Movie Last Movie You Watched Part 2

Pigdango

Silence, you mortal Fuck!
Donator
It got the wheels a turning which you can't say for many films.
In my opinion, the first ever movie in a supposed brand new genre has no right to be so completely meta, and so fast. Turned out the meta was all the movie had, and i really think there is more to the concept than that. It annoyed me because I feel like they’ve ruined it before it ever got a chance to get going.

But I’m ok if I’m in the minority, and would be glad to be wrong that they’ve already ruined it. Maybe the next people to take a crack at it will actually have a story/stories to tell.
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
Donator
In my opinion, the first ever movie in a supposed brand new genre has no right to be so completely meta, and so fast. Turned out the meta was all the movie had, and i really think there is more to the concept than that. It annoyed me because I feel like they’ve ruined it before it ever got a chance to get going.

But I’m ok if I’m in the minority, and would be glad to be wrong that they’ve already ruined it. Maybe the next people to take a crack at it will actually have a story/stories to tell.
I don't totally disagree but I was okay with the concept being the movie. I only needed the movie to facilitate the concept. Since it is the first ever in a new genre, that was enough. I did think there was going to be more to it though.

I'm not even sure it should be a genre but when I think about it that way, it is more disappointing.
 

Pigdango

Silence, you mortal Fuck!
Donator
I don't totally disagree but I was okay with the concept being the movie. I only needed the movie to facilitate the concept. Since it is the first ever in a new genre, that was enough. I did think there was going to be more to it though.

I'm not even sure it should be a genre but when I think about it that way, it is more disappointing.
I guess Netflix developed a whole bunch of new technology for it, so it stands to reason they are going to make more use of it.
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
Donator
I guess Netflix developed a whole bunch of new technology for it, so it stands to reason they are going to make more use of it.
That means the genre will almost certainly suck but I don't think this movie will be the one to blame.
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
Donator
You could make a crazy movie with this technology if it were put in the hands of right writer/director. I'm not sure what that movie is but it's there.

Maybe Pig thought that's what this was going to be and so did I but I'm okay with it not being this one as long as it is made someday.
 

Opie&JimmyShow

Well-Known Member
Donator
Molly's Game. Goddam Jessica Chastain is insanely hot. My God. The movie was a little slow but enjoyable. 7/10
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
Oscar bait

Vice (2018). The storytelling gimmick from The Big Short doesn't really work here, and reveal of who narrator Jesse Plemons is was cheesy and took up way too much time in an already bloated movie. Bale is great, but you can't not hear the Batman voice. Carell hams it up in every scene. Tyler Perry is again better in someone else's movie. Infrequently mildly funny but mostly boring, which should be impossible recounting 40 years in the life of someone as polarizing as Dick Cheney. There's a mid-credits scene that cements just how awful this is.

Green Book (2018). Same length as Vice, but felt like half as long. "True" story of bouncer Viggo Mortensen taking a job driving jazz pianist Mahershala Ali to his gigs across the south in the early 60s. Those two are fantastic, their interaction is hilarious, and fuck anyone bitching about historical inaccuracies. It's a comedy from the guy who brought us Dumb and Dumber, not a goddamn documentary. I didn't even know Ali's character was a real person until the credits rolled.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
Oscar bait

Vice (2018). The storytelling gimmick from The Big Short doesn't really work here, and reveal of who narrator Jesse Plemons is was cheesy and took up way too much time in an already bloated movie. Bale is great, but you can't not hear the Batman voice. Carell hams it up in every scene. Tyler Perry is again better in someone else's movie. Infrequently mildly funny but mostly boring, which should be impossible recounting 40 years in the life of someone as polarizing as Dick Cheney. There's a mid-credits scene that cements just how awful this is.

Green Book (2018). Same length as Vice, but felt like half as long. "True" story of bouncer Viggo Mortensen taking a job driving jazz pianist Mahershala Ali to his gigs across the south in the early 60s. Those two are fantastic, their interaction is hilarious, and fuck anyone bitching about historical inaccuracies. It's a comedy from the guy who brought us Dumb and Dumber, not a goddamn documentary. I didn't even know Ali's character was a real person until the credits rolled.
I liked Vice but that was 95% Christian Bale's performance. Though I would have liked more Rockwell.

I agree The Big Short style didn't work with this, mostly because it was used very inconsistently. It would be going along like a normal (albeit well done) movie and then it would have a brief spurt of that style then go back to a normal movie. Do something more zany and satiric or stick with straight forward darkly comic.

I didn't mind the mid-credits scene.

I still haven't seen Green Book. I wasn't planning on it. But I like how it has both sides crying for being too liberal and too conservative at the same time.

