New robot beats humans in rock, paper, scissors 100% of the time

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
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#1
video at link, squeaky and creepy

This article was posted on 07/02/2012.

New robot beats humans in rock, paper, scissors 100% of the time

There’s no tricking this bot — it’s too quick to beat
BY JEFFREY BAUSCH

In a move that no doubt brings us one step closer to the day when robots take over the world, developers out of Japan’s Ishikawa Oku Lab (University of Tokyo) have created a robot hand that is able to defeat humans 100% of the time in the game Rock, Paper, Scissors.

Tally up another point for bots everywhere in the ongoing robot vs human battle.

Whether they’re swimming across an ocean, learning how to adjust their grip based on new sensor technology, or flying in formation to construct buildings, there’s something new in the wide world of robotics nearly every day of the week.

But what good does this bot actually serve?

According to the folks at Ishikawa, apparently a lot.

You see, the robot uses a high-speed camera to recognize the shape that the human hand is making. How long does it take to recognize the hand movement? All of a millisecond. It then adjusts its hand to counter the human’s choice with the appropriate hand-shaped weaponry to win the match-up. And how long does it take to adjust its hand you ask? Another millisecond.

Two milliseconds. That’s all!


The robot uses a high-speed camera to recognize human hand movement and react instantly.

As a matter of fact, the bot reacts so quickly that humans cannot recognize the fact that it is technically cheating. See for yourself in the video below: the robot looks like it’s playing an honest game and throwing down its hand selection at the same time as its human counterpart.

The reason why the team considers this an important development can be understood in the name they chose to give it: the “human-machine cooperation system” (an odd choice of wording, what with the fact that the thing is technically cheating). They went with this title because the technology is the first to truly demonstrate how a robot and human can interact with one another without there being any time delay.

I’m not entirely sold, though, so what do you think — is this one step forward for the robotics industry, or two steps back? ■

Story and images via: Ishikawa Oku Laboratory
http://www2.electronicproducts.com/...ticle-fajb_robot_rock_paper_jul2012-html.aspx
 

Voodoo Ben

You gotta wash your ass
Dec 5, 2010
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#2
this is the beginning of Skynet.
 
Dec 9, 2004
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Baton Rouge
#4
Even if it waits a millisecond after the human starts to throw theirs, it's cheating. You aren't supposed to look at the other person's hand.
 

CaffeeDiva

Registered User
Feb 14, 2012
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#5
Even if it waits a millisecond after the human starts to throw theirs, it's cheating. You aren't supposed to look at the other person's hand.
They acknowledge that in the article, it's just that the technology is amazing for being able to interpret the hand in a millisecond and react in another, so to the eye there is no cheating. It means that it can't REALLY beat you in rock/paper/scissors by cheating, but it might in a boxing match.

Edit to add: Can they oil that fucking thing?
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#6
Even if it waits a millisecond after the human starts to throw theirs, it's cheating. You aren't supposed to look at the other person's hand.
Bullshit, that's part of the game. Reading the body language of your opponent is essential.
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
15,776
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#7
I could beat it. Just go with rock every time. Good old rock, nothing beats that.