MoviePass is now $9.99/Month: See 3 standard movies a month

Bill Lehecka

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Dec 8, 2004
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#1
So apparently the CEO of MoviePass went insane.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...-pay-10-a-month-go-to-the-movies-all-you-want

Netflix Co-Founder’s Crazy Plan: Pay $10 a Month, Go to the Movies All You Want
MoviePass wants to subsidize your film habit, letting you go to the theater once a day for about the price of a single ticket.
By Isabel Gottlieb
August 15, 2017, 6:05 AM EDT August 15, 2017, 5:24 PM EDT

As movie theaters struggle with tepid sales, Mitch Lowe has an extreme proposal for how to get more people into seats: Let them come to all the showings they want for about the price of a single ticket each month.

Lowe, an early Netflix Inc. executive who now runs a startup called MoviePass, plans to drop the price of the company’s movie ticket subscriptions on Tuesday to $9.95. The fee will let customers get in to one showing every day at any theater in the U.S. that accepts debit cards. MoviePass will pay theaters the full price of each ticket used by subscribers, excluding 3D or Imax screens.

MoviePass could lose a lot of money subsidizing people’s movie habits. So the company also raised cash on Tuesday by selling a majority stake to Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc., a small, publicly traded data firm in New York. The companies declined to comment on terms of the financing but said MoviePass intends to hold an initial public offering by March. Helios and Metheson shares rose 5.7 percent to $2.95 at the close Tuesday in New York.

Ted Farnsworth, chief executive officer at Helios and Matheson, said the goal is to amass a large base of customers and collect data on viewing behaviors. That information could then be used to eventually target advertisements or other marketing materials to subscribers. “It’s no different than Facebook or Google,” Farnsworth said. “The more we understand our fans, the more we can target them.”

Theater operators should certainly welcome any effort to increase sales. The top four cinema operators, led by AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc., lost $1.3 billion in market value early this month after a disappointing summer. The number of tickets sold in the U.S. and Canada last year declined slightly, while box office revenue rose just 2 percent thanks to pricier tickets, according to the Motion Picture Association of America, a trade group. The cost of a ticket has almost doubled in the last two decades, according to the website Box Office Mojo. The average price is about $8.89 this year, though it can be much higher in some cities.

Shares of theater companies fell Tuesday on concerns that MoviePass’s pricing would hurt studios or exhibitors. AMC’s stock declined 2.6 percent to $13.25 at the close.

Investors may be misinterpreting the MoviePass business model, Eric Wold, an analyst at B Riley & Co. wrote in a note to clients. If MoviePass can drive more people to theaters that would benefit the exhibitors, although the overall impact is “more negligible than anything,” Wold wrote.

business model similar to a gym membership. The company hoped to turn profit from subscribers who paid $30 or more per month but didn’t use the service often enough to justify the cost. Lowe, a fixture of the home video business who helped get Netflix off the ground and served as president of rental-kiosk operator Redbox, was named CEO last year. The privately held company declined to disclose subscriber numbers or financial information. Lowe said the data-based business model is still “years in the future.”

With the new strategy, MoviePass hopes to resolve what Lowe sees as the biggest factor to blame for the theater industry’s decline. He said the high price of tickets, not competition from Netflix or Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime Video service, is a big part of what’s keeping people away. “People really do want to go more often,” Lowe said. “They just don’t like the transaction.”
 

Bill Lehecka

The Fat Horse v. 2.0
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Dec 8, 2004
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#2
I don't see this model working out long-term. I get he wants to build in the subscriber base, and he's basically offering up people's demographics so ads can be targeted properly... But still, how is this possible? It was $30/month for this same plan, and now it's $9.99?

I signed up. We'll see how it goes. The website is, as expected, slammed.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
142,481
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#3
So apparently the CEO of MoviePass went insane.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...-pay-10-a-month-go-to-the-movies-all-you-want

Netflix Co-Founder’s Crazy Plan: Pay $10 a Month, Go to the Movies All You Want
MoviePass wants to subsidize your film habit, letting you go to the theater once a day for about the price of a single ticket.
By Isabel Gottlieb
August 15, 2017, 6:05 AM EDT August 15, 2017, 5:24 PM EDT

As movie theaters struggle with tepid sales, Mitch Lowe has an extreme proposal for how to get more people into seats: Let them come to all the showings they want for about the price of a single ticket each month.