EDIT: Another thing about Vice is the post 9/11 stuff is conceptually more interesting than the pre, but in the movie I was more interested in the pre stuff.
 
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Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
Mid90s (2018). Cementing the sincerity of his heartfelt apology after telling paparazzi "suck my dick, you faggot," Jonah Hill wrote and directed this story of five skateboarders who call each other faggot, retarded, or nigga dozens of times. And some other stuff happens. Then the credits roll. It's got a few funny parts, and the main cast works really well together, but they deserved a better movie.

Past Midnight (1991). After 15 years in prison for stabbing his pregnant wife to death, Rutger Hauer's social worker/ski bunny Natasha Richardson falls for him and starts investigating his innocence. Whatever entertainment value this had came from Quentin Tarantino's script doctoring and Natasha's tits, plus a small role for young Paul Giamatti as a retard. The "did he or didn't he" plot isn't suspenseful, and fat Hauer is too much of a weirdo to be a believable crush for Natasha. I have no idea why I even watched this.
 

DiggerNick

Well-Known Member
Donator
I caught STANDOFF (2015) on Netflix, a tight little thriller with Thomas Jane and Laurence Fishburne. The kind of mid-range flick that floods streaming services these days, and video store shelves in years past. You know, the ones usually starring Nic Cage. Or Bruce Willis for ten minutes minutes.

But this one is much better than most of those. And it's fun watching Fishburne give one hell of a Samuel L. Jackson impression throughout.
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
Netflix...why?

Bird Box (2018). I don't get why this is so popular. It was trending on Twitter the weekend it popped up, with blindfolded rowboating Sandra Bullock memes everywhere. Its IMDb vote count dwarfs almost every other Netflix "original" and it's only been out three weeks. The whole "it kills you if you see it" plot device is similar to the "it kills you if it hears you" theme of A Quiet Place, which is way better, and that movie actually shows you what "it" is. Sarah Paulson is wasted in what's barely a cameo. The boat scenes drag on and on. The ending is a little too cute. I guess if you've been eating Netflix turds for months, even a stale PB&J is pretty good. Speaking of turds...

Roma (2018). Alfonso Cuaron followed up the highly overrated Gravity with this somehow even more overrated fuckery. It's even in the IMDb Top 250. It's ostensibly about the maid for a Mexican family in the early 70s as the husband leaves for Canada on "research." The first hour looks like high quality security cam footage. Nearly every scene is either a distant static shot of some mundane conversation or a slow precise panning shot left following the maid somewhere, usually in a circle. Sometimes Cuaron changes thing up and pans right. Because he's a fucking auteur. The second half has what would be a tremendous beach scene if it wasn't so poorly edited, and/or if I gave any kind of fuck about everything that came before.

@Hog's Big Ben

Can't remember if you commented on either of these, but if you haven't, next twofer?

Roma
The White Ribbon
I've never heard of The White Ribbon but it's impossible to be worse than Roma.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
Netflix...why?

Bird Box (2018). I don't get why this is so popular. It was trending on Twitter the weekend it popped up, with blindfolded rowboating Sandra Bullock memes everywhere. Its IMDb vote count dwarfs almost every other Netflix "original" and it's only been out three weeks. The whole "it kills you if you see it" plot device is similar to the "it kills you if it hears you" theme of A Quiet Place, which is way better, and that movie actually shows you what "it" is. Sarah Paulson is wasted in what's barely a cameo. The boat scenes drag on and on. The ending is a little too cute. I guess if you've been eating Netflix turds for months, even a stale PB&J is pretty good. Speaking of turds...

Roma (2018). Alfonso Cuaron followed up the highly overrated Gravity with this somehow even more overrated fuckery. It's even in the IMDb Top 250. It's ostensibly about the maid for a Mexican family in the early 70s as the husband leaves for Canada on "research." The first hour looks like high quality security cam footage. Nearly every scene is either a distant static shot of some mundane conversation or a slow precise panning shot left following the maid somewhere, usually in a circle. Sometimes Cuaron changes thing up and pans right. Because he's a fucking auteur. The second half has what would be a tremendous beach scene if it wasn't so poorly edited, and/or if I gave any kind of fuck about everything that came before.



I've never heard of The White Ribbon but it's impossible to be worse than Roma.
Bird Box - It felt like two derivative movies wrapped up in one. Night of the Living Dead with all the house crap and them trying to get to Haven. I want to say the NOTLD segment was more interesting, but it also felt like there wasn't much to the getting to Haven so it's unfair to make the comparison. If they had more set pieces surrounding that, maybe? I was mostly bored with it. I could talk about some of the stuff that irritated me, like the five year jump. I would have been more interested in that time because their resources would have dwindled significantly during that period, but they didn't. How they didn't seem to protect the house at all during that time. How we never learn what happens at night - or maybe we did and I nodded off during it. Regardless, most of this seems to happen during the day. Or how fucking irritating Lady Cartman was. But it's not worth the effort.

