Jorge H.W. May Be a Spooky Ghost

tattered

Uber-Aryan
Wackbag Staff
#26
Government drones.....

Poor guy, one term president who couldn’t complete with a clown that liked fat chicks, smoking pot and blowing his horn
Thats what happens when you cant keep the one and only campaign promise you made. He swore down up left left A right down that he wouldnt raise taxes. Which is seriously the one promise a president should never make because ya just might have to. Reagan promised to cut taxes which he did then re raised them. Technically he kept his promise. Bush had to raise them n not keep his promise
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
#28
Perot was part of it but it was more what i posted above
He also hit a “lead off home run” with the war in Iraq, but, he never actually finished it or, drug it out long enough that people actually remembered it happening when it came time to vote, he really never had a chance against slick silly
 

tattered

Uber-Aryan
Wackbag Staff
#29
He also hit a “lead off home run” with the war in Iraq, but, he never actually finished it or, drug it out long enough that people actually remembered it happening when it came time to vote, he really never had a chance against slick silly
That shit should of been a lead off and walk off home run if he played it right
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
#30
Perot was part of it but it was more what i posted above
I don’t remember the actual numbers, but I thought the conventional wisdom was that Bush probably would have eeked it out if Perot wasn’t in the race. But anyway, I do seem to recall a time when Bush was considered unbeatable (I kind of remember an SNL sketch from the era and it was called “the race to avoid being the guy who loses to Bush” or something like that. And it was all the likely Dem candidates at the time trying to urge the public how awful they would be. I remember Phil Hartman as Mario Cuomo repeatedly affirming he was mobbed up.)
 

jnoble

Lingering longer for a longering linger
#33
I don’t remember the actual numbers, but I thought the conventional wisdom was that Bush probably would have eeked it out if Perot wasn’t in the race. But anyway, I do seem to recall a time when Bush was considered unbeatable (I kind of remember an SNL sketch from the era and it was called “the race to avoid being the guy who loses to Bush” or something like that. And it was all the likely Dem candidates at the time trying to urge the public how awful they would be. I remember Phil Hartman as Mario Cuomo repeatedly affirming he was mobbed up.)
Oh yes.....once upon a time when SNL's political comedy was well done and really funny and not openly hostile toward either side
 

Wrecktum

Tounge puncher of fart boxes
#37
We'll get another for Carter soon , I think
He's 94
Word on the street is Trump might give all the fed employees off Christmas eve too.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

maz

TRueWDTer
#39
Word on the street is Trump might give all the fed employees off Christmas eve too.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

Not holding my breath , but I'd accept that
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#43
Grumman TBF Avenger. Early models only came with 1 nose mounted 30cal machine gun later models had 2 wing mounted 50cals. They really didnt do a ton of strafing as they were torpedo bombers. Theyd drop a torpedo or a couple bombs. Maybe fire a few rockets then peel off to re-arm. Believe it or not though it had a 3 man crew. Pilot, upper ball gunner and a belly gunner. The belly gunner would do most of the strafing as the plane would fly over the target ship after dropping its bombs or rockets. Good ole H.W. didnt fly many missions thou as he got shot down and spent a good week or so floating in a raft then had to spend a couple months recouping iirc. Not sure if he ever made it back to the pacific after that
He did well just to survive. I think American Torpedo bombers experienced a 90% loss rate. They were junk and their Torpedoes were nearly always duds. They should have invested in more dive bomber squadrons.
 

tattered

Uber-Aryan
Wackbag Staff
#44
He did well just to survive. I think American Torpedo bombers experienced a 90% loss rate. They were junk and their Torpedoes were nearly always duds. They should have invested in more dive bomber squadrons.
Personally i think they should of made a navy version of the p51. The p48 lightning was good against the zero and the hellcat could take a beating as a dual roll but the mustang would of done both rolls better. The corsair was ok. It looked cool thou.
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#45
Personally i think they should of made a navy version of the p51. The p48 lightning was good against the zero and the hellcat could take a beating as a dual roll but the mustang would of done both rolls better. The corsair was ok. It looked cool thou.
They actually tried to create naval variant, but it didn't have good low speed characteristics. It would stall at low speeds and wasn't very maneuverable.
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
#47
Nice words from Bill:


Clinton: George H.W. Bush’s Oval Office note revealed who he truly was
By Bill Clinton
On Jan. 20, 1993, I entered the Oval Office for the first time as president. As is the tradition, waiting for me was a note from my predecessor, George Herbert Walker Bush. It read:

Dear Bill,
When I walked into this office just now I felt the same sense of wonder and respect that I felt four years ago. I know you will feel that, too.
I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some Presidents have described.
There will be very tough times, made even more difficult by criticism you may not think is fair. I’m not a very good one to give advice; but just don’t let the critics discourage you or push you off course.
You will be our President when you read this note. I wish you well. I wish your family well.
Your success now is our country’s success. I am rooting hard for you.
Good Luck — George​
No words of mine or others can better reveal the heart of who he was than those he wrote himself. He was an honorable, gracious and decent man who believed in the United States, our Constitution, our institutions and our shared future. And he believed in his duty to defend and strengthen them, in victory and defeat. He also had a natural humanity, always hoping with all his heart that others’ journeys would include some of the joy that his family, his service and his adventures gave him.

His friendship has been one of the great gifts of my life. From Indonesia to Houston, from the Katrina-ravaged Gulf Coast to Kennebunkport — where just a few months ago we shared our last visit, as he was surrounded by his family but clearly missing Barbara — I cherished every opportunity I had to learn and laugh with him. I just loved him.

Many people were surprised at our relationship, considering we were once political adversaries. Despite our considerable differences, I had admired many of his accomplishments as president, especially his foreign-policy decisions in managing America’s response to the end of the Cold War and his willingness to work with governors of both parties to establish national education goals. Even more important, though he could be tough in a political fight, he was in it for the right reasons: People always came before politics, patriotism before partisanship.

Modal TriggerGeorge H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via AP
While we maintained a respectful, friendly relationship throughout my presidency, it was only when President George W. Bush asked us to jointly spearhead American relief efforts in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 and again after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 that we got to really know each other. When we met with children who lost their parents in the tsunami, he was moved almost to tears when they gave us drawings they’d made to capture their pain. When we were asked to speak together at Tulane’s graduation in 2006, I saw his genuine feeling for the students, many of whom had suffered in the flooding of New Orleans, and others who had shown heroism and love in caring for their neighbors. “Each of you here has inspired me,” he told them. “When I look at our world, the good I see far outweighs the bad, which maybe explains why I am a real optimist about the future that you all will be facing.”

Growing old did not rob him of his optimism or his love of competition and adventure. In his book of letters, there’s a wonderful one to his family about getting older, in which he crows about driving his speedboat. “Still want to compete. I still drive Fidelity II fast — very fast. My best so far — 63 mph in a slight chop with one [Secret Service] agent on board.” I took more than one ride in that boat with him over the years. It was fun but not an experience for the faint of heart. It was the same driving spirit, coupled with heartfelt patriotism, that led him to volunteer for the Navy on his 18th birthday instead of attending Yale. Even when he was later shot out of the sky, he never feared to go up again — famously learning to skydive at 75.

After the war, he took a leap of faith by staking his and his family’s future in the Texas oil business and eventually got into politics. Fifty years ago this spring, as a congressman representing Houston, he voted for the Fair Housing Act of 1968, going against his nearly perfect record of conservative votes in Washington. When he returned to Houston, he held a town hall to explain his vote to a hostile crowd. He believed he could convince them it was the right thing to do, as long as they would hear him out. That evening, at least, he was right. When he was finished talking he got a standing ovation.

Given what politics looks like today, it’s easy to sigh and say George H.W. Bush belonged to an era that is gone and never coming back — where our opponents are not our enemies, where we are open to different ideas and changing our minds, where facts matter and where our devotion to our children’s future leads to honest compromise and shared progress. I know what he would say: “Nonsense. It’s your duty to get that America back.”

We should all give thanks for George H.W. Bush’s long, good life and honor it by searching, as he always did, for the most American way forward.

Bill Clinton was the 42nd President of the United States
 

Bobobie

Registered User
#48
Clinton: He also left me a fine Cuban Cigar in the Desk. I don't smoke, but found a good use for it.