Lowe, an early Netflix Inc. executive who now runs a startup called MoviePass, plans to drop the price of the company’s movie ticket subscriptions on Tuesday to $9.95. The fee will let customers get in to one showing every day at any theater in the U.S. that accepts debit cards. MoviePass will pay theaters the full price of each ticket used by subscribers, excluding 3D or Imax screens.

MoviePass could lose a lot of money subsidizing people’s movie habits. So the company also raised cash on Tuesday by selling a majority stake to Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc., a small, publicly traded data firm in New York. The companies declined to comment on terms of the financing but said MoviePass intends to hold an initial public offering by March. Helios and Metheson shares rose 5.7 percent to $2.95 at the close Tuesday in New York.

Ted Farnsworth, chief executive officer at Helios and Matheson, said the goal is to amass a large base of customers and collect data on viewing behaviors. That information could then be used to eventually target advertisements or other marketing materials to subscribers. “It’s no different than Facebook or Google,” Farnsworth said. “The more we understand our fans, the more we can target them.”

Theater operators should certainly welcome any effort to increase sales. The top four cinema operators, led by AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc., lost $1.3 billion in market value early this month after a disappointing summer. The number of tickets sold in the U.S. and Canada last year declined slightly, while box office revenue rose just 2 percent thanks to pricier tickets, according to the Motion Picture Association of America, a trade group. The cost of a ticket has almost doubled in the last two decades, according to the website Box Office Mojo. The average price is about $8.89 this year, though it can be much higher in some cities.

Shares of theater companies fell Tuesday on concerns that MoviePass’s pricing would hurt studios or exhibitors. AMC’s stock declined 2.6 percent to $13.25 at the close.

Investors may be misinterpreting the MoviePass business model, Eric Wold, an analyst at B Riley & Co. wrote in a note to clients. If MoviePass can drive more people to theaters that would benefit the exhibitors, although the overall impact is “more negligible than anything,” Wold wrote.

business model similar to a gym membership. The company hoped to turn profit from subscribers who paid $30 or more per month but didn’t use the service often enough to justify the cost. Lowe, a fixture of the home video business who helped get Netflix off the ground and served as president of rental-kiosk operator Redbox, was named CEO last year. The privately held company declined to disclose subscriber numbers or financial information. Lowe said the data-based business model is still “years in the future.”

With the new strategy, MoviePass hopes to resolve what Lowe sees as the biggest factor to blame for the theater industry’s decline. He said the high price of tickets, not competition from Netflix or Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime Video service, is a big part of what’s keeping people away. “People really do want to go more often,” Lowe said. “They just don’t like the transaction.”
I would so get this.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#7
It's like in Brewster's Millions, or Willy Wonka, or Emmanuelle in Space. #References
Emmanuelle in Space? The only R rated stuff I feel comfortable watching is only rated that for language, and even then I prefer stuff on the border of hard PG-13! I still cover my eyes at nudity and gore!
 

Pigdango

Silence, you mortal Fuck!
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Jun 22, 2004
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#8
I don't see this model working out long-term. I get he wants to build in the subscriber base, and he's basically offering up people's demographics so ads can be targeted properly... But still, how is this possible? It was $30/month for this same plan, and now it's $9.99?
It doesn't have to work long term. That's not the goal.

It has to see a huge uptick in subscribers and a recordable uptick in ticket sales that go through their program.

I signed up. We'll see how it goes. The website is, as expected, slammed.
Mission accomplished on part one. Now go look at the release schedule for the next 4 months compared to last year. It's fucking stacked. Some highlights:

Thor v Doc Strange
Justice League v Arrival
Last Jedi v Rogue One

The 4th quarter is going to grow vs last year regardless of this. But now they get to take credit for it. And they will get that credit based on all the stories about how the industry is in crisis.

Now they do two things:

1 - go to studios and say "you wanna know who sees your movie and when? Pay us."

2 - go to the theaters and say "want us to keep this rate and keep asses in the seats? Give us a discounted rate."

And they'll get both. Easily. They'll lose their shirts for 4-6 months but will be turning a profit before next summer.
 
