Jersey actually passes a Good Law, about time.

MJMANDALAY

Registered User
Jan 26, 2005
13,145
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#1
New N.J. Law Requires Pharmacies to Fill Orders No Matter Beliefs


TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- New Jersey pharmacies must now fill prescriptions for any drug they stock or locate another nearby pharmacy that carries the drug regardless of any religious and philosophical beliefs held by their employees.

The new law signed Friday by Gov. Jon S. Corzine is largely designed to ensure women retain access to birth-control pills and emergency contraception.

"Discussions of morals and matters of conscience are admirable, but should not come into play when subjective beliefs conflict with objective medical decisions,'' said state Sen. Joseph Vitale, D-Middlesex, a bill sponsor.

Corzine signed the bill just days after Pope Benedict XVI said pharmacists have a right to use conscientious objection to avoid dispensing emergency contraception or euthanasia drugs.

"Pharmacists must seek to raise people's awareness so that all human beings are protected from conception to natural death, and so that medicines truly play a therapeutic role,'' the pope said on Monday.

But state Sen. Fred Madden, another bill sponsor, said new law ensures equal access to health care.

"People choosing to work in the medical field must be able to put aside their personal feelings and work together toward one common goal -- to help protect the health and well-being of patients,'' said Madden, D-Gloucester.

The American Pharmacists Association, the nation's largest association of pharmacists, supports legislation similar to New Jersey's that requires individual pharmacists or pharmacy chains to fill prescriptions or provide immediate referral to another pharmacy.

The New Jersey law was opposed by abortion opponents.

"This bill sends a chilling message to individuals with religious or philosophical beliefs, that if they are pharmacists they need not apply in the state of New Jersey,'' said Marie Tasy of New Jersey Right to Life.

According to the National Women's Law Center, New Jersey becomes the 12th state with a law requiring pharmacies to either dispense a drug or refer customers elsewhere.

Four states -- Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi and South Dakota -- permit pharmacists to refuse to dispense a prescription.




Oh yea and FUCK the pope and the church
 
Dec 25, 2005
10,005
172
513
NJ
#3
That's just friggin pompous of religous asses to think they even have the right to refuse legal therapy to an individual.

Fuck religion. Shut up & make up another chapter in your stupid storybook.
 

Sprite

permanent case of the Moooondays
Apr 27, 2005
3,834
2
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Jersey
#4
A law that makes sense AND pisses off the bible thumpers - AMAZING!

:clap:
 

Hudson

Supreme Champion!!!!!
Donator
Jan 14, 2002
32,840
4,566
898
Land of misfit toys
#5
Well hangers and Hotel towels were not cost effective from Corzines viewpoint
 

weakside

He was stupid. I was lucky. I will visit him soon.
Dec 9, 2004
3,871
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California
#6
I‘m surprised any state could deny medication based of religious beliefs, but I guess I shouldn't be.
 

brose

No ticky, no laundry
Dec 27, 2006
224
0
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Springfield, MO
#7
Ok, first of all, the state does not deny medication anywhere; it is the individual pharmacists choice to dispense the item or not. Second of all, it is not only the "religious nut job" pharmacists who refuse to dispense this stuff.

I am a pharmacist, and personally I have no problem with Plan B or birthcontrol. However, I respect a pharmacists right to make a moral or ethical decision on which medications they fill just as I respect a physicians right to decide what procedures he/she will perform. There are a lot of doctors out there that will not give a girl an option to perform an abortion, or even refer them to a place that will. Why isn't there a law mandating that?

As for this law, I have one major problem with it at least before I have read the exact wording of it. It seems to me this could develop into quite the slippery slope. Will I be forced to fill a prescription that I object to, for reasons other than moral or religious, or will it specifically pertain to Plan B and birth control? From the wording of the article, I don't think it is specific to just those two drugs. This law holds the potential to strip pharmacists of any degree of autonomy we have, and make us only the physicians puppet. Most of you probably have no problem with that because you only see us as glorified cashiers at walgreens or wal-mart anyway, but the truth of the matter is I have spent too many years earning my doctorate degree to roll over and ignore any objection I may have to something a physician is doing.
 

Treat_Yourself

Registered User
Nov 17, 2006
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#8
Ok, first of all, the state does not deny medication anywhere; it is the individual pharmacists choice to dispense the item or not. Second of all, it is not only the "religious nut job" pharmacists who refuse to dispense this stuff.

I am a pharmacist, and personally I have no problem with Plan B or birthcontrol. However, I respect a pharmacists right to make a moral or ethical decision on which medications they fill just as I respect a physicians right to decide what procedures he/she will perform. There are a lot of doctors out there that will not give a girl an option to perform an abortion, or even refer them to a place that will. Why isn't there a law mandating that?

As for this law, I have one major problem with it at least before I have read the exact wording of it. It seems to me this could develop into quite the slippery slope. Will I be forced to fill a prescription that I object to, for reasons other than moral or religious, or will it specifically pertain to Plan B and birth control? From the wording of the article, I don't think it is specific to just those two drugs. This law holds the potential to strip pharmacists of any degree of autonomy we have, and make us only the physicians puppet. Most of you probably have no problem with that because you only see us as glorified cashiers at walgreens or wal-mart anyway, but the truth of the matter is I have spent too many years earning my doctorate degree to roll over and ignore any objection I may have to something a physician is doing.
I can see what you're saying, but this law doesn't compel the pharmacist to prescribe medicine that he personally has a moral objection to. He can simply tell the customer to go get that prescription filled at the place accross town.


