New York Police Release Data Showing Rise in Number of Stops on Streets

KRSOne

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hj
By AL BAKER

Published: May 12, 2012


Police officers stopped people on New York City’s streets more than 200,000 times during the first three months of 2012, putting the Bloomberg administration on course to shatter a record set last year for the highest annual tally of street stops.

Data on the 203,500 street stops from January through March — up from 183,326 during the same quarter a year earlier — was sent to the City Council from 1 Police Plaza late on Friday under a legal requirement spawned by public outrage over the 1999 fatal police shooting in the Bronx of Amadou Diallo, an unarmed black street peddler.

On Saturday, the department disclosed the information to reporters and credited the controversial topic known as “Stop, Question, Frisk” as one of several policies of engagement whose effectiveness was vindicated by a decline in homicides in New York.
So far this year, 129 people have been murdered in New York through Friday, the 132nd day of the year, a number that put the city on track for a new low in annual homicides. The 471 murders logged by the Police Department in 2009 was the lowest annual tally for any previous 12-month period since reliable numbers were kept in the early 1960s.

Still, the new street-stop numbers got a fresh round of criticism after a week that saw civil libertarians and prospective mayoral candidates debating the crime-suppression value of such stops and blaming the tactics for tearing at the fabric of city life, particularly in minority neighborhoods, during a period of historically low violence.

On Wednesday, the New York Civil Liberties Union issued a study of last year’s stop data, arguing that far too many innocent people were suffering under the policy. The study said that while young black and Hispanic men made up 4.7 percent of the city’s population, those between the ages of 14 and 24 accounted for 41.6 percent of stops in 2011.
On Saturday, the City Council speaker, Christine C. Quinn, said the “dramatic increase” in stops underscored her calls for reform.

“While the N.Y.P.D. should continue to have the ability to stop and frisk people where there is a reasonable suspicion of criminal activity, I remain convinced that with better monitoring, supervision and accountability we can avoid the corrosive impact of a poorly targeted program,” Ms. Quinn said in a statement. “We cannot continue to stop, question and frisk nearly 700,000 New Yorkers in this way without doing harm to the relationship between police officers and the people they are protecting, particularly in communities of color.”

And the city’s public advocate, Bill de Blasio, said that while the rise in stops seemed a product of a numbers-driven police culture, he proposed more routine use of the department’s own auditing of those statistics to track the outcomes for each stop-and-frisk episode, like whether someone is then arrested.

“The record number of unwarranted stops is widening the rift between police and the communities whose cooperation we need to fight crime,” Mr. de Blasio said in a statement. “Make no mistake — this is the result of City Hall aggressively pushing precinct commanders to use stop and frisk beyond what is necessary and effective. It’s time to bring these numbers back to earth.”

Both Ms. Quinn and Mr. de Blasio are expected to run for mayor.
Peppered with questions at a news conference on Friday, Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly said that critics of the street-stop tactics “never have an answer” about how to tackle the disproportionate levels of crime in certain city neighborhoods. The department, by contrast, is always looking for answers to “slow down” crime.
“I would submit that our strategies are saving lives,” Mr. Kelly said.
He added: “You look at the numbers in this city; you look at the lives that we’re saving, and I would submit to you that the majority of those lives are minorities, and most of them are young men who are being killed for senseless reasons. We are saving those lives, and, quite frankly, we’re saving them at a much greater degree and extent than other cities are.”

Last year, there were 685,724 stop-and-frisk encounters, the highest total in the 10 years the department has reported the data. The annual total has gradually increased, from a low of 97,296 in 2002, according to departmental statistics.........
 

KRSOne

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We will make you a safe target for criminals by taking away your 2nd amendment rights and then we will take away your 4th amendment rights to make you safe from the criminals.... but then the police become the ones that are violating your rights and not the common street thug.
 

fletcher

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Dont you ever take a day off?
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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#4
Mom told him to stay out of her hair on her special day today. So he has to come here and bother us.
 

fletcher

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I wonder if she is getting black out drunk out of regret for spawning the little troof spreader.
 

Psychopath

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#6
Oh, look it's this thread again. Some one should study history, it was way worse in the past, the police now are mere puppy dogs to what they were 20 years ago. 100 years ago they were stopping people just for mere shake downs and about 80 percent of the police force were corrupt. I would rather have the cops of today than the ones of the past.
 

