Mitchell Report Listening (Viewing, Reading, etc.) Thread

MJMANDALAY

Registered User
Jan 26, 2005
0
#1
December 13, 2007 a BIG Day in Major League Baseball

George Mitchell to Release Baseball Drugs Report Thursday


NEW YORK (AP) -- George Mitchell called a news conference for Thursday to announce the results of his 20-month investigation into drug use in baseball.

Bud Selig does not plan to attend the news conference at a Manhattan hotel a few blocks from the commissioner's office.

Mitchell said Wednesday he will release his report then, and it will be posted online at MLB.com shortly after that. Selig will hold his own news conference 2 1/2 hours after the one by Mitchell.

Baseball reviewed a draft Tuesday at the Manhattan office of DLA Piper, the law firm that Mitchell chairs, a baseball official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because Mitchell hasn't authorized any statements.

Baseball officials have said for several weeks that management would be able to examine the report on performance-enhancing drugs a few days before it is made public to make sure it does not contain confidential information that if released would violate the collective bargaining agreement between players and owners.

The joint drug agreement, which has been part of the labor contract since September 2002, prohibits the commissioner's office, teams and consultants from disclosing player test results, treatment and other information except in very limited, specified circumstances.

Mitchell, a former Senate majority leader, is a director of the Boston Red Sox and served on one of Selig's economic study committees. Selig hired him in March 2006 to investigate drug use in the sport.

He's expected by many in baseball to be critical of the sport for being slow to react to its drug problem in 1990s and beyond. What they will be looking to see in his report is how he parcels blame among Selig, club owners, general managers, other team employees, the players' association and players themselves.

The revelation of players who have not yet been publicly linked to drug use figures to be the most sensational part of the report. Media reports have linked an array of All-Stars and MVPs to performance-enhancers in recent years, among them Barry Bonds, Jose Canseco, Ken Caminiti, Juan Gonzalez and Mark McGwire.

Bonds, indicted last month for perjury and obstruction of justice over his 2003 testimony in the BALCO drug case, has denied knowingly using performance-enhancers, as have Gonzalez and McGwire.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#2
mike and the mad dog were teasing some info mike got today. they were basically hinting that they yankee dynasty is going to be represented in the report, heavily hinted that Bernie Williams will be named. maybe Petitie.
 

Budyzir

There's nothing quite like a shorn scrotum.
Nov 12, 2004
0
#3
This will be interesting.
 

Perch1019

Registered User
Oct 4, 2004
678
#4
mike and the mad dog were teasing some info mike got today. they were basically hinting that they yankee dynasty is going to be represented in the report, heavily hinted that Bernie Williams will be named. maybe Petitie.
One of the guys who helped or was a part of the investigation worked with Pettite and Clemens.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#5
One of the guys who helped or was a part of the investigation worked with Pettite and Clemens.
Petites name appeared on a list in one of the lesser known stories that has come out. not sure which one it is, do you? it might be the Evander Holyfield one, the doctors list where Evander had the steroids and HGH mailed to his address under the name "Evan Fields" with a phone number, that is his. espn reported this but it wasnt widely talked about
 

rustytrombone1

Registered User
May 26, 2005
0
#6
If Eddie Gaedel's name gets dragged into this, you know the report's bullshit!!
 

mik3

fornicating madly
Mar 29, 2004
0
#7
From the Yankees I'd say
Pettitte
Clemens
Giambi
Sheffield
Sierra
Bernie
Damon

Also, don't expect any current Red Sox on the list.

It's supposed to be HEAVY in former and current Mets though.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#8
I want to see what they say about dominican players who supposedly take hgh like vitamins when they are coming up
 

mik3

fornicating madly
Mar 29, 2004
0
#9
Tejada will probably one of the guys whose name comes up. Expect a lot of venezuelans and mexicans since they can get their hands on most PEDS legally at home.
 

mik3

fornicating madly
Mar 29, 2004
0
#11
Everything coming out about this report is saying it's just a witch hunt and won't solve anything, just get some attention away from baseball for a bit.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#12
Everything coming out about this report is saying it's just a witch hunt and won't solve anything, just get some attention away from baseball for a bit.
everything being the comments from people inside baseball, fearful of blame ending up on their doorstep.
 

mik3

fornicating madly
Mar 29, 2004
0
#13
everything being the comments from people inside baseball, fearful of blame ending up on their doorstep.
Supposedly a LOT of blame is being put on owners, which is weird since Mitchell is a part owner of the Red Sox.
 

DiscountHarry

We get it, Krisko has nice cleavage.
Jul 20, 2007
0
#14
If Bonds is not on this list people will completely ignore it.

