NASA names astronauts on first commercial flights / SpaceX Will Be Ready to Transport Humans in April 2019

mr. sin

Registered User
Mar 30, 2005
27,381
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643
RALEIGH, NC
#1
live feed of the naming

http://www.reuters.tv/l/PY$e


https://futurism.com/crewed-test-nasa-spacex-boeing/

PRIVATE/PUBLIC PARTNERSHIP. NASA wants to stop relying on Russia to get American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). And little by little, SpaceX is making that happen.

Back in 2014, the U.S. agreed to pay Elon Musk’s aerospace company SpaceX $2.6 billion for a spacecraft that could carry the nation’s astronauts into orbit. It struck the same deal with Boeing, to the tune of $4.2 billion.

Since then, both projects have repeatedly delayed their launch dates. But we might finally have some that are definite (or, you know, as definite as these things can be).

SAVE THE DATE. On Thursday, NASA announced that SpaceX’s Crew Dragon (its spacecraft designed to transport astronauts) will be ready for an uncrewed test in November 2018 and a crewed test in April 2019. Boeing’s comparable CST-100 Starliner, meanwhile, will be ready for an uncrewed test in late 2018/early 2019 and a crewed test in mid-2019, according to NASA.

Following the crewed tests, each craft will undergo NASA’s certification process. If those go well, the crafts can then achieve their primary purpose: transport U.S. astronauts to the ISS.

ISS OR BUST. This delayed timeframe isn’t entirely unexpected. In July, the Government Accounting Office (GAO), an independent agency that investigates federal spending for Congress, released a report predicting that SpaceX would complete its certification process in February 2020; Boeing is likely to wrap it up a month earlier.

So, these dates aren’t surprising, but they also aren’t good news.
 

mr. sin

Registered User
Mar 30, 2005
27,381
14,098
643
RALEIGH, NC
#2
NASA’s Commercial Crew Program Target Test Flight Dates


The next generation of American spacecraft and rockets that will launch astronauts to the International Space Station are nearing the final stages of development and evaluation. NASA’s Commercial Crew Program will return human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil, providing safe, reliable and cost-effective access to low-Earth orbit on systems that meet our safety and mission requirements. To meet NASA’s requirements, the commercial providers must demonstrate that their systems are ready to begin regular flights to the space station. Two of those demonstrations are uncrewed flight tests, known as Orbital Flight Test for Boeing, and Demo-1 for SpaceX. After the uncrewed flight tests, both companies will execute a flight test with crew prior to being certified by NASA for crew rotation missions. The following schedule reflects the most recent publicly releasable dates for both providers.


Targeted Test Flight Dates:
Boeing Orbital Flight Test (uncrewed): late 2018 / early 2019
Boeing Crew Flight Test (crewed): mid-2019
SpaceX Demo-1 (uncrewed): November 2018
SpaceX Demo-2 (crewed): April 2019
 

LiddyRules

I'm Gonna Be The Bestest Pilot In The Whole Galaxy
Jun 1, 2005
141,646
49,906
644
#3
live feed of the naming

http://www.reuters.tv/l/PY$e


https://futurism.com/crewed-test-nasa-spacex-boeing/

PRIVATE/PUBLIC PARTNERSHIP. NASA wants to stop relying on Russia to get American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). And little by little, SpaceX is making that happen.

Back in 2014, the U.S. agreed to pay Elon Musk’s aerospace company SpaceX $2.6 billion for a spacecraft that could carry the nation’s astronauts into orbit. It struck the same deal with Boeing, to the tune of $4.2 billion.

Since then, both projects have repeatedly delayed their launch dates. But we might finally have some that are definite (or, you know, as definite as these things can be).

SAVE THE DATE. On Thursday, NASA announced that SpaceX’s Crew Dragon (its spacecraft designed to transport astronauts) will be ready for an uncrewed test in November 2018 and a crewed test in April 2019. Boeing’s comparable CST-100 Starliner, meanwhile, will be ready for an uncrewed test in late 2018/early 2019 and a crewed test in mid-2019, according to NASA.

Following the crewed tests, each craft will undergo NASA’s certification process. If those go well, the crafts can then achieve their primary purpose: transport U.S. astronauts to the ISS.

ISS OR BUST. This delayed timeframe isn’t entirely unexpected. In July, the Government Accounting Office (GAO), an independent agency that investigates federal spending for Congress, released a report predicting that SpaceX would complete its certification process in February 2020; Boeing is likely to wrap it up a month earlier.

So, these dates aren’t surprising, but they also aren’t good news.
Too early to say RIP to the brave souls who died aboard the Space Dragon?
 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
15,014
4,524
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South Jersey
#5
Elon Musk quoted as saying "you have to incinerate a lot of eggs before you make an omelette".