Missing soldier in Texas found dead

mascan42

Registered User
#1
Hmm . . . this sounds awfully suspicious.


Soldier who died in Texas was dehydrated
By JIM VERTUNO, Associated Press Writer
42 minutes ago

FORT HOOD, Texas - A soldier who went missing for four days after a solo navigation exercise died of hyperthermia and dehydration, according to autopsy results released Wednesday.

The body of Sgt. Lawrence G. Sprader, 25, was found Tuesday night in a brushy area on the Central Texas Army post's training ground, said Eddy Howton, Fort Hood's director of emergency services. About 3,000 people, including soldiers, covered more than 30 square miles searching for him in 90-degree heat.

A brief report on the autopsy, conducted at the Southwestern Institute of Forensics Sciences at Dallas, was released by a Bell County justice of the peace. The report did not provide further details.

Officials have said Sprader had two canteens of water, a water backpack and two Meals Ready To Eat when he left. His body was found near plenty of drinking water from creeks and other sources, said Robert Volk, Fort Hood's chief game warden.

Officials do not suspect foul play, said Lt. Col. Carter Oates, commander of the 11th MP Battalion, Criminal Investigations Division, where Sprader was assigned.

Sprader disappeared Friday during the exercise testing basic map-reading and navigation skills in a rugged exercise area at the sprawling central Texas post.

Officials declined to answer questions about whether there were signs of distress that might indicate how Sprader died, saying all that is under investigation. Eddy Howton, Fort Hood's director of emergency services, said he did not know if searchers found anything that would indicate how long Sprader had been dead.

Commanders said that when they reached Sprader on his phone late Friday — the last time anyone spoke to him — he was determined to finish the exercise and did not indicate he was ill or distressed.

"He was a model soldier. He had a goal to succeed," Oates said.

Sprader was one of nearly 320 noncommissioned officers taking part in a two-week leadership course. Nine other soldiers got lost during the three-hour exercise, but all except Sprader got back to the rally point safely by following the sound of a siren that blasts when time is up, said Col. Diane Battaglia, a III Corps spokeswoman at Fort Hood.

Post officials said no other soldier had ever been lost on the heavily used range long enough to prompt such a huge search.

Sprader had returned from an Iraq deployment in September and worked in the criminal investigation division of Fort Hood. The Prince George, Va., soldier had no orders for redeployment to the war zone.
 

lucky

Shoot the speakers
#2
I was stationed at Ft. Hood and even did a map navigation course there and it is a huge sprawling place that is easy to get lost but it seems strange to me also for some reason.
 

highway23

I miss NY wings
#3
With the training that these guys have, I find it highly impossible for them...not to get lost, but to be so dumb to not find a way to survive.

4 days?

Something is up...because lil' kids can survive longer...without the survival training.

I'm not pretending to know exactly what this guy knew, but he had to know more than me. And I'm pretty sure I could survive 4 days..especially with what he had
 

lucky

Shoot the speakers
#4
One of the main things that puzzled me was he was an NCO. It means he had to have done the basic map navigation thing before and passed it.
 

Budyzir

There's nothing quite like a shorn scrotum.
#5
A preexisting condition maybe?
 

ern

Hiding behind my keyboard
#6
I was in a long range surveillance unit, and back then regular army guys generally sucked at land navigation. when I went to PLDC I had to show the instructor where we were on the map, not becuase he was testing me, but because the whole squad was lost. We were only about a 200m from a hardball road at the time.

He may have thought this wouldn't last that long and killed his canteens early so he wouldn't have to lug around the weight. Ive seen plenty of guys do that on land nav courses before. Not to mention that anyone who has done several of these has seen the hapless groups of people waiting around for someone to give them a clue as to where they are.

I wasn't there, I am speculating like everyone else.
 

LiddyRules

Signed To a Non-Exclusive Consultancy
#8
Didn't this happen to the kid in A Few Good Men?
 
#9
A soldier who went missing for four days after a solo navigation exercise died of hyperthermia and dehydration, according to autopsy results released Wednesday.
How in the fuck did he die from hypothermia in Texas during the Summer? It's fucking June, not Febuary.

I don't see how you can get lost on a military base. In ROTC we ran all around military bases and through swamps during field orientation training and competitions. It's very hard to get lost after being trained in land navigation.

Either he was kind of "slow" or something happened to him.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
#10
He may have thought this wouldn't last that long and killed his canteens early so he wouldn't have to lug around the weight. Ive seen plenty of guys do that on land nav courses before. Not to mention that anyone who has done several of these has seen the hapless groups of people waiting around for someone to give them a clue as to where they are.
That's the most plausible explanation so far that I've seen. I heard there was a lot of water sources nearby though. The guy must have really freaked out. Especially since they said there was a siren after the 3 hour mark and all you'd need to do is follow the sound.

It's still a rather short timeframe to die. Usually a person after a couple hours or even a day, is freaking out and actually efforting to save themself.
 

ern

Hiding behind my keyboard
#11
That's the most plausible explanation so far that I've seen. I heard there was a lot of water sources nearby though. The guy must have really freaked out. Especially since they said there was a siren after the 3 hour mark and all you'd need to do is follow the sound.

