Looking for a new TV all this new stuff is confusing

Turfmower

Registered User
Jan 17, 2005
578
#1
I'm looking for a 32 inch set to replace my old 27" Proscan. Looking at both the Samsung LN-T3253H or Sony KDL-32XBR4 They both are TFT active matrix, 1366 x 768, 720p, 8000:1 contrast. The Samsung is $900 and Sony is $1200. Is Sony a better set or are you just paying for the name? Which is the better set or is there a better brand? Is the extended warranty worth buying?

I called my cable company and they said I need a HD converter box but it doesn't use HDMI cable the have different type that the supply. My DVD player is progressive scan and uses Component cables or svideo which one is better? I have just one RCA on my current TV. What cables do I need?
 
Apr 22, 2005
261
#2
www.avsforum.com is very helpful.

The samsung has 3 HDMI where the sony has 2. I'd go to a store and try to see them both side by side. They both seem like nice sets.

Component is better than SVideo but bulky. HDMI gives the best picture and carries audio in the same small wire.

I'd invest in an extended warranty for that kinda investment.
 

Davel23

Registered User
Feb 26, 2005
286
#3
Component will get you progressive-scan, assuming your DVD player supports it. Of course, DVD only displays 480 lines regardless of i or p.
 

click

Registered User
Jan 5, 2005
558
#4
Don't mean to hijack, I'm looking for new tv too. I've read a lot of stuff online. Is the 720p or 1080 what I should be looking for? The 720's seem much cheaper. Should I give a shit?
 
Apr 22, 2005
261
#5
I don't think the savings is worth it if you have HDTV and/or HD DVD's
 

NikkorTheMonk

Registered User
Apr 26, 2005
473
#6
Don't buy anything till after Christmas, or the Superbowl. Do your research, read Consumer Reports, know your stuff. But if you wait till aftre those dates you will find the most insane deals on a TV. We waited till after the Superbowl last year to buy a TV, we had a 42in TV all picked out and ready to buy and we went in not even thinking about returned items, walked out with the Samsung 50" DLP with three year warrenty for less $300 then the exact same 42" Samsung version with no warrenty. As with all electronic when you have the cash set aside to buy it you want it now. Just hold on man, theres a killer deal headed your way if you wait
 

thelord68

There's always time for lubricant
Feb 24, 2003
0
#7
1080p > 1080i >720p > 720i > 480p > 480i

Get the best resolution you can reasonably afford. Though given how cheap the smaller LCDs are (a little over $500 for the 32" Vizio), you may want to go for 720p now and replace it sooner when new technologies hit the market (LED backlighting, OLED, etc.) The difference between standard-def and 720 is such a leap anyway that you'll be happy without springing for the 1080 set.

The other factor is getting the right screen size for the room. If you get too small a screen for the distance, you'll be too far away to get the benefit from the hi-def. Too big a screen and you'll have to move your head to see the whole screen.

Here's a good link: http://www.cnet.com/4520-7874_1-5108580-2.html

A lot of programming is still only 720, though upscaled to 1080.

As far as brands, Samsung is #1 right now, with Vizio is #2 in sales. Samsung makes a lot of the panels that other manufacturers use in their sets. Sony is definitely riding on their name recognition, though quality is not what it used to be.

I was reading an article in the last couple of days that said flat-panels are much more reliable than standard TVs and DLP. And even when they do break, the cost of the repair is cheaper than the cost of the extended warranty. So don't waste the money.

HDMI > Component > S-video > Composite

Most of the cable companies give you component cables with the HD box. All the ones I've seen have HDMI outputs, but you have to buy the cable yourself. About HDMI cables, EXPENSIVE ISN'T BETTER! The cable is carrying digital information, so there is no degradation over distance. Either the signal gets there or it doesn't. You can get a $10 cable that will get the signal to the set just as well as a $100 cable. Don't be tricked into spending money on HDMI cables. HDMI cables carry the picture and audio, so its a simpler hookup. It looks like a USB cable.

As far as the DVD player goes, if you are going to spring for a HD set, spend another $50-$75 and get an upscaling DVD player with HDMI. This will make standard-def DVDs look better on a HD set. While not truly HD, the upscaling reformats the picture to fit the dimensions of the screen.
 