New Jersey pharmacies must now fill prescriptions for any drug they stock or locate another nearby pharmacy that carries the drug
In addition I don't see how this even became an issue. I can't see why the big chain pharmacies would even hire a pharmacist that refuses to sell certain prescriptions and there can't be that many little independent pharmacies left. I only know of two in my area. It would be like Burger King hiring a vegan cashier who would only agree to see french fries and onion rings. I don't know how this even became an issue.
 

mascan42

Registered User
Aug 26, 2002
18,962
5,762
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Ronkonkoma, Long Island
#9
IIn addition I don't see how this even became an issue. I can't see why the big chain pharmacies would even hire a pharmacist that refuses to sell certain prescriptions and there can't be that many little independent pharmacies left. I only know of two in my area. It would be like Burger King hiring a vegan cashier who would only agree to see french fries and onion rings. I don't know how this even became an issue.
If it was in East Bumfuck, Kentucky, where they don't have big chain stores (and probably don't even have a second pharmacy they could send somebody to), I could see how it could come up. But in NJ, I don't see how this could be a problem.
 

weakside

He was stupid. I was lucky. I will visit him soon.
Dec 9, 2004
3,871
0
0
California
#10
I‘m surprised any state could deny medication based of religious beliefs, but I guess I shouldn't be.
What I meant to say is that I'm surprised any state would allow a pharmacist to deny any medication based on moral grounds. That just seems wacky and ripe for a lawsuit. Even if there are other pharmacies in the general area willing to dispense the drug I could see someone claiming (though I don’t necessarily agree) that it would be a hardship to go to another pharmacy for whatever reason.

I have a lot of respect for pharmacists but this is overstepping their bounds in my opinion.

In addition to what someone already brought up, I'm also surprised pharmacies (unless they are small, independently owned ones) would even let this happen. This has to be some outdated, unused law that New Jersey just now decided to fix.
 

weakside

He was stupid. I was lucky. I will visit him soon.
Dec 9, 2004
3,871
0
0
California
#11
It would be like Burger King hiring a vegan cashier who would only agree to see french fries and onion rings. I don't know how this even became an issue.
That is a damn good point. :clap:

I wonder how often it actually happened where a pharmacist denied a drug because it was against their moral beliefs?
 

kloraferm

Humor is reason gone mad
Sep 6, 2002
31,366
41
783
Staten Island, NY
#12
That's just friggin pompous of religous asses to think they even have the right to refuse legal therapy to an individual.

Fuck religion. Shut up & make up another chapter in your stupid storybook.
Religion is one of the absolute worst things ever devised by humanity.
 

brose

No ticky, no laundry
Dec 27, 2006
224
0
0
Springfield, MO
#13
It actually never became a problem until PlanB came around. There were a handful of pharmacists who refused to fill birth control becaues they were catholic, but that was few and far between. I think the main problem is some pharmacists who have been out for years don't understand fully the mechanism behind PlanB. I think there is a misconception that it is similar to RU486, which actually aborts a growing fetus.

However, other pharmacists disagree on grounds outside of morality. I have my issues with PlanB, particularly being over-the-counter. There have been no long-term studies on negative health-impacts, especially in "abusers" of Emergency Contraception (those who get it every month or so). We do know there is serious risk associated with other hormonal replacement, such as blood clots, heart attack, and stroke and possibly endometrial cancers. So I think refusing to fill for a chronic abuser of this medication is not only warranted, but is in the best interest of the patient who doesn't understand the risks involved because WE don't even know the risks involved.

I do find it irresponsible for pharmacists to refuse to fill and refuse to refer to another pharmacy, and I have no problem if that is what the law states. But my impression of the law, similar to other states laws (i.e. Illinois), was that you can under no grounds refuse said prescription. That is where I take issue with the law, because there are circumstances in play outside of just preventing pregnancy.

And, to answer the question about big chain pharmacies allowing this to happen. Its all about money. There is practically NO profit in selling PlanB, and really birth control in general, so a handful of pharmacists refusing to fill it here and there was never a big issue.

And, while I understand your point about a vegan BK cashier, I take offense to it as well. Pharmacists play a much more important role in your healthcare than most would like to know, most of the time you would have no idea how many fuck ups we catch on a daily basis that could kill you. Like I said before, a lot of you here and throughout the world have the impression that we are "glorified" cashiers, and some pharmacists definantely don't break that stereotype; but for those of us who do keep current on medical literature and do our best to keep people healthy, its a real slap in the face. But again, refusal to fill certain prescriptions is based on science not on religion although some like to make it about religion.
 

brose

No ticky, no laundry
Dec 27, 2006
224
0
0
Springfield, MO
#14
Yuck, I sound like a douche saying it "offends" me.:icon_redf

It doesn't really offend me, more just pisses me off; and I know you didn't mean any offense by making that analogy, so I'm not taking it out on you Treat_Yourself. But I hope you can see how that can tick a fella off being compared to a BK cashier:action-sm
 

Treat_Yourself

Registered User
Nov 17, 2006
548
0
0
#15
Yuck, I sound like a douche saying it "offends" me.:icon_redf

It doesn't really offend me, more just pisses me off; and I know you didn't mean any offense by making that analogy, so I'm not taking it out on you Treat_Yourself. But I hope you can see how that can tick a fella off being compared to a BK cashier:action-sm
I didn't really mean to say that pharmacists are on the same level as a burger king cashier. I just needed an analogy where the employee refuses to sell something his employer offers because it offends his morality.