Leander Police Officer, Shoots Service Dog While Serving Warrant At Wrong House

Dec 8, 2004
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#1


Vinny in his bandages.

A police officer in Texas is under review for firing a bullet into the back of a 3-year-old trained therapy dog.

“This dog wasn't after him. This dog was just running up going, 'Hey what are you doing?' and they have a right to do that. This is my yard; this man should not have even been there. He could have killed my husband's best friend,” homeowner Renata Simmons told KVUE.

Leander police officer Woodson Blase claims that he was walking down the sidewalk Monday when the Simmons' two German shepherds charged at him, MyFoxAustin reports. The officer fired three bullets, wounding a male German Shepherd, Vinny.

To make matters worse, Blase was serving a traffic warrant at the wrong address when he encountered the dog.
KVUE explains:

The Simmons also tell KVUE they have never heard of the man police were looking for. The warrant was for a man named Bradly Neal Simpson, who is wanted for an expired vehicle registration.​
The address on the warrant is in Cedar Park, not Liberty Hill, where the Simmons have lived for nine years. However, Leander police say their database shows Simpson’s last known address as the same one where the Simmons live.
Simmons, a dog trainer for more than 30 years, says she and her family hope that Blase is fired for the attack. The officer remains on active duty, according to the Associated Press.

The case is under administrative review.
Link
Poor doggie... shooka... shooka...
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
22,541
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#2
This cop shooting a nice doggie was already posted Friday.

Police shooting of pet German shepherd sparks outrage by El Monte family (Video)

Home security video supports claim of owners on Maxson Road
By Brian Day, Staff Writer@SGVCrime on Twitter
Posted: 06/21/2013 11:06:15 AM PDT
Updated: 06/21/2013 06:09:08 PM PDT



EL MONTE - A family expressed outrage Friday after an El Monte police officer shot their pet 2-year-old German Shepherd inside their fenced-in front yard while following up on a report of a runaway teenager. The family was forced to put the dog down following the shooting.
"I'm hurt that they would do this to my pet, but at the same time I'm angry because they act like they don't even care. They didn't apologize," Luu said through a Vietnamese translator.
In an encounter recorded by a home security camera shortly after 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, two police officers arrived at the home of Cathy Luu, her husband Chi Nguyen and their children in the 4700 block of Maxson Road.
The officers had an appointment to meet with Luu and Nguyen

Kiki, a 2-year-old German shepherd, lies wounded after being shot by an El Monte police officer following up on a report of a runaway teen in the 4700 block of Maxson Road in El Monte on Wednesday, June 19, 2013. The dog ultimately had to be euthanized (Courtesy)
about 3:30 p.m. to discuss their teenage son, who had apparently run away from home over the weekend, and pick up a photograph, according to El Monte police officials and the dog owners. But the investigators were delayed and ended up arriving about 4:30 p.m.
Police and the family gave conflicting reports of the events leading up to the shooting.
Police said the officers shook the gate and otherwise took care to check if there were dogs present in the yard before opening the gate and entering. But a video captured by the family's home security camera appears to support Luu's claim that the officers simply parked their patrol car and entered the yard without checking for dogs, despite two posted "beware of dog" signs, including one mounted to the gate itself.
After being shot, the wounded dog ran to the backyard of the home. It was later euthanized at a veterinary hospital.
The loss of the female German Shepherd, named Kiki, devastated the family, Luu said, especially the couple's 11-year-old son.
"She was his baby," the mother son. "He cried all night. He still cries."
In addition to the death of the dog, family members said they were concerned about the safety of an officer firing a gun in a neighborhood crowded with children.
There were four children present at the home when the shooting occurred, and a children's pool party was taking place in a front yard across the street, according to the family and the video.
"What if my son ran outside behind the dog?" Luu said. "When I think about it, it's scary."
Police were conducting an internal investigation into the shooting, El Monte police Capt. Dan Buehler said.
Police did not name the officer who shot the dog, however the family identified her as Officer A. Castillo. The officer could not be reached for comment Friday.
"From reviewing the report, it's my opinion that the officer followed policy," he said.
"They did go up to the front (gate)," the captain said. "There was a beware of dog sign of the gate. They did what we always do as police officers. They shook the gate. They didn't see any dogs."
"They looked for any signs of dogs - chew toys, dog mess, what have you," Buehler said, adding that they entered the yard after not seeing anything indicating a dog was present.
"They walked up to the porch. They rang the doorbell. They knocked on the door. That's when the first dog came around the house," he said.
One of the officers is seen on the video petting the pit bull before returning to the gate, which had been left open by the officers, and closing it. The male officer was outside the closed gate when the second officer, a female, was confronted by the German shepherd.
"Then the German shepherd came from behind the house," Buehler said. "The German shepherd came up. It was much more aggressive than the pit bull. It was growling, it was barking."
The (female) officer remained on the porch and continued knocking on the front door with her foot as the German shepherd charged toward her, he said.
"As the dog got to about three feet of this officer, this officer had no other choice than to fire a round," Buehler said.
The dog was struck in the side.
The video, however, depicts the officers walking up to the gate, opening it and entering, seemingly without breaking stride.
Luu said she asked the officer why she shot the dog, and why they officers simply entered the yard without calling on the phone.
Luu said the officer responded that she did not see the "beware of dog" signs, and that she did try to reach the family by phone, though Luu said she received no such phone call...............


