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Innocent Man Shot 16 Times While in His Bed

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
54,107
12,895
373
Atlanta, GA
#1
Pigs gonna pig.

http://q13fox.com/2013/07/10/shot-16-times-innocent-man-files-20-million-suit/#axzz2Yhg6em2c
Shot 16 times by officers: Innocent man files $20M suit
23 hours ago
by John Hopperstad
Q13 FOX News reporter and weekend anchor

SEATTLE — Lawyers for Dustin Theoharis, an Auburn man who was shot 16 times in his bed by a sheriff’s deputy and a DOC officer, say they are filing a $20 million lawsuit against the state Department of Corrections.

It comes on the heels of a scathing report calling for change in the King County Sheriff’s Office.

“Dustin just had his 12th surgery to reconstruct his jaw, which was basically shattered from one of the bullets,” Eric Heipt, one of the attorneys for Theoharis, said Wednesday.

The county recently agreed to pay him $3 million despite the finding that the shooting was justified.

A total of 16 bullets hit Theoharis in February 2012, when a King County sheriff’s deputy and a DOC officer opened fire on him while serving a search warrant at the Auburn home where he lived.

He wasn’t the man they were after, but officers claimed he reached for what they thought was a gun.

“Without a warrant, you shoot an unarmed man while he’s in his bed 16 times,” said Heipt. “I don’t know how you could possibly conclude that to be a justified shooting.”

That was one of the questions members of the King County Council had as they reviewed a critical report on the aftermath of the shooting.

The report was put together by Merrick Bobb, who is also overseeing reforms in the Seattle Police Department.

“I knew from the outset of this incident there needed to be a deeper review,” said Charles Gaither, the civilian overseer for the sheriff’s office. Gaither said there were several problems in how the investigation was handled.

The officers involved were not immediately interviewed, physical evidence was overlooked and moved, and the first responding supervisor, also a union representaive, acted more as an advocate for officers and less as an investigator.

John Urquhart, the current sheriff, wasn’t with the county at the time, but told the council, “I campaigned on fixing this and I have fixed this.”

Urquhart said he is implementing several policies for officer-involved shootings, including launching internal investigations at the same time any criminal investigations are under way. He’s also added high-tech shooting simulators as part of training.

“The issue isn’t whether we are reviewing shootings and use-of-force by deputies, because we are,” said Urquhart. “The issue is, are we doing a good job of it? And I don’t think we have in the past, so we need to fix that and we’re fixing that.”

Urquhart also told the council the DOC did not cooperate in the investigation, and that led the sheriff’s office to dissolve that partnership.

The DOC on Wednesday would only say it conducted its own review and found appropriate force was used.

But the lawyers for Theoharis are now filing a $20 million lawsuit against the DOC.
 
Likes: Josh_R

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
12,752
2,888
258
Sunnydale
#2
A cop could shoot an infant in the face at point blank range and call it a justifiable shooting. The 2 month old appeared to be reaching for a gun but it turned out to be a bottle.

I blame the unions.
 

JackieImpression

Registered User
Mar 25, 2013
306
302
118
#3
You anti-cop people make me laugh. Sure the police are brutal at times. And many officers belong in jail or off the force at the very least. But this is another retarded anti-cop thread with no good information about the actual shooting.

DOC Specialist Kris Rongen, assisted by sheriff's Detective Aaron Thompson, went to the house to serve a felony arrest warrant on an ex-offender — someone other than Theoharis — who had failed to report to community supervision. Two other sheriff's detectives joined them.

After taking the ex-offender, Nicholas Harrison, into custody, Thompson and Rongen learned that Theoharis was in a different part of the house, according to a summary prepared by King County prosecutors who reviewed the incident. They decided to check whether Theoharis had a gun, which would be a violation of Harrison's probation.

Rongen and Thompson headed to a dark room where Theoharis was lying in a bed.

"Specialist Rongen and Detective Thompson said that they identified themselves, gave Mr. Theoharis commands that he did not comply with, that he said he had guns, and that it appeared that he was reaching for one," according to a report by the sheriff's shooting review board.

In a written statement, Thompson said he believed Theoharis was reaching for a gun between the box spring and the mattress.

Rongen and Thompson both fired their handguns, hitting Theoharis as he rolled off the bed.

No firearms were found in the room. A flashlight was found in a pool of blood next to the bed, and an end table within reaching distance contained aluminum cans and a variety of objects, including two remote controls, according to the prosecutors' summary.

Also found in the room were heroin, needles, spoons and a scale with heroin residue, although no criminal charges were filed against Theoharis.


Okay so this guy was high on heroin. Told the police he was armed. And was living with someone who was violating parole. But hey...fuck the police. Now taxpayers are on the hook for millions of dollars because a heroin fueled junkie screamed to police that he was armed. Now let's see how the politically correct liberal though police spin this one.