Roma - I did not hate it nearly as much as you did. I mean, I didn't hate it at all, whereas you seem to despise it with a passion. But whether I actually liked it is another question. There are movies that you and @Stormrider666 watch and you're like "I can see why people call it a classic." "Did you like it?" "Well, I can see why people call it a classic." That's how I felt with this. I thought it looked great and probably the winner for Cinematography, but anything beyond that? No. I don't know if this is going to make sense, but it's a movie that feels exactly like the type of movie that it wants to be and the type of movie it is. But can I say I felt anything while watching it? Maybe I need to see it a second time.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
I did watch Bandersnatch last weekend; I just noticed the discussion. The Netflix appearance initially bothered me, then the more I went down the Netflix paths the more I was okay with it because they did stuff with it other than the post credit scene. Overall, it was an interesting experiment I liked playing with, then I grew bored, then I started liking it again, then I grew bored, then I stopped. I wish there was a way to go back to certain choices because there were a couple I wanted to make (not killing the dad, dialing the right number on the phone), but it wouldn't let me, and I'm not interested enough in the story to watch it again. But I did get the classic Black Mirror ending of "protagonist randomly dies in a chair due to tech beyond his control." After that, I'd only be interested if there was a happy ending.

And I would have liked more about linking with Fake Philip K. Dick. The leads were good. Do I want to see more of these? Not really.
 
Bird Box - It felt like two derivative movies wrapped up in one. Night of the Living Dead with all the house crap and them trying to get to Haven. I want to say the NOTLD segment was more interesting, but it also felt like there wasn't much to the getting to Haven so it's unfair to make the comparison. If they had more set pieces surrounding that, maybe? I was mostly bored with it. I could talk about some of the stuff that irritated me, like the five year jump. I would have been more interested in that time because their resources would have dwindled significantly during that period, but they didn't. How they didn't seem to protect the house at all during that time. How we never learn what happens at night - or maybe we did and I nodded off during it. Regardless, most of this seems to happen during the day. Or how fucking irritating Lady Cartman was. But it's not worth the effort.

Roma - I did not hate it nearly as much as you did. I mean, I didn't hate it at all, whereas you seem to despise it with a passion. But whether I actually liked it is another question. There are movies that you and @Stormrider666 watch and you're like "I can see why people call it a classic." "Did you like it?" "Well, I can see why people call it a classic." That's how I felt with this. I thought it looked great and probably the winner for Cinematography, but anything beyond that? No. I don't know if this is going to make sense, but it's a movie that feels exactly like the type of movie that it wants to be and the type of movie it is. But can I say I felt anything while watching it? Maybe I need to see it a second time.
Bird Box reminded me of The Happening but better and the acting wasn't laughable entertainingly bad. The monster from Lost and elements of A Quiet Place. A Quiet Place was the superior movie.
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
Roma - I did not hate it nearly as much as you did. I mean, I didn't hate it at all, whereas you seem to despise it with a passion. But whether I actually liked it is another question. There are movies that you and @Stormrider666 watch and you're like "I can see why people call it a classic." "Did you like it?" "Well, I can see why people call it a classic." That's how I felt with this. I thought it looked great and probably the winner for Cinematography, but anything beyond that? No. I don't know if this is going to make sense, but it's a movie that feels exactly like the type of movie that it wants to be and the type of movie it is. But can I say I felt anything while watching it?
I didn't hate it so much as I was disappointed that yet another movie that's getting universal praise turns out to be a plodding slice-of-life drag. I felt exactly the same after watching this as I did The 400 Blows. They both even wrap up with a beach scene. I'm just looking around my empty living room, like "That's...it?" This kind of stuff is really out of my wheelhouse. When I see a movie described as sumptuous or enthralling I should just pass. I get that I'm missing empathy or whatever it is that allows me to appreciate them.

Maybe I need to see it a second time.
If I watched it again, it would be the count the number of panning shots following the maid through mild chaos - the cinematic equivalent of the dotted line tracking Jeffy through a color Family Circus panel. The only thing I can say I enjoyed was when Missus came home with a smaller car.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
I didn't hate it so much as I was disappointed that yet another movie that's getting universal praise turns out to be a plodding slice-of-life drag. I felt exactly the same after watching this as I did The 400 Blows. They both even wrap up with a beach scene. I'm just looking around my empty living room, like "That's...it?" This kind of stuff is really out of my wheelhouse. When I see a movie described as sumptuous or enthralling I should just pass. I get that I'm missing empathy or whatever it is that allows me to appreciate them.



