My computer randomly take forever to boot up.

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
10,309
2,650
586
#1
Normally, it takes less than a minute for my XP system to get to the password screen. Every once in a while it takes a good 6-7 minutes for it to get that far. I just shutdown, at some point an error message comes up (I'll have to try and remember what it is for future reference), and then I reboot with everything being fine.

It seems to happen the first time I boot my computer after midnight, but that could be my imagination.

I'm running Norton 360, with all the updates, and I've run the program several times so I'm fairly sure it isn't a virus or spyware. I hope.

Any suggestions? Other than lighting my computer on fire and dancing around it in a loincloth.
 

pure_waves

© Steven Carr Industries, 2014. Grrrrrrrr
Dec 9, 2004
1,406
1
513
Upper West Side, NY
#2
im just a novice, but try this. go to run, then type in msconfig. and hit ok. look under the startup tab. are you running alot of programs on startup? that could be the reason for the problems.

for example my pc starts 4 programs on boot up, and it starts up relatively fast. but when i first took the comp out of the box, there must have been 40 programs starting, made it buggy and very slow.
 

Blue Heeler

Uber Listener / Asshole
Aug 24, 2007
15,956
1
126
KY
#4
Norton sucks life from your PC, you're better off uninstalling that spyware and use something less consuming. AVG or PC-cillin are more gooder.
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
40,284
7,454
438
The Inland Empire State
#5
How's the heat inside the case? Also, not to panic you, but your hard drive could going. When's the last time you ran scandisk and/or defrag?

Here's a great little utility that allows you to delay certain programs from loading so you don't have to wait for a complete boot to check the internet.

http://www.winpatrol.com/whyplus.html?index
 

Fr. Dougal

Registered User
Feb 17, 2004
5,853
0
216
#6
You say it's intermittent, so this might not be a problem... but check to see how many services are set to Automatic.

I made nearly all of mine either disabled or start-on-demand. It sped my boot up to 20-30 seconds.

There used to be a great site for analyzing services.
http://www.blackviper.com/WinXP/servicecfg.htm
Not sure if it's still updated that often though.
 
Feb 3, 2006
826
0
0
Pennsylvania
#7
Mine does the same thing. If I shut it down and restart it everything goes fine til just before the password page and then it stops. Just a black screen. I have to power down about 3-4 times before it seems to catch on and finally log on to the password page. My son says my hard drive is probably going but it's only about 2 years old. I have an external hard drive that's a terabite(sp) but don't really know how to copy the internal hard drive over. How long has this been happening to yours? Mines been about 6months now. As a results, I rarely shut it down and leave it on all the time.
 

jsc315

AnalCunt
Dec 8, 2004
2,022
50
313
Evergreen Park,IL
#8
reformat an install windows again. thats if you have the disc. I reformat most of my computers every 1-2 years. They get a bit sluggish after a a while.
 

jsc315

AnalCunt
Dec 8, 2004
2,022
50
313
Evergreen Park,IL
#9
Mine does the same thing. If I shut it down and restart it everything goes fine til just before the password page and then it stops. Just a black screen. I have to power down about 3-4 times before it seems to catch on and finally log on to the password page. My son says my hard drive is probably going but it's only about 2 years old. I have an external hard drive that's a terabite(sp) but don't really know how to copy the internal hard drive over. How long has this been happening to yours? Mines been about 6months now. As a results, I rarely shut it down and leave it on all the time.
Usually hard dives don't slow that fast. usually you would notice it within the first six months if its a bad drive. there are occasions though that dives only last a few years. It's rare but it does happen. If your having problems with your dive get spinrite I haven't had it fail on me yet. This is usually only for bad dives or ones that wont boot up and you need to get your data off of. Re formating the dive is probably the easiest way to solve this. After some time Pc's get cluttered with junk and just sometimes have stuff it does not need on it and it can slow it down considerably.
 
Feb 3, 2006
826
0
0
Pennsylvania
#10
Usually hard dives don't slow that fast. usually you would notice it within the first six months if its a bad drive. there are occasions though that dives only last a few years. It's rare but it does happen. If your having problems with your dive get spinrite I haven't had it fail on me yet. This is usually only for bad dives or ones that wont boot up and you need to get your data off of. Re formating the dive is probably the easiest way to solve this. After some time Pc's get cluttered with junk and just sometimes have stuff it does not need on it and it can slow it down considerably.
Went to the spinrite site. Sorry for being dumb but what exactly does this do, in english, and how would you use it. Thanks
 

jsc315

AnalCunt
Dec 8, 2004
2,022
50
313
Evergreen Park,IL
#11
pinRite works by obtaining low-level access to storage devices. This access allows SpinRite to detect and fix serious problems on x86 systems (and on the Macintosh, when its storage is temporarily relocated or accessed via a PC). The application goes far beyond looking at file integrity, which is where applications like Windows ScanDisk focus primarily. In addition to warning users about problems before they occur, SpinRite can examine and repair defects in the magnetic media itself -- and even attempt to recover data lost because of a media defect. SpinRite also restores diskettes.

Another key feature of SpinRite is that it's unlikely to damage data in the process of recovering it. Defects in a particular area of a drive are addressed only after the program has "lifted" all the data from that area for safekeeping. Once the damaged areas have been identified, the "good" data is returned to safe portions of the drive. That way, there's a far lower likelihood that good data is lost when SpinRite marks the damaged areas as unusable.

Version 6.0 debuted last year and supports FAT, NTFS, Linux, Novell, and a number of other file systems, as well as multi-OS drives and unformatted disks.