Wait let me get another quote.....

According to prosecutors, Wheeler asked what had happened, and Thompson replied, "He told us he had four guns, and then he started reaching for one."

Holy shit. No wonder George Zimmerman is seen as a murderer. People believe everything they read in the fucking media without doing any research. "Man shot 16 times in bed while eating ice tea and skittles". Hilarious. Here's a more accurate headline:

"Junkie high on heroin tells cops he has four guns, reaches under bed, police open fire, wounded man lives".
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
54,107
12,895
373
Atlanta, GA
#6
You anti-cop people make me laugh. Sure the police are brutal at times. And many officers belong in jail or off the force at the very least. But this is another retarded anti-cop thread with no good information about the actual shooting.

DOC Specialist Kris Rongen, assisted by sheriff's Detective Aaron Thompson, went to the house to serve a felony arrest warrant on an ex-offender — someone other than Theoharis — who had failed to report to community supervision. Two other sheriff's detectives joined them.

After taking the ex-offender, Nicholas Harrison, into custody, Thompson and Rongen learned that Theoharis was in a different part of the house, according to a summary prepared by King County prosecutors who reviewed the incident. They decided to check whether Theoharis had a gun, which would be a violation of Harrison's probation.

Rongen and Thompson headed to a dark room where Theoharis was lying in a bed.

"Specialist Rongen and Detective Thompson said that they identified themselves, gave Mr. Theoharis commands that he did not comply with, that he said he had guns, and that it appeared that he was reaching for one," according to a report by the sheriff's shooting review board.

In a written statement, Thompson said he believed Theoharis was reaching for a gun between the box spring and the mattress.

Rongen and Thompson both fired their handguns, hitting Theoharis as he rolled off the bed.

No firearms were found in the room. A flashlight was found in a pool of blood next to the bed, and an end table within reaching distance contained aluminum cans and a variety of objects, including two remote controls, according to the prosecutors' summary.

Also found in the room were heroin, needles, spoons and a scale with heroin residue, although no criminal charges were filed against Theoharis.

Okay so this guy was high on heroin. Told the police he was armed. And was living with someone who was violating parole. But hey...fuck the police. Now taxpayers are on the hook for millions of dollars because a heroin fueled junkie screamed to police that he was armed. Now let's see how the politically correct liberal though police spin this one.

Wait let me get another quote.....

According to prosecutors, Wheeler asked what had happened, and Thompson replied, "He told us he had four guns, and then he started reaching for one."

Holy shit. No wonder George Zimmerman is seen as a murderer. People believe everything they read in the fucking media without doing any research. "Man shot 16 times in bed while eating ice tea and skittles". Hilarious. Here's a more accurate headline:

"Junkie high on heroin tells cops he has four guns, reaches under bed, police open fire, wounded man lives".
A link to your source would be nice, you lazy bum. By the way, nothing in your post addressed the questions about improprieties in the investigation.
“I knew from the outset of this incident there needed to be a deeper review,” said Charles Gaither, the civilian overseer for the sheriff’s office. Gaither said there were several problems in how the investigation was handled.

The officers involved were not immediately interviewed, physical evidence was overlooked and moved, and the first responding supervisor, also a union representative, acted more as an advocate for officers and less as an investigator.
 

TomC

uppity neobarb
Aug 1, 2006
4,625
1,883
563
Charleston, SC
#8
You anti-cop people make me laugh. Sure the police are brutal at times. And many officers belong in jail or off the force at the very least. But this is another retarded anti-cop thread with no good information about the actual shooting.

DOC Specialist Kris Rongen, assisted by sheriff's Detective Aaron Thompson, went to the house to serve a felony arrest warrant on an ex-offender — someone other than Theoharis — who had failed to report to community supervision. Two other sheriff's detectives joined them.

After taking the ex-offender, Nicholas Harrison, into custody, Thompson and Rongen learned that Theoharis was in a different part of the house, according to a summary prepared by King County prosecutors who reviewed the incident. They decided to check whether Theoharis had a gun, which would be a violation of Harrison's probation.

Rongen and Thompson headed to a dark room where Theoharis was lying in a bed.

"Specialist Rongen and Detective Thompson said that they identified themselves, gave Mr. Theoharis commands that he did not comply with, that he said he had guns, and that it appeared that he was reaching for one," according to a report by the sheriff's shooting review board.

In a written statement, Thompson said he believed Theoharis was reaching for a gun between the box spring and the mattress.

Rongen and Thompson both fired their handguns, hitting Theoharis as he rolled off the bed.

No firearms were found in the room. A flashlight was found in a pool of blood next to the bed, and an end table within reaching distance contained aluminum cans and a variety of objects, including two remote controls, according to the prosecutors' summary.

Also found in the room were heroin, needles, spoons and a scale with heroin residue, although no criminal charges were filed against Theoharis.