With MLB instituting HGH testing next season, you can bank on the fact that Clemens will not be coming back next season.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#15
Supposedly a LOT of blame is being put on owners, which is weird since Mitchell is a part owner of the Red Sox.
bryant had that article on espn.com yesterday throwing doubt over the whole report. but all I read were GMs, trainers, and others inside they game trying to throw doubt on the report because they basically dont want to open up honestly, and dont want any blame ore responsibility.
 

mik3

fornicating madly
Mar 29, 2004
0
#16
bryant had that article on espn.com yesterday throwing doubt over the whole report. but all I read were GMs, trainers, and others inside they game trying to throw doubt on the report because they basically dont want to open up honestly, and dont want any blame ore responsibility.
Well when it's run by a current owner, the main person involved is trying to avoid major jail time, and a lot of the players talked to have already admitted to stuff and had nothing to lose then yeah there's questions to be asked.
 

mendozathejew

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
0
#17
Im not concerned about George Mitchell's credibility and possibility for bias. not at all.
 

MJMANDALAY

Registered User
Jan 26, 2005
0
#18
Could somebody post the story when it comes out. I will be working when it is released. Thanx
 

norton23

Opie And Anthony Always Win In The End
Dec 1, 2002
0
#19
A-ROD ROID BUST!!!!!!!!!!!!

I've been waiting for this list, can't wait to see who fucked up!
 
Jun 30, 2005
681
#20
it's A-ROID

THe report comes out at 2 eastern according to the news...


THey really hinted at MVP's being on the list...but everyone is forgetting world series mvp's...Like Manny Ramirez...he is a house... :(

Yeah, apparently it is a pitcher heavy list which makes sense b/c they have to recover faster from workouts/pitching which is why i think johan santana is on the list and why the sox havn't struck a deal yet
 

NightStalker3

a complete moron that posts
Oct 4, 2004
36
#21
"I certainly hope after 21 months and getting zip by way of cooperation from the players' association that they'll come up with some recommendations for improvement," said World Anti-Doping Agency chairman Dick Pound. "If not, it's a complete waste of time."

But he said he's not sure baseball would follow any recommendations.

"My guess is that the management side probably would, but the players' association will dig in and continue its steel-town union approach to life," he said.


Who will be named? Any guesses?

My Top 5

Andruw Jones (i hope not but his body is breaking down...)
Mark Belhorn
Nomar Garciaparra (see SI cover)
Roger Clemens
Kevin Mench (biggest hat size in baseball)
 

Kid Brock

No longer VegasBrock
Jul 26, 2005
0
#22
A-ROD ROID BUST!!!!!!!!!!!!

I've been waiting for this list, can't wait to see who fucked up!

"Industry sources claim to expect many prominent Yankees on the list including Roger Clemens"
 

Redding

Why can't us?
Mar 20, 2005
276
#23
Source says information on Clemens will be in Mitchell's report
ESPN.com news services

Updated: December 13, 2007, 10:26 AM ET

Clemens May Be Named in Mitchell ReportA former New York Yankee strength trainer says information he supplied to the George Mitchell investigation regarding supplying Roger Clemens with steroids is included in the Mitchell report scheduled to be released later today, a source close to the trainer told ESPN The Magazine's Shaun Assael.




Brian McNamee, who worked for the Yankees and as a personal trainer for Clemens and Yankee teammates Andy Pettitte, also told investigators that on at least one occasion, Clemens was in possession of steroids from another supplier, the source said.




The source said McNamee told investigators he supplied Clemens with steroids while Clemens was witih the Yankees, and prior to Clemens joining the team.

Also, The Bergen (N.J.) Record, citing a baseball industry official, says "several" prominent Yankees will be named in the Mitchell report. The paper said the source spoke to a third party who had seen the final report.

"It's going to be a rough day in the Bronx," the paper quoted the source as saying.

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig told the Chicago Tribune that he hadn't seen the report, but he was proud it is coming out.

"People can say Bud was just trying to cover his butt or take care of his legacy or whatever," Selig said, according to the Tribune. "I say [bleep] it. This needed to be done, and now we've done it. I'm just happy it will be out there and we can move on. I'm proud of it."

Scott Boras, who represents a number of high-profile players including Yankee third baseman Alex Rodriguez, told the Los Angeles Times he hadn't read the report. He did, however, say he's skeptical because "the concerns of due process and the standards that apply to it are relatively unknown. Certainly, any results that occur from the report have to be looked at in the light that this is not a collectively bargained effort."

"I'm going to assume that a lot of the basis for this is hearsay information," Boras said, according to the Times. "It's not based on any kind of clinical testing, so it is widely a product of hearsay testimony. Without clinical testing or hard evidence, any report like this has to be reviewed with great scrutiny."
 