Cathy Luu of El Monte stands on Friday, June 21, 2013, near a "beware of dog" sign on a gate police officers passed through while following up on a runaway teen investigation before shooting her 2-year-old German shepherd in the 4700 block of Maxson Road in El Monte on Wednesday, June 19, 2013. (Staff photo by Brian Day)
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http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci_23511786/el-monte-family-outraged-over-police-shooting-pet
Oh wait, that was the wrong article from Friday...

by indieregister | June 21, 2013 · 2:04 am
↓ Jump to Comments
Carteret deputy tases tied dog

By William R. Toler
When Rebecka Brown returned home June 5, she noticed a business card stuck in her door.

That card was from Det. Joey Cooper, a deputy with the Carteret County Sheriff’s Office.
“Naturally I called the number immediately to find out why an officer had been here,” she wrote on a Facebook page.
Det. Cooper told her he was there to serve a warrant to her husband for failure to appear in court in relation to a ticket he had received while hunting. She also found out something horrifying.
“He then told me he had to tase my dog.”
When she asked why, Brown says Det. Cooper told her that Merlin, the family’s year-old lab/boxer mix, had attacked him. “I asked him if he was okay… I was in complete shock! He said he was fine, not so much as a scratch on him.”
[Note: Merlin was attached to a 10' lead in the backyard, not roaming freely.]
“He instructed me that the taser did not shock Merlin because only one prong made a connection with him,” she said adding that Det. Cooper told her how to remove the prong. When the call ended, she went to check on her wounded pup. “Merlin wouldn’t let me near him. I could see the prong protruding from his back but but he just cowered and whined,” she said.
After several attempts to coax Merlin over so she could remove the prong, she noticed something strange about his eye. “There was a little blood under the lid of his right eye and the eyeball itself resembled an old rubber party balloon.” After she and a friend removed the prong she noticed his eyeball was ripped open.
Brown said she immediately called Det. Cooper back but got his voicemail. She then called the Sheriff’s Office to report her dog’s injuries. An hour later, she says two deputies showed up to investigate.

“They asked to see Merlin, so I took them inside to him,” she said. “As soon as he saw them, he cowered to the side, wimpered, and started to visibly shake. The deputy took a step towards him and Merlin started to growl. He was responding to the uniform… I informed the deputy that this is not his normal behavior and that he is responding out of fear. A uniform, just like theirs, had seriously injured him…. he was afraid of another round with that uniform!”
She believes the eye injury was caused by either a flashlight or a nightstick...............


http://indieregister.com/2608/news/carteret-deputy-tases-tied-dog/
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
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#5
Imagine how many dogs would be dead if we had armed postal mail carriers?
 

Hudson

Supreme Champion!!!!!
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Jan 14, 2002
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#6
I have been on calls where some of the officers (usually younger ones) completely freak out when there is a dog is there....on a routine wellness check where a woman had a little too much to drink and drunk dialed a friend...she had a young, very friendly Golden that wanted to check out who the new people in the house were...the one officer next to me freaked out when the dog ran over to make friends and he pulled his gun. I yelled at the officer to relax..that he (the dog) wants to make friends and knelt down to the dog's level and started petting the dog. Owner (upset) asked the officer to leave the house to which the other, more seasoned officer agreed and sent young buck out of the house. I occupied the pup...maybe a year old, along with the other officer...while my partner checked out the patient..who refused care... The Older officer was there for another 45 min trying to smooth things over with the owner/patient.
I know....
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
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#7
Lucky you weren't shot while shielding the terrorist.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#9
When my chick was a health inspector she got bit in the crotch by a pitbull... so her boss said next inspection take the dog officer with her. Next inspection comes up, they say they have a dog... and when they turned up it was a Chihuahua.