Nice words from Bill:


Clinton: George H.W. Bush’s Oval Office note revealed who he truly was
By Bill Clinton
On Jan. 20, 1993, I entered the Oval Office for the first time as president. As is the tradition, waiting for me was a note from my predecessor, George Herbert Walker Bush. It read:

Dear Bill,​
When I walked into this office just now I felt the same sense of wonder and respect that I felt four years ago. I know you will feel that, too.​
I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some Presidents have described.​
There will be very tough times, made even more difficult by criticism you may not think is fair. I’m not a very good one to give advice; but just don’t let the critics discourage you or push you off course.​
You will be our President when you read this note. I wish you well. I wish your family well.​
Your success now is our country’s success. I am rooting hard for you.​
Good Luck — George​
No words of mine or others can better reveal the heart of who he was than those he wrote himself. He was an honorable, gracious and decent man who believed in the United States, our Constitution, our institutions and our shared future. And he believed in his duty to defend and strengthen them, in victory and defeat. He also had a natural humanity, always hoping with all his heart that others’ journeys would include some of the joy that his family, his service and his adventures gave him.

His friendship has been one of the great gifts of my life. From Indonesia to Houston, from the Katrina-ravaged Gulf Coast to Kennebunkport — where just a few months ago we shared our last visit, as he was surrounded by his family but clearly missing Barbara — I cherished every opportunity I had to learn and laugh with him. I just loved him.

Many people were surprised at our relationship, considering we were once political adversaries. Despite our considerable differences, I had admired many of his accomplishments as president, especially his foreign-policy decisions in managing America’s response to the end of the Cold War and his willingness to work with governors of both parties to establish national education goals. Even more important, though he could be tough in a political fight, he was in it for the right reasons: People always came before politics, patriotism before partisanship.

Modal TriggerGeorge H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum via AP
While we maintained a respectful, friendly relationship throughout my presidency, it was only when President George W. Bush asked us to jointly spearhead American relief efforts in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 and again after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 that we got to really know each other. When we met with children who lost their parents in the tsunami, he was moved almost to tears when they gave us drawings they’d made to capture their pain. When we were asked to speak together at Tulane’s graduation in 2006, I saw his genuine feeling for the students, many of whom had suffered in the flooding of New Orleans, and others who had shown heroism and love in caring for their neighbors. “Each of you here has inspired me,” he told them. “When I look at our world, the good I see far outweighs the bad, which maybe explains why I am a real optimist about the future that you all will be facing.”

Growing old did not rob him of his optimism or his love of competition and adventure. In his book of letters, there’s a wonderful one to his family about getting older, in which he crows about driving his speedboat. “Still want to compete. I still drive Fidelity II fast — very fast. My best so far — 63 mph in a slight chop with one [Secret Service] agent on board.” I took more than one ride in that boat with him over the years. It was fun but not an experience for the faint of heart. It was the same driving spirit, coupled with heartfelt patriotism, that led him to volunteer for the Navy on his 18th birthday instead of attending Yale. Even when he was later shot out of the sky, he never feared to go up again — famously learning to skydive at 75.

After the war, he took a leap of faith by staking his and his family’s future in the Texas oil business and eventually got into politics. Fifty years ago this spring, as a congressman representing Houston, he voted for the Fair Housing Act of 1968, going against his nearly perfect record of conservative votes in Washington. When he returned to Houston, he held a town hall to explain his vote to a hostile crowd. He believed he could convince them it was the right thing to do, as long as they would hear him out. That evening, at least, he was right. When he was finished talking he got a standing ovation.

Given what politics looks like today, it’s easy to sigh and say George H.W. Bush belonged to an era that is gone and never coming back — where our opponents are not our enemies, where we are open to different ideas and changing our minds, where facts matter and where our devotion to our children’s future leads to honest compromise and shared progress. I know what he would say: “Nonsense. It’s your duty to get that America back.”

We should all give thanks for George H.W. Bush’s long, good life and honor it by searching, as he always did, for the most American way forward.

Bill Clinton was the 42nd President of the United States
 
#49
Actually drove by Walker's point in Kennebunkport last night... there were 4 local(ish) news vans from Portland and Bawferston but no CNN or MSNBC etc...
 
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