New Ministry of Defence Aircraft Helmet makes Plane 'invisible'

Grem

Enjoying life one T-Cell at a time.
Oct 4, 2006
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#1


The developmental pilot helmet for the highly advanced F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is currently being evaluated by defence scientists at Boscombe Down in Wiltshire.


In 2001 the Government selected the Joint Strike Fighter to meet the requirement for a stealthy multi-role fighter to operate from the future aircraft carriers, replacing the Harriers.

Unlike modern fast jet aircraft the Joint Strike Fighter, which is planned to replace the famous Harrier, does not have a ‘traditional’ head-up display – instead the computerised symbology is displayed directly onto the pilot’s visors.

This Helmet Mounted Display System provides the pilot with cues for flying, navigating and fighting the aircraft. It will even superimpose infra-red imagery onto the visor which allows the pilot to ‘look through’ the cockpit floor at night and see the world below.

Royal Air Force Squadron Leader Rob Harrison, who was one of the pilots who took part in the subjective assessment tests, flying in a Hawk aircraft at Boscombe Down said:

"It cannot be stressed how important this sort of evaluation is to the Joint Strike Fighter Programme. The helmet is a critical piece of equipment and simply has to work."

"It cannot be stressed how important this sort of evaluation is to the Joint Strike Fighter Programme. The helmet is a critical piece of equipment and simply has to work."

Squadron Leader Rob Harrison

The helmet programme is being evaluated by the MOD’s DE&S Joint Combat Aircraft Integrated Project Team along with the RAF’s Centre for Aviation Medicine. The developmental head gear is manufactured by Vision Systems International and Helmet Integrated Systems Limited.

The highly advanced Joint Strike Fighter, which is being built by Lockheed Martin, is planned to replace the RAF and RN’s Harriers.

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on the next phase of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) programme was signed on 12 December 2006 by then Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Lord Drayson, following a meeting with US Deputy Secretary of Defence, Gordon England, in Washington DC.
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...stics/NewCombatHelmetIsAVisionOfTheFuture.htm
 
Jul 13, 2006
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Arkansas
#2
Wait, the UK still uses the Harriers? I don't even think anyone in our forces still use those things except for the Marines on a limited basis.
 

Budyzir

There's nothing quite like a shorn scrotum.
Nov 12, 2004
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#3
We are Borg, resistance is futile.
 

BCH

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Wackbag Staff
Jun 9, 2005
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#5
Wait, the UK still uses the Harriers? I don't even think anyone in our forces still use those things except for the Marines on a limited basis.
Marines fly the AV8-B II Harrier Plus which is a much much improved version of the Harrier Jump Jet built under license by Boeing. Nothing works quite as well for close air support from unimproved runways close to the front lines. The USMC is hoping the JSF will fill the bill.

This version is more stable in hover and more immune to Hot Gas Ingestion which was a problem for pilots of the original Harrier.

The STOVL Version of the JSF however is completely immune as it uses a vertical lift fan.
 

abudabit

New Wackbag
Oct 10, 2004
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Why not? It's inefficient to invent the JSF twice. Unless it has exploitable holes I wouldn't mind seeing all of NATO use it. And Japan and South Korea.