Again...

I know....
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
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#10
The loss of the female German Shepherd, named Kiki, devastated the family, Luu said, especially the couple's 11-year-old son.
"She was his baby," the mother son. "He cried all night. He still cries."
[Ant voice]JEEEEZUS CHRIST....[/Ant voice]
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
10,309
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#15
This keeps coming up over and over again. The standard is simple: do you feel you are in danger?

Then the shoot is justified. It's justified in the Zimmerman case, it's justified in the FBI/mistaken identity case that's being trolled about in the Boston Bombing thread right now, and it's justified in this story.

It sucks when it hurts an innocent. But that's the rule. If you feel you are in danger, you can defend yourself.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
54,246
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#16
This keeps coming up over and over again. The standard is simple: do you feel you are in danger?
Here's a more important question: how hard is it for a (presumably) literate adult male to check a fucking address?
 

steve500

Registered User
Oct 20, 2008
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#17
This keeps coming up over and over again. The standard is simple: do you feel you are in danger?

Then the shoot is justified. It's justified in the Zimmerman case, it's justified in the FBI/mistaken identity case that's being trolled about in the Boston Bombing thread right now, and it's justified in this story.

It sucks when it hurts an innocent. But that's the rule. If you feel you are in danger, you can defend yourself.
The thing is the cops ignored the beware of dogs sign, and also lied about shaking the fence, which I'm assuming is protocol?
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
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#18
Having been paid to trespass on 1,000's of property's (survey inspections for title insurance) I've only been nipped once by a doggie.

First step is to find the property in question. The mailbox is usually the first place to look, followed by looking at the front door. Next, always knock on the front door and speak with anyone home. If nobody answers the door, I'll stroll around to a side gate.

Whistling will stir most dogs from their slumber. If no dogs come to the gate, I'll open it up and walk on through and complete the survey inspection (with diagrams/notes for any changes to it.)

I've only had a handful of times when dogs have not responded to the whistle. One was a dobbie with its voice box cut out (drug dealer dog) that lunged at me. Good thing he was connected to a wire and nearly choked himself to death trying to get me.

Another time was a huge rottie (about 125#s) that awoke from his slumber and charged me. I didn't run, I just put my hand up and he stopped right in from of me. Petted him and made my exit.

No dawgs were harmed.
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,445
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Maine
#19
Having been paid to trespass on 1,000's of property's (survey inspections for title insurance) I've only been nipped once by a doggie.

First step is to find the property in question. The mailbox is usually the first place to look, followed by looking at the front door. Next, always knock on the front door and speak with anyone home. If nobody answers the door, I'll stroll around to a side gate.

Whistling will stir most dogs from their slumber. If no dogs come to the gate, I'll open it up and walk on through and complete the survey inspection (with diagrams/notes for any changes to it.)

I've only had a handful of times when dogs have not responded to the whistle. One was a dobbie with its voice box cut out (drug dealer dog) that lunged at me. Good thing he was connected to a wire and nearly choked himself to death trying to get me.

Another time was a huge rottie (about 125#s) that awoke from his slumber and charged me. I didn't run, I just put my hand up and he stopped right in from of me. Petted him and made my exit.

No dawgs were harmed.
Pretty much if you don't show fear you are pretty much ok... went to the liquor store parked beside a truck with a huge GSD... who was loosing his shit barking at me. Just went hi buddy... he did a head tilt and I patted his head and all was fine.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
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#20
Pretty much if you don't show fear you are pretty much ok... went to the liquor store parked beside a truck with a huge GSD... who was loosing his shit barking at me. Just went hi buddy... he did a head tilt and I patted his head and all was fine.
Exactly. Wish they showed these 'cops' how to treat peoples pets. Cesar Millan's show would be a good starting point.
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,445
21,269
693
Maine
#21
Exactly. Wish they showed these 'cops' how to treat peoples pets. Cesar Millan's show would be a good starting point.
Yep a little training on dog behavior would be a good idea... like I have mentioned before dogs pick up on fear... and see that as a threat.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
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#22
And the smaller the dog, the louder they bark. Even though they're one second from flying from a boot kick.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#23
That's one of the reasons we had to move the bedroom downstairs due to the 3 or 4 barking machines next door that are on a 4 hour rotation 24/7...
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#24
When my chick was a health inspector she got bit in the crotch by a pitbull... so her boss said next inspection take the dog officer with her. Next inspection comes up, they say they have a dog... and when they turned up it was a Chihuahua.
He bit me in my vagina.