It's still a rather short timeframe to die. Usually a person after a couple hours or even a day, is freaking out and actually efforting to save themself.
Yeah, besides, those of us who have been in the military know that they won't publicly say things that would disparrage the soldier, as the family has suffered enough. This is purely speculative though, if the guy went out and partied hard the night before - as most soldiers have been known to do, he would have been dehydrated before he even set out. the little water he was carrying with him may not have been enough. you become dehydrated, you don't think clearly, you become slightly dysfunctional, and thought intensive skills like map reading, resecting/intersecting, and terrain association become a little fuzzy. All you want to do is sit down, your hearing is harder, and you don't respond to verbal communication.

Hyperthermia, Hyperthermia (hyperpyrexia), in its advanced state referred to as heat stroke or sunstroke, is an acute condition which occurs when the body produces or absorbs more heat than it can dissipate. It is usually due to excessive exposure to heat. The heat-regulating mechanisms of the body eventually become overwhelmed and unable to effectively deal with the heat, and body temperature climbs uncontrollably. This is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate medical attention.

Hypothermia refers to any condition in which the temperature of a body drops below the level required for normal metabolism and/or bodily function to take place. In warm-blooded animals, core body temperature is maintained at or near a constant level through biologic homeostasis. When the body is exposed to colder temperatures, however, its internal mechanisms may be unable to replenish the heat that is being lost to the body's surroundings.

I think people are confusing the two terms.
 
#12
Hyperthermia, Hyperthermia (hyperpyrexia), in its advanced state referred to as heat stroke or sunstroke, is an acute condition which occurs when the body produces or absorbs more heat than it can dissipate.
Ohhhh I misread the article and thought it said, "Hypothermia" instead of "Hyper-" with heat exhaustion.

I can understand how he would die now :) Those camelbaks only carry like 1.5 liters.
 

MrAbovePar

En Taro Anthony
#13
Yea...I was wondering if he had a little too much alcohol beforehand and was busy sweating all his vital fluids out. Probably would mistake the headaches and such for being hungover.
 

mascan42

Registered User
#14
Officials have said Sprader had two canteens of water, a water backpack and two Meals Ready To Eat when he left. His body was found near plenty of drinking water from creeks and other sources, said Robert Volk, Fort Hood's chief game warden.
How do you die of dehydration next to a creek?
Sprader had returned from an Iraq deployment in September and worked in the criminal investigation division of Fort Hood.
Red flag there. Isn't that the Army's equivalent of Internal Affairs?
 
#15
This kind of stuff goes to show how much technology buoys up our soldiers today. Everyone is used to GPS, satellite communication and all of the other goodies that come with the territory. Just a hundred years ago, wandering around a sprawling Texas countryside for four days was calling "living". Think about it.
 

N.Y. Johnny

Fake Twitter Friend
#16
How do you die of dehydration next to a creek?

Red flag there. Isn't that the Army's equivalent of Internal Affairs?



In that part of Texas, very easily. Don't let that "90 degree" heat quote fool you, it may say 90, but it feels like fucking 110 and as humid as it is down here it feels like when you open an oven when you walk out here. Its fucking hot and bad.
Also someone mentioned something like if he was going through the "hangover" type thing being all dehydrated like that and sweating out fluids will do it, you'll get a sunstroke and be done for down here.

If there is truth to the "conspiracy" angle, I agree there maybe a red flag with what he's done before.. Perhaps he saw or knew something that happened over there and he got offed too.
 

ern

Hiding behind my keyboard
#17
Sprader disappeared Friday during the exercise testing basic map-reading and navigation skills in a rugged exercise area at the sprawling central Texas post.

Commanders said that when they reached Sprader on his phone late Friday — the last time anyone spoke to him — he was determined to finish the exercise and did not indicate he was ill or distressed.
- what you call "driving on" this mindset is exactly why all the special/elite military units never seem to win eco challenges, when they typically should.

I can see why some would argue that this seems strange, and potentially a big gov coverup MAAANNN!

I've just been attempting to speculate all the normal reasons this could happen. If you have never had heat exhaustion/stroke or have seen it hit someone else, you can't understand how it can utterly end your life. If this guy ever went down with heat exhaustion previously, then he is predisposed to get it quicker the next time. Besides, he was on a casual stroll in the woods behind his house, on a cool night, wearing shorts and a tshirt.

BDU's, canteens, LBEs, rucksacks, boots - not exactly condusive to warm climates. Yes, I have run klicks in the bush with all this gear on, and I have watched seeemingly normal people go down doing the same exact thing.
 

mascan42

Registered User
#18
If there is truth to the "conspiracy" angle, I agree there maybe a red flag with what he's done before.. Perhaps he saw or knew something that happened over there and he got offed too.
I was thinking more that he had investigated somebody who held a grudge, and then they were part of the same exercise and incapacitated him in some way. If he then was also part of the search party, he could have then cleaned up the evidence.

BTW, if anybody takes this and writes a script for CSI, I want story credit.
 

cozzie

head retard
#19
I've had heat exhaustion before , luckily it was during a squad exercise, so my Sgt started pouring water on me, taking off my BDU's (no homo) Last thing I remember was having a horrible headache, other than that don't remember anything. As far as Sgt's not being able to read maps, When I was in Germany, we went to the border for patrol. 1 day Me another E-4 , And AN SSG were on patrol & we accidentally went past the blue Border poles by maybe 10 yards. At our debreifing we all denied crossing the border, later Our SSG was getting debreifed, he said we had crossed the border and he had "us" about 10 miles into East Germany. So I can see how this could happen .
 
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