Metallica In Playboy (April 2001)

Status
Not open for further replies.

FOFOLINA

Registered User
#1
<FONT COLOR="Red">HETFIELD: "I'm definitely not the smartest guy in the band, so winning an intellectual argument is not going to happen. Resorting to violence used to work." </FONT c>

<FONT COLOR="Orange">NEWSTED: "Five years ago, the band took priority over all other things. Now, families come first. I understand that -- but I'm the only one who's not married." </FONT c>

<FONT COLOR="Navy">HAMMETT: "Criticism is something that we've always dealt with. Even our fans fucking criticize us. We have bulletproof vests on. To tell the truth, we feed off of it." </FONT c>

<FONT COLOR="Blue">ULRICH: "We all had some pretty slutty moments. I don't think there's anybody in this band who hasn't had crabs a couple of times or the occasional drip-dick." </FONT c>

Even when Metallica's quiet, they manage to make noise. On a mid-January morning, in the middle of the longest respite from touring and recording the band had ever taken, Metallica issued a terse but emotional press release, in which bassist Jason Newsted announced his departure from the group because of "private and personal reasons and the physical damage I have done to myself over the years." A few hours later, a source close to Metallica told Playboy that Newsted's decision had capped a nine-and-a-half-hour band meeting the day before at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in San Francisco, the sequel to a similar marathon caucus a week earlier. Newsted's resignation, the source said, had been "very well discussed" by the band. In some ways, it was just the usual tumult for Metallica, who spent much of last year waging an assault -- or, they might say, a counteroffensive -- against Napster. The website drew an estimated 38 million users in its first 18 months by allowing fans to trade sound files without paying any tariff; in short, by providing free music. Metallica sued for alleged copyright infringement and racketeering, and on July 11, drummer Lars Ulrich -- whose press campaign against Napster was full of typical bravado -- testified against the website before the U.S. Senate. Between politicking and press conferences, Metallica played music, too. I Disappear, a new song on the Mission Impossible: 2 soundtrack, was nominated for five MTV Video Music Awards. The band released S&M, a two-disc concert album recorded with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. They toured during the summer with Kid Rock, who handled some lead vocals when singer James Hetfield missed three shows because of a Jet Ski accident. Even VH1 embraced these one-time scourges, profiling the band in a particularly bloody Behind the Music. The year 2000, says bassist Jason Newsted, "was possibly the highest-profile year for Metallica ever." We sent freelance writer Rob Tannenbaum to interview the last of the big rock bands. He found that although the band members were out of touch with one another during the hiatus, they were not out of one another's minds. His report:


"I wasn't surprised that Jason Newsted quit Metallica. Just two months earlier, I'd spent a day with each of the four, and I've never seen a band so quarrelsome and fractious. Most of the barbs were cloaked in humor -- Newsted mocked Hetfield's singing, Hetfield mocked Ulrich's drumming, and Ulrich, whom I interviewed last, responded to several of Hetfield's quotes with scorn. "But genuine tension was evident in these interviews -- the last ever to be conducted with this Metallica lineup -- because they shared one trait: Each talked about his need for solitude. Paradoxically, this is a band of loners, and the conflict between unity and individuality was pretty clear.

" PLAYBOY: Aside from his natural garrulousness, why did Lars become the band's spokesman against Napster?


HETFIELD: My wife and I were giving birth to a second child [son Castor, born May 2000]. And family is number one. So Lars had to run with the torch, and there were a few bad moves. You know, Lars can get really mouthy and be a snotty-nosed kid at times. I cringed at certain interviews: "Oh dude, don't say that


." ULRICH: I said some things that were borderline silly. When Limp Bizkit embraced Napster and took $2 million to play this "free tour" -- it is possible to play free shows without taking sponsorship money, because we do that -- I said it was total bullshit. I know a lot of people hate Fred Durst, but I think he's really fucking talented. Me and Fred kissed and made up. When I open my mouth, most of the time something somewhat eloquent comes out, and once in a while I talk a bunch of fucking bullshit. I'm aware of that.

PLAYBOY: What sort of things did the fans say to your face?


HETFIELD: Some fans said, "Leave Napster alone, dude" -- if they were suicidal [laughs]. But that was after "Metallica rocks, dude." So you would turn your "thanks" into a "fuck you." I've gotten into plenty of arguments with fans who just wanted to "discuss" it. This poor girl in Atlanta, I made her cry. She felt money was evil. Why don't you go live in Canada or some socialist country?


ULRICH: If you'd stop being a Metallica fan because I won't give you my music for free, then fuck you. I don 't want you to be a Metallica fan.



HAMMETT: I'm still shocked at the reaction people have. I thought it was so obvious: People are taking our music when they're not supposed to, and we want to stop them. Computers make it seem like you're not stealing, because all you're doing is pressing a button. The bottom line is, stealing is not right.

PLAYBOY: You guys pissed off a lot of people. On the Metallica Usenet group, there's an ongoing thread called "Kirk and Lars are gay


HAMMETT: That just shows a total lack of creative juices. That's like calling someone "fatso."

." PLAYBOY: Maybe you were right on the merits. But it's hard for people to sympathize with the rich.


ULRICH: Yeah, it is. So it becomes about "these greedy rock stars." But understand, 80 million records later, I don't know what the fuck to do with all the money I have. So now can we talk about what the real issue is? The real issue, for me, is choice. I want to choose what happens to my music. It's pretty clear that the future is selling your music online. But common sense will tell you that you cannot do that if the guy next door is giving it away for free.



<FONT COLOR="Green">There you go people this is what Metallica has to say in Playboy.....</FONT c>

------------------
"Always Keep Your Mouth
Shut And Never Rat On Your Friends.
F-ING TOOL HEAD ASS C
Just Say No To Marrige
 
#2
Yeah i heard about this on the O&A show yesterday. Friggin James didnt want Jason to release his solo material thats why Jason left i knew there was a good reason. Fucking James and Lars make the perfect couple.
 

FOFOLINA

Registered User
#3
I don't even know what to say about this....
the whole group has lost it<IMG SRC="http://www.wackbag.com/ubb/smilies/cwm14.gif" border=0>

------------------
"Always Keep Your Mouth
Shut And Never Rat On Your Friends.
F-ING TOOL HEAD ASS C
Just Say No To Marrige
 
#4
One thing only left to say fuck them personally i think it all started to go down hill after the LOAD album.
 

FOFOLINA

Registered User
#5
Yup I so agree with that They are sell outs


------------------
"Always Keep Your Mouth
Shut And Never Rat On Your Friends.
F-ING TOOL HEAD ASS C
Just Say No To Marrige
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top