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Hog's Big Ben

Getting ass-***** in The Octagon, brother.
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Jul 28, 2005
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#9
Jesus. I might start going to the movies again.
 

mikeybot

SPANAKOPITA!!!
Jul 25, 2005
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#11
It doesn't have to work long term. That's not the goal.

It has to see a huge uptick in subscribers and a recordable uptick in ticket sales that go through their program.


Mission accomplished on part one. Now go look at the release schedule for the next 4 months compared to last year. It's fucking stacked. Some highlights:

Thor v Doc Strange
Justice League v Arrival
Last Jedi v Rogue One

The 4 quarter is going to grow vs last year regardless of this. But now they get to take credit for it. And they will get that credit based on all the stories about how the industry is in crisis.

Now they do two things:

1 - go to studios and say "you wanna know who sees your movie and when? Pay us."

2 - go to the theaters and say "want us to keep this rate and keep asses in the seats? Give us a discounted rate."

And they'll get both. Easily. They'll lose their shirts for 4-6 months but will be turning a profit before next summer.

This and not every one going will be a cheap asshole like me, bringing their own food and drinks in.
They make most of their profit on concessions to start with.
 

Pigdango

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Jun 22, 2004
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#13
And of course AMC is already poo pooing it. I'm not entirely sure why.
 

Pigdango

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Jun 22, 2004
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#15
Maybe because they see the "discounted rate" coming.
Yep. The guy is already talking about forcing the theaters to "make them whole" by giving them a cut of concessions.

I've noticed a few issues with this service that have me hesitating a bit. The main thing is you can only buy your tickets 30 minutes in advance of the show. So you can't use it for any decent sized movie's opening weekend, because you generally need to be in your seat 30 minutes before the show starts, and will have had to buy your ticket well in advance of that.

So if I take out movies I'm going to see on opening weekend, how many movies do I really see a month? Sometimes it's none.
 

Bill Lehecka

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#16
Yep. The guy is already talking about forcing the theaters to "make them whole" by giving them a cut of concessions.

I've noticed a few issues with this service that have me hesitating a bit. The main thing is you can only buy your tickets 30 minutes in advance of the show. So you can't use it for any decent sized movie's opening weekend, because you generally need to be in your seat 30 minutes before the show starts, and will have had to buy your ticket well in advance of that.

So if I take out movies I'm going to see on opening weekend, how many movies do I really see a month? Sometimes it's none.
Hmmm... Half hour, ey?

That seems weird.

I did read there are some advance purchase options available. But again, I'll know fully when I get the card.
 

Pigdango

Silence, you mortal Fuck!
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Jun 22, 2004
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#17
Hmmm... Half hour, ey?

That seems weird.

I did read there are some advance purchase options available. But again, I'll know fully when I get the card.

  1. MoviePass can only be used for same day tickets.
  2. When you arrive at the theater, browse movies and showtimes on the MoviePass app. Be sure to have your MoviePass card handy!
  3. Once you’ve found your film, click your desired showtime. Then, at the bottom of the screen, click “Check-In.”
  4. Upon check-in, your MoviePass will be activated for 30 minutes. Simply swipe it at the box office or kiosk to purchase your ticket.
Maybe I'm misreading this. Maybe you can activate your movie pass and buy the tickets earlier in the day. But you do have to buy them that day. Again, for movies like Star Wars, Thor, Justice League - probably not an option.
 

Bill Lehecka

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#18
  1. MoviePass can only be used for same day tickets.
  2. When you arrive at the theater, browse movies and showtimes on the MoviePass app. Be sure to have your MoviePass card handy!
  3. Once you’ve found your film, click your desired showtime. Then, at the bottom of the screen, click “Check-In.”
  4. Upon check-in, your MoviePass will be activated for 30 minutes. Simply swipe it at the box office or kiosk to purchase your ticket.
Maybe I'm misreading this. Maybe you can activate your movie pass and buy the tickets earlier in the day. But you do have to buy them that day. Again, for movies like Star Wars, Thor, Justice League - probably not an option.
Well, you're not getting a 3D or IMAX film, that's for sure.

They do have an e-Ticket option, so maybe you can just claim an e-ticket for a future day? Or if you wanted to see Last Jedi opening night, you just show up at the theater in the morning, get a showing that's not sold out, claim the tixs, then walk out. That would work, in theory, but it's a pain in the butt if you have to go to the theater twice in one day.