Redding

Why can't us?
Mar 20, 2005
276
#24
Batboy key to report
Breakthrough for Mitchell

(12-12) 21:37 PST -- Former Senator George Mitchell's report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball relied heavily on the confessions of a former Mets batboy who was required to cooperate with investigators as a part of his plea bargain in a steroid-dealing case.

Mitchell, retained 21 months ago by Commissioner Bud Selig to probe baseball's so-called Steroid Era, was scheduled to make his report public today at a New York news conference. The Chronicle confirmed that the report would identify approximately 60 to 80 active and retired major-league players as users of steroids, human growth hormone and other banned drugs.

Selig ordered the probe in response to former Giants star Barry Bonds' involvement in the BALCO scandal. Federal prosecutors from the BALCO case made their witnesses off limits to Mitchell, a source familiar with the matter said. Nevertheless, The Chronicle confirmed, Mitchell's report will address alleged steroid use by Bonds. Bonds, who told a federal grand jury in the BALCO investigation that he didn't knowingly use banned drugs, is awaiting trial on perjury charges.

Mitchell's report, more than 300 pages in length, was also expected to propose a series of reforms to control the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. The Washington Post, quoting sources briefed on the investigation, said Mitchell would recommend turning baseball's entire drug-testing program over to an outside agency.

A source familiar with the matter said Mitchell had obtained significant new information about drug use in the game from Kirk Radomski, 38, who met with Mitchell's investigators this year. Radomski is a former Mets batboy and clubhouse attendant who for years dealt performance-enhancing drugs to baseball players, court records show.

Before Radomski was ordered to cooperate, Mitchell had complained that he was having trouble finding witnesses for his report.

"Mitchell was hamstrung 20 different ways," said Marc L. Mukasey, a criminal-defense specialist and former prosecutor in New York who has followed the investigation. "He had no subpoena powers, he faces very serious labor law issues and, as I understand it, there wasn't a line of players beating down the doors to help him out."

In a Dec. 13, 2005, federal affidavit to search his Long Island home, Radomski was described as "a major drug source in professional baseball who took over after the BALCO laboratories were taken down."

IRS Agent Jeff Novitzky, who also was lead investigator on the BALCO case, quoted an informant as saying that "if a professional baseball player was currently using performance-enhancing drugs including human growth hormone ... then the player would likely be getting it from Kirk Radomski."

Radomski worked for the Mets from 1985 until 1995, then became a personal trainer. With longtime Mets clubhouse attendant Vinny Greco, he operated a Long Island car wash called Pro Touch Detail, records show.

In February 2005, an informant told the FBI that Radomski was selling steroids to baseball players, court records show. At the time, former big-league slugger Jose Canseco's confessional memoir about steroids in baseball had just been published.

During 2005, undercover agents made several steroids buys from Radomski, the government said. Then federal agents raided Radomski's home on Long Island, seizing "thousands of doses of numerous types of anabolic steroids," the government said. The agents also seized vials of human growth hormone, insulin, clenbuterol (an asthma drug with muscle-building properties), and Clomid (a masking agent), court records show.

Facing a possible 25-year prison sentence, Radomski in April pleaded guilty to steroid dealing in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. He is still awaiting sentencing.

As part of his plea agreement, Radomski was ordered to provide information to Mitchell's investigators, court records show. In their probe, federal agents had obtained Radomski's client list, along with bank records showing as many as 23 "MLB associated individuals" who wrote checks to Radomski's account and a list of "current and former MLB players" whose numbers appeared in his phone records.

Baseball's powerful players union advised members not to talk to Mitchell without a lawyer present, lest they face discipline or prosecution for things they might admit. As a result, almost all refused to talk to Mitchell, with the lone known exception being the Yankees' Jason Giambi, who had told the BALCO grand jury he used drugs obtained from Greg Anderson, Bonds' personal trainer.
 

Redding

Why can't us?
Mar 20, 2005
276
#25
Baseball Braces for Steroid Report From Mitchell

By DUFF WILSON and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
Published: December 13, 2007

George J. Mitchell’s report on performance-enhancing drugs in baseball, to be unveiled Thursday afternoon, will be highly critical of the commissioner’s office and the players’ union for tolerating the presence of drugs throughout years of abuse, a person who has read the closely guarded report said Wednesday.

Mitchell has been battling the union during his 20-month investigation, but sharp criticism of Commissioner Bud Selig, who hired Mitchell and is paying for his investigation, would be more unexpected and would seemingly prove Mitchell’s claim of independence in this endeavor.