If I watched it again, it would be the count the number of panning shots following the maid through mild chaos - the cinematic equivalent of the dotted line tracking Jeffy through a color Family Circus panel. The only thing I can say I enjoyed was when Missus came home with a smaller car.
I liked when they showed the maid her dead baby and it felt like a Monty Python routine.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
I didn't hate it so much as I was disappointed that yet another movie that's getting universal praise turns out to be a plodding slice-of-life drag. I felt exactly the same after watching this as I did The 400 Blows. They both even wrap up with a beach scene. I'm just looking around my empty living room, like "That's...it?" This kind of stuff is really out of my wheelhouse. When I see a movie described as sumptuous or enthralling I should just pass. I get that I'm missing empathy or whatever it is that allows me to appreciate them.



If I watched it again, it would be the count the number of panning shots following the maid through mild chaos - the cinematic equivalent of the dotted line tracking Jeffy through a color Family Circus panel. The only thing I can say I enjoyed was when Missus came home with a smaller car.
I wouldn't necessarily call it a lack of empathy. At least from me. Because The Florida Project is a slice of life movie and I can't sing its praises highly enough.

And I wouldn't call it a lack of film sophistication because we watch a fuckton of movies spanning all genres and eras. It's not like we're a @Pigdango who ranks Infinity War above the Mona Lisa but above David as far as man's greatest artistic achievements. (I'm kidding, I'm kidding. I know you put it above David.)

But it feels that to truly appreciate Roma, you need to discuss it in stuff film theorist voice. "Harumph, if you notice the mise en scene of when they're standing outside the cinema, you'll recognize..."

Maybe it's edge. Maybe what we're looking for in movies is some edginess - not in a shock jock way - but a bit of grit and darkness. Whether it's in the narrative, the look, or a character that's a bit unexpected. None of the characters in Roma had that bit of pizazz. But if a character had pizazz it might not have felt right in the movie? And this movie does everything right to the point where it's missing something. It's a similar problem I had with Call Me By Your Name. It did everything right for the movie it was, but it just didn't connect with me. (Though I like it more thinking back on it.)

I can't imagine that we're the only people who feel that way, but that's not a flaw in the movie, it's a personal preference. So I think a lot of the praise comes less because people emotionally connected with it, and more because it accomplished what it set out to accomplish quite well. And you don't want to be the asshole who picks Escape Room over Roma.
 

Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
Donator
I wouldn't necessarily call it a lack of empathy. At least from me. Because The Florida Project is a slice of life movie and I can't sing its praises highly enough.
I guess I need to finally watch that. Fuckin' Sandy Kane.

But it feels that to truly appreciate Roma, you need to discuss it in stuff film theorist voice. "Harumph, if you notice the mise en scene of when they're standing outside the cinema, you'll recognize..."
That's another similarity with The 400 Blows. This is an exact commentary quote from a random scene: "After he's been found out in his lies and publicly chastised, we see Antoine descending the angle of the staircase from upper left to lower right. Students of visual literacy recognize in this movement a parallel to a graph of declining fortunes, reinforcing Antoine's descent in moral as well as physical terms." My brain doesn't work like that, and there has to be some significant appeal to the movie to begin with before you ever get to breaking down scenes like that.

Maybe it's edge. Maybe what we're looking for in movies is some edginess - not in a shock jock way - but a bit of grit and darkness. Whether it's in the narrative, the look, or a character that's a bit unexpected.
That's fair, and those are the kinds of movies I'm drawn to, but I also thoroughly enjoyed Gifted and Akeelah and the Bee.

None of the characters in Roma had that bit of pizazz. But if a character had pizazz it might not have felt right in the movie? And this movie does everything right to the point where it's missing something. It's a similar problem I had with Call Me By Your Name. It did everything right for the movie it was, but it just didn't connect with me. (Though I like it more thinking back on it.)
Swingin' Dick Soldier Boy had pizzazz. If the protests were explained, I missed it. But yeah, I think that's it. I didn't care about anyone or anything in Roma. And that's not me being unable to care about "those people." I thought City of God was amazing. In Roma's case, "those people" were too mundane. Was that the point - in contrast to the turmoil around them?

I can't imagine that we're the only people who feel that way, but that's not a flaw in the movie, it's a personal preference. So I think a lot of the praise comes less because people emotionally connected with it, and more because it accomplished what it set out to accomplish quite well. And you don't want to be the asshole who picks Escape Room over Roma.
I don't even know what it accomplished aside from getting two less-than-enthusiastic viewers talking about it.
 
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