrap value.
Did ya get the letter from PECO stating they are discontinuing the heat pump discount this year? Prepare to pay out the ass for electric this winter.

I mostly do commercial work, so I'm not too up on the residential brands - however, I was able to get a great deal on a Goodman/Janitrol unit. After 4 months, I know why it was a good deal - aluminum evaporator coils (guaranteed there will be leaks there), two leaks in the condenser already, and a compressor relay cooked. (old York unit was 30 years old and didn't give me a lick of problems, but figured it was time to upgrade).
 

TomC

uppity neobarb
Aug 1, 2006
4,636
1,901
623
Charleston, SC
#8
I'm also hearing that the new popular thing is for people to steal the A/C compressors. I'm assuming this means there is some value in them? Is it worth a trip the the scrap yard?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
No, The n-persons scrap the condenser on site and leave the "compressor"due to weight, Some have a pick up take the entire unit and will still scrap off site to pull the good stuff out and get rid of M# and S#.

Also there is to many ? about a 20 to 25 year old install to recommend you try this, The min SEER unit the GOV allows is 13eer a/c and a bunch higher on gas(I do Commercial now), You will need to have your home looked at and duct work resized, Sorry. The days of the quick change out are gone due to the new seer ratings. 13 SEER units CAN NOT run on 20 year old duct work, If you do it get some kind of ex-warranty for the compressors you will be replacing. Also cant recommend brands due to you need to rep most to buy them ie: Carries, Trane, Lenox,
ps: I think it safe to say your looking $6000-$8000 equipment cost, 2 condenser and 2 gas air handlers