Selig, the commissioner since 1992, and Donald Fehr, the executive director of the players’ association since 1986, have scheduled separate news conferences after Mitchell holds a briefing. The three sessions will take place within blocks of one another in Midtown Manhattan.

Mitchell’s report will total roughly 300 pages, and also have substantial attachments, according to the person who read it. It will pull player names from three main sources: Kirk Radomski, a former Mets clubhouse attendant who pleaded guilty to steroid offenses in April and says he supplied players with performance-enhancing drugs from 1995 to 2005; the Signature Pharmacy investigation led by the Albany County district attorney; and one other source that the person did not make clear. The bulk of the names are believed to be from Radomski.

The person who read the report also said that information from Brian McNamee, a former Yankees strength coach who has worked as a personal trainer for Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte, had been provided to Mitchell’s investigators. It was not clear if McNamee spoke directly to the investigators, or if information he provided is in the report.

In a conference call Wednesday to discuss his 2008 contract with the Yankees, Pettitte said that he was not working out with McNamee and did not know if McNamee had spoken to Mitchell’s investigators.

Over all, Mitchell has interviewed scores of former players and club executives. But the report will state that there is a lot of information the investigation did not uncover, the person said, making it unlikely that baseball’s steroids issue will be put to rest.

That person and one other person familiar with Mitchell’s findings said the report would name more than 50 active and former major league players who are linked to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. The person who read the report said among those named would be the winners of Cy Young and Most Valuable Player awards.

The report is also expected to call for beefed-up testing, but it apparently does not address the use of amphetamines.

Baseball officials felt the report was harsh when they read it this week, the second person said. The sources were granted anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the report.

The players’ association is expecting to be attacked for doing what it says was nothing more than what it was supposed to do: advising players of the harm that could come from talking to Mitchell. Partly as a result of that advice, only one current major league player, Jason Giambi, is known to have cooperated with the investigation, and then only after Selig threatened to suspend him for tacitly acknowledging steroid use.

A former prosecutor and United States senator, Mitchell was appointed by Selig to conduct the investigation in March 2006.

Informed Wednesday that the Mitchell report would pointedly criticize the commissioner’s office, Fay Vincent, Selig’s predecessor, said, “Very interesting.” In a telephone interview from Florida, Vincent declined further comment until he read the report. “I do have expectations, but I’m almost certain to be proven wrong,” he said.

Vincent had tried to crack down on steroids in his last year as the commissioner. In June 1991, he sent every major league club a memorandum saying all illegal drug use was “strictly prohibited” by law, “cannot be condoned or tolerated” and could result in discipline or expulsion. Vincent specifically highlighted steroids in the memo.

The next year, Selig became commissioner. Through the 1990s, even as newspapers reported that as many as one in five baseball players used steroids, Selig and the union played down the issue. “If baseball has a problem, I must say candidly that we were not aware of it,” Selig said in 1995.

In 2000, The New York Times reported steroids were rampant in baseball, but a baseball spokesman said they “have never been much of an issue.” In 2002, after a Sports Illustrated cover story said baseball “had become a pharmacological trade show,” the commissioner and the union finally agreed on a testing policy.

Random tests would be done in 2003 without penalties. If more than 5 percent of players failed the tests, penalties would be imposed starting in 2004, which is what happened. The penalty for a first offense was treatment, and for five violations, a one-year suspension. That policy failed to satisfy critics.

In 2005, as a congressional hearing was approaching, Selig and the union reopened the collective-bargaining agreement to toughen the penalties to start at a 10-day suspension and public identification of a first offender.

At the time, Selig cited a survey showing steroid use in baseball had fallen to 1 to 2 percent in 2004, compared with 5 to 7 percent in 2003.

“I have an enormous responsibility as the commissioner to clean this thing up,” Selig said then. “The fact is, we had a problem. The fact is, we’ve done something about it. We have done now as much as we can do.”

But when a House committee subpoenaed the actual policy documents, it found they were more lax than had been claimed. The penalty for a first offense was actually a 10-day suspension or a fine. If a player was only fined, he would not be identified.

Outraged members of Congress blasted Selig and Fehr. Senator John McCain wrote, “I can reach no conclusion but that the league and the players’ union have misrepresented to me and to the American public the substance of M.L.B.’s new steroid policy.”

The next month, after the televised hearing, at which Sammy Sosa denied use and Mark McGwire declined to answer questions, Selig wrote the union to ask for a new steroids policy, “three strikes and you’re out.” It would apply a 50-game suspension for a first offense, 100 games for a second offense and a lifetime ban for a third offense.

Fehr and the players’ association approved the three-strikes policy in December 2005.

Three months later, Selig appointed Mitchell to conduct his investigation.