This seems to need experimentation, and I'm willing to give it a try for $9.99/month.
 

Bill Lehecka

The Fat Horse v. 2.0
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#19
Can I use MoviePass to purchase advanced tickets?

MoviePass can only be used for same day tickets.

What is E-Ticketing?

E-ticketing is a simple redemption process that allows you to reserve your same-day ticket in our MoviePass app, before arriving at the the theater. Simply open your app and select your theater. From the list of films that appear, select your desired showtime and confirm your check-in. This check-in will generate a redemption code that you can present at the kiosk or box office to retrieve your ticket.

Can we reserve our seats in the app?

At theaters where reserved seating is available, e-ticketing will also allow you to select your seat in advance. These theaters are indicated by a red chair icon.

How do I use MoviePass?

Using your MoviePass subscription is easy! See below for step-by-step instructions.

  1. When you arrive at the theater, browse movies and showtimes on the MoviePass app. Be sure to have your MoviePass card handy!
  2. Once you’ve found your film, click your desired showtime. Then, at the bottom of the screen, click “Check-In.”
  3. Upon check-in, your MoviePass will be activated for 30 minutes. Simply swipe it at the box office or kiosk to purchase your ticket.
  4. For e-ticketing theaters, once you check-in, your app will generate a confirmation code that you can present at the kiosk or box office to retrieve your ticket.
  5. Enjoy the show!
Does my app check-in reserve my ticket?

Our e-ticketing feature (available at Goodrich Quality Theaters, B&B Theatres, Studio Movie Grill, MJR Theaters, & participating AMC Theaters in the Boston and Denver area) allows you to reserve your ticket in our app. At theaters that do not support e-ticketing, your app check-in does not reserve your ticket/seat. Instead, it loads funds to your MoviePass, so that you can purchase your ticket.

Are there any restrictions?

Your $9.95 unlimited MoviePass subscription allows you to see one standard 2D movie every calendar day at any participating theater. We currently do not support (in part or entirety) any enhanced or special screenings that involve an upcharge at the theater. Examples of these would include 3D, IMAX, Fathom Events, DBOX, ETX/RPX, film festival screenings, etc.

Your MoviePass card can only be used to purchase a ticket to the screening listed on your check-in. Using your card to purchase a different ticket is against our terms & conditions, which can result in your account cancellation.
 
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mrfarstucker

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Apr 24, 2006
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#20
Ted Farnsworth, chief executive officer at Helios and Matheson, said the goal is to amass a large base of customers and collect data on viewing behaviors. That information could then be used to eventually target advertisements or other marketing materials to subscribers. “It’s no different than Facebook or Google,” Farnsworth said. “The more we understand our fans, the more we can target them.
 

Bill Lehecka

The Fat Horse v. 2.0
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#21
So if you want to get a ticket without e-ticket, you would have to show up at the theater, check in, and then you have 30 minutes to purchase and print out your ticket. That does mean you can go to a later showing that day, but you have to purchase the ticket in that 30 minute window where you have funds on the card.

This could be problematic for event films on opening night like Star Wars, but since you can only get a 2D ticket, there may be some availability since the hardcore peeps will want to see it in 3D/IMAX.
 

Pigdango

Silence, you mortal Fuck!
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Jun 22, 2004
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#23
Don't most theaters not accept passes of any kind for the first 10 days of release?
This isn't a pass. You get a Movietickets branded MasterCard Debit card when you sign up.

When you reserve a ticket on moviepass.com it adds the necessary funds to your debit card and then you pay for the ticket at the theater with the debit card as if you were using a credit card to pay.
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
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#24
I am fully expecting this to fall on its face by December. Tech issues keeping funds from dispersing in time. Theaters not accepting it. That sort of thing. But I will enjoy it until then.

I'm also irritated that I can't see what theaters accept MoviePass without registering. And can you only buy one pass per credit card?
 

Bill Lehecka

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#25
I am fully expecting this to fall on its face by December. Tech issues keeping funds from dispersing in time. Theaters not accepting it. That sort of thing. But I will enjoy it until then.

I'm also irritated that I can't see what theaters accept MoviePass without registering. And can you only buy one pass per credit card?
I was able to see via the app before registering. I know pretty much every Regal accepts it. AMC does too, until they won't since they don't seem happy about this new development.
 
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