Installation and Usage
Since SpinRite needs full access to a system, it needs to be booted off a floppy disk or CD. Fortunately, SpinRite's download comes with easy-to-navigate menus to help you fabricate a start-up floppy or to make an ISO image, which you can burn into a CD using third-party software.

SpinRite uses FreeDOS to start up from either. The opening screen from SpinRite's Web site is seen here:

Of course, you may have to force your system to boot from your floppy in BIOS. At present, SpinRite doesn't support USB drives when booting from floppy unless you manually add DOS drivers to the disk; that ability, too, is likely to be further addressed in an upcoming version.

After booting, you'll be presented with SpinRite's splash screen, during which application checks your system's hard drives to ascertain if Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T.) has been turned on in BIOS. An enhancement often found in today's hard drives, S.M.A.R.T. technology records hard drive errors and is able to predict hard drive failures about three-quarters of the time. SpinRite uses that data, if available, in its analysis if your hard drives, combined with other data that it gathers.

In this photo, in the lower right-hand corner, note the Detailed Technical Log showing specific hard drive findings.


SpinRite offers five areas of activity, dubbed "Levels." The one you're likely to use most often is Level 2, which is designed for preventive maintenance. This provides basic testing features, and depending on the size of your drive, can take several hours for modern drives with gigabyte capacity in the triple digits. According to the documentation, SpinRite works at a theoretical maximum of about 120GB per hour, although a drive's defects, lack of Ultra DMA support, or external configuration can slow its work.

Fortunately, you can save your progress during a scan and restore at a later time.

However, should SpinRite detect the need for repair because of data write/reading errors, the application will then begin working at Level 4 to fix the problems and recover data.

Level 4 is an intensive, painstaking procedure. As the application works to restore data, sometimes bit-by-bit, the process can take hours -- even longer than a day for severely damaged drives. SpinRite also has a Level 5, which will alert you prior to your hard drive failing. Sometimes, a Level 5 alert will be correctable in Level 4 maintenance.

SpinRite has a built in screen saver as it works, as well as other types of displays of it's progress. If your hard drive provides temperature readings, then SpinRite will also report this information as well during testing. Temperature may indeed rise as SpinRite tries to recover data.

Below is the ‘Level 5' screen was selected and settings are changed herein:


While SpinRite works, one of the options available for viewing is called "DynaStat Data Recovery." This graphic represents data recovery down to a particular bit level.
Large drive, and/or slower read/write drive times, require lengthier SpinRite sessions.

Conclusion
SpinRite isn't especially inexpensive: For new users, the product is $89. Owners of earlier versions are charged between $29 and $69, depending on their version.

Nevertheless, the $89 I paid for SpinRite v6.0 proved some of my best-spent money. Of course, there are those who don't purchase SpinRite for preventative maintenance, but rather wait until after the "horse is out of the barn." Why? Who knows? SpinRite has already saved my bacon at least once -- by fixing a back-up hard drive.

I wonder how many users do not take efforts to maintain their computers' sensitive files, instead leaving their documents' fate to the whims of their whirring hard drives. SpinRite will check your systems' hard drive(s) as well as recover data therein -- regardless of the operating system flavor used. To me, it's a sound investment.

Product quality is also worth considering while you're weighing shelling out for SpinRight. SpinRite author Steve Gibson has long been especially dedicated to product development. With Version 6.0, he spent months subjecting the program to intensive real-world testing while incorporating suggestions from beta testers into new builds. That effort shows in the finished product: SpinRite does its job solidly, in spite of having to support a staggering array of possible hard drive configurations and system idiosyncrasies -- ranging from "off-the-shelf" desktops and laptops to custom-built systems of all vintages.

While some users might feel challenged by the mouse-free, DOS-only interface, or the intentional lack of a product demo, product service is superlative (available from the news.grc.com newsgroup and e-mail) and Gibson offers a 30-day, money-back guarantee with no questions asked. New users should never be forced to endure the nail-biting too common in trying new products, and Gibson apparently desires the same thing.
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Sorry that this is very long. I know this is very geeky and some of it you may not understand, but i went into as much detail as i possibly could without leaving anything out. Also here is a PDF of everything you need to know about spinrite. Hope this helps.
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
Donator
Mar 30, 2006
69,623
5,081
568
Wyoming
#13
Norton sucks life from your PC, you're better off uninstalling that spyware and use something less consuming. AVG or PC-cillin are more gooder.
This is the best advice in the whole thread. Norton is worse than the shit it tries to find.
 

cknight725

Wackbag Biblical Scholar
Sep 9, 2005
1,689
0
0
Albuq., NM
#15
reformat an install windows again. thats if you have the disc. I reformat most of my computers every 1-2 years. They get a bit sluggish after a a while.
... and do yourself a favor and blast that Norton CD with a shotgun. Avast or BitDefender are far better solutions without all the bloatware. XP with SP2, Avast, and behind a NAT firewalled router are all you need to be secure.

Longest I have gone with XP is 24 months without an OS reload. I use ***Torrent too much.

If your PC is on a Win2000 or Win2k3 AD Domain my advice might be a little different ...
 

jsc315

AnalCunt
Dec 8, 2004
2,022
50
313
Evergreen Park,IL
#16
Avast is fine, but the updates are slow. Nod32 is much better. I prefer a router and you don't really need to have an anti-virus and a router.
 

Hey_Asshole

Man, Beer, Wild
Feb 21, 2007
3,482
0
0
TRueWDT
#17
If it only doesn't every now and then, it could be windows xp installing updates. Do you have automatic updates turned on. I know I have been getting lots of updates lately. They install automatically during start up and shut downs.