Okay so this guy was high on heroin. Told the police he was armed. And was living with someone who was violating parole. But hey...fuck the police. Now taxpayers are on the hook for millions of dollars because a heroin fueled junkie screamed to police that he was armed. Now let's see how the politically correct liberal though police spin this one.

Wait let me get another quote.....

According to prosecutors, Wheeler asked what had happened, and Thompson replied, "He told us he had four guns, and then he started reaching for one."

Holy shit. No wonder George Zimmerman is seen as a murderer. People believe everything they read in the fucking media without doing any research. "Man shot 16 times in bed while eating ice tea and skittles". Hilarious. Here's a more accurate headline:

"Junkie high on heroin tells cops he has four guns, reaches under bed, police open fire, wounded man lives".
So, they entered the dark room, both identified them selves, and had a conversation with the guy about him having 4 guns, and then shot him 16 times. RIGHT
MY GUESS is they kicked in the bedroom door of some junkie, he jumped trying to hide his dope, and the cops shot him before they thought twice.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
578
Akron, Ohio
#18
You anti-cop people make me laugh. Sure the police are brutal at times. And many officers belong in jail or off the force at the very least. But this is another retarded anti-cop thread with no good information about the actual shooting.

...
Holy shit. No wonder George Zimmerman is seen as a murderer. People believe everything they read in the fucking media without doing any research. "Man shot 16 times in bed while eating ice tea and skittles". Hilarious. Here's a more accurate headline:

"Junkie high on heroin tells cops he has four guns, reaches under bed, police open fire, wounded man lives".
Here's a question: why is the threshold for shooting so low for police, but not anyone else? I think you said you just recently became a cop, right? What would you do if you arrived on a scene and there were two people there, one standing and one dead on the ground. You ask the live one what happened and he says "we were having an argument and he reached into his pocket, I thought he was reaching for a gun, so I shot him". In most (if not all) states, one must credibly feel that they are at risk of death or severe bodily injury. Just having a feeling that someone was going to shoot you is not a good enough defense. Would you arrest that guy, and would he be charged with murder? I would imagine so.

So why are there so many reports of police shooting someone because they thought he might have been reaching for a gun (or was holding a cell phone, water hose nozzle, wallet, etc.) and they are ruled justified with no charges? The threshold for a cop being able to justifiably shoot someone is so low, that all they have to do is say "I THOUGHT he MIGHT have been reaching for a weapon", and yet an ordinary citizen in a similar situation must almost always prove that there was in fact a credible threat to his life.

I think we all agree that being a cop is a stressful and dangerous job and most of them perform admirably most of the time, but what amounts to "I was scared" should not instantly justify someone losing their life.

If this makes you feel any better, here is a police use of force that I actually agree with:
http://www.nbc-2.com/story/22815785/fm-police-officer-arreste-for-using-excessive-force#.Ud8hjazm8gg
The cop punched a guy who was actively resisting, not after he was in cuffs, not kicking him in the face, not beating him with a baton. It looked justified to me.
FORT MYERS, FL -​


A Fort Myers police officer was fired for excessive use of force after a February incident that was captured on dashcam video.
The Fort Myers Police Department fired Officer Trevor Lehman. According to the department, he was fired for overreaction, profanity and excessive use of force.
The incident happened back in February.
The dashcam video shows a struggle between Lehman and the man being arrested. You can watch the entire 28-minute video below. (If on mobile, click here to see the video)
According to the department, Lehman's actions were excessive.
Eventually four more officers arrived to help.
According to police reports, the man being arrested - Chaylon McClary - had been driving and police knew he had a suspended license.
McClary has a long criminal history in Lee County. He's been arrested 12 times since 2004 for crimes including habitual traffic offender, smuggling drugs in the jail and armed robbery.
We talked with Lehman's attorney, who says they are filing an appeal of the department's decision.
We have a public records request for all of the documents in this case -- we're told they're being put together right now.
We also plan on speaking with Chief Baker later this afternoon.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
5,847
458
578
Akron, Ohio
#19
I just happened to come across this article that actually explains my questions above:
http://www.salon.com/2013/07/13/rad...ets_a_swat_team_you_want_to_use_it/singleton/

That in part goes back to the fact that no politician really wants to look anti-police officer, and so the unions have negotiated in a lot of states the Police Officer Bill of Rights, which give rights to cops above and beyond what regular citizens get when they’re accused of a crime.
In theory, the Police Officer Bill of Rights only applies to internal investigations; it doesn’t affect criminal investigations. Problem is, criminal investigations usually don’t start until after the internal investigation is over and at that point the police officers have been given time to put a story together. A lot of times they’re allowed to collaborate with other police officers who are involved and the other thing it does is it gives cops within the department a handy way to get the charges against other cops dismissed.
 
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