Feb 20, 2007
141
#8
Don't buy anything till after Christmas, or the Superbowl. Do your research, read Consumer Reports, know your stuff. But if you wait till aftre those dates you will find the most insane deals on a TV. We waited till after the Superbowl last year to buy a TV, we had a 42in TV all picked out and ready to buy and we went in not even thinking about returned items, walked out with the Samsung 50" DLP with three year warrenty for less $300 then the exact same 42" Samsung version with no warrenty. As with all electronic when you have the cash set aside to buy it you want it now. Just hold on man, theres a killer deal headed your way if you wait
:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

YOu are the best - I totally agree with your post. Wait until the deals are out, especially on those events and do your research. I got my tv for a great damn price with the superbowl savings, plus I did the research on it and read the reviews.
 
Jun 30, 2005
681
#9
if you have the patience to wait for delivery and don't live in NY I suggest ordering it online...It is tax free! Amazon.com is great as are most of their affiliated e-tailers
 

Max Johnson

Registered User
Oct 14, 2004
0
#10
I saved a ton of cash on a 52" Panasonic a few years back using some Thanksgiving deals. Actually was the Wed before rather than the Friday after.
 
Feb 5, 2003
753
#11
Get a black and white Zenith and watch "The Brady Bunch."

lingerrr longerrrr
 
Jul 13, 2006
0
#12
1080p > 1080i >720p > 720i > 480p > 480i

Get the best resolution you can reasonably afford. Though given how cheap the smaller LCDs are (a little over $500 for the 32" Vizio), you may want to go for 720p now and replace it sooner when new technologies hit the market (LED backlighting, OLED, etc.) The difference between standard-def and 720 is such a leap anyway that you'll be happy without springing for the 1080 set.
I agree. LCDs are basically burn-free now, unlike plasmas. And you're not going to get a 1080p(1920×1080) display unless you get 42" and higher sized screens. Alot of the 42'' are even 720p(1280x720) native that also output 1080i (not the same resolution as 1080p). Programming isn't broadcast in 1080p anyway. It will either be 720p or 1080i.

About the only place you will run into 1080p right now is with Blu-Ray discs and also with HD-DVD(less popular HD movie format) and with some video games.

OK, to make it simple, here is the outline. Standard TV(NTSC) is 480 pixels at 24/30fps. High definition TV(ATSC) is broken into three sections with different capabilites. 720p capable of fps of 24(film), 30(TV), and 60(TV). 1080i is capable of 24, 30, and 60. 1080p is capable of 24 and 30fps.

So, as you can see there really isn't a reason to go out and buy a 1080p capable TV until they tweak the format to run at higher fps. Because you're simply going to be watching 1080i TV on your set anyway if you're watching games and stuff. The 1080p offers higher definition with things like Blu-Ray discs than a 1080i display, but there isn't a way to watch 1080i programming as 1080p because the original signal has less resolution.

The long and short of it is, buy a cheaper TV until they come out with Organic-LED sets that hopefully will offer better 1080p displays along with their touted 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio.

Oh and one more thing. Incase you're not sure what the "p" and the "i" stand for then they are for "Progressive Scan" and for "Interlaced Scan." Progressive is the image scanned in from top to bottom line by line in order and the image doesn't go away until the last scan line is projected to form the entire image. Interlaced scanning is where each frame is split in half where odd and even scan lines(fields) are interlaced with the following frame. So, after the 2nd half of the image it scanned onto the screen the 1st half of the screen has started posting the image of the next frame. That helps to keep flickering down that can occur depending on the pace of the footage being displayed. You're brain can't tell anyway :) Kind of like when you watch a film at a theater you can't see the black frames in between what's being shown on the screen. The brain is slow.
 
Jun 2, 2005
0
#13
Don't buy anything till after Christmas, or the Superbowl. Do your research, read Consumer Reports, know your stuff. But if you wait till aftre those dates you will find the most insane deals on a TV. We waited till after the Superbowl last year to buy a TV, we had a 42in TV all picked out and ready to buy and we went in not even thinking about returned items, walked out with the Samsung 50" DLP with three year warrenty for less $300 then the exact same 42" Samsung version with no warrenty. As with all electronic when you have the cash set aside to buy it you want it now. Just hold on man, theres a killer deal headed your way if you wait
Yep. I bought a 65" Samsung HD about 5 years ago (It's not a flat panel, it's a free standing TV that stands about 3.5 - 4 ft tall) for around $1200 right after the Super Bowl. I don't know if it's 10 million J or 780L but I plugged my XBox and HD Cable into it and it looks big, clear, and bad ass.

I love my TV, and it was cheaper than most TV's I've seen with screens <75% it's size.