Creasy Bear

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#7
Police officers stopped black people on New York City’s streets more than 200,000 times during the first three months of 2012, putting the Bloomberg administration on course to shatter a record set last year for the highest annual tally of street stops.
Insert that one little detail they omitted, and the outrage!(tm) melts away.
 

Mags

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Insert that one little detail they omitted, and the outrage!(tm) melts away.
Exactly. Worked in NYC 30 years and lived here about 15.
Never been stopped.

I see zero problems with "stop and frisk".
 

Norm Stansfield

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#10
On Saturday, the department disclosed the information to reporters and credited the controversial topic known as “Stop, Question, Frisk” as one of several policies of engagement whose effectiveness was vindicated by a decline in homicides in New York.
The department might want to purchase one of them books about Logic, and look up the difference between correlation and causation.
 

Norm Stansfield

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#11
Oh, look it's this thread again. Some one should study history, it was way worse in the past, the police now are mere puppy dogs to what they were 20 years ago. 100 years ago they were stopping people just for mere shake downs and about 80 percent of the police force were corrupt. I would rather have the cops of today than the ones of the past.
Yes, but about 150 years ago they would've been shot for it. So maybe the problem is what happened 100 years ago.
 

mikeybot

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#12
On Wednesday, the New York Civil Liberties Union issued a study of last year’s stop data, arguing that far too many innocent people were suffering under the policy. The study said that while young black and Hispanic men made up 4.7 percent of the city’s population, those between the ages of 14 and 24 accounted for 41.6 percent of stops in 2011.
Hmm, I wonder what percentage of crime is committed by young black and Hispanic men?
 

KRSOne

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#13
Look at all the trendies that are more than happy to give up privacy rights because it makes them feel "safe".
 

Madness

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#14
Nationally. Black men account for 49% of the homicides in the country.
 

Madness

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Look at all the trendies that are more than happy to give up privacy rights because it makes them feel "safe".
Because it works stupid. I live in a small suburb outside of a big city. Cops are on the streets all the time and guess what, there's almost zero crime in my neighborhood and they keep the stupid teenagers in line. Guess who's never been bothered once by said police the entire time he's lived there... ME.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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Of all the places in the country to accuse the police of being overzealous and violating rights, New York is probably the last one on the list. If you want to find stories of abuse of power, just go to small towns where there is no real crime. The cops in some of those places think they're Marines.
 

KRSOne

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Because it works stupid. I live in a small suburb outside of a big city. Cops are on the streets all the time and guess what, there's almost zero crime in my neighborhood and they keep the stupid teenagers in line. Guess who's never been bothered once by said police the entire time he's lived there... ME.
Well keep it out of my town. I'm not a scared little bitch, like you. I would rather have the right to defend myself against the common street thug instead of being subjected to random searches by government sanctioned gangs on the street.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
 

the Streif

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Well, I'm sure he's been at his barista job long enough that he has seniority and can have Sundays off now.
I didn't know that Starbucks hired people under the age of 4. How does one prepare a half-caf simlilac with a touch of Madagascar cinnamon?
 

mikeybot

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#19
I'm not a scared little bitch, like you. I would rather have the right to defend myself against the common street thug instead of being subjected to random searches by government sanctioned gangs on the street.


Says the guy living in a state with the ethnic diversity of Norway.

How did you make out in tips this week coffee boy?
 

caniseeyourtaint

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#20
Well keep it out of my town. I'm not a scared little bitch, like you. I would rather have the right to defend myself against the common street thug instead of being subjected to random searches by government sanctioned gangs on the street.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Uhh...you do realize trolls and hobgoblins aren't 'street thugs', right? There's a real live world without those heinous monsters out there. Step from behind the computer and come up and outside. But don't forget to ask mommy first.
 

KRSOne

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Says the guy living in a state with the ethnic diversity of Norway.

How did you make out in tips this week coffee boy?
If I lived in NJ or NY I would feel a bigger need to have the ability to protect myself, not less. I guess you just have bigger faith in the phone and cops.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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If I lived in NJ or NY I would feel a bigger need to have the ability to protect myself, not less. I guess you just have bigger faith in the phone and cops.
You do realize New York City is the safest city of its size in the world, right?
 

Madness

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Well keep it out of my town. I'm not a scared little bitch, like you. I would rather have the right to defend myself against the common street thug instead of being subjected to random searches by government sanctioned gangs on the street.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
That's cute. I have my CCW and I own several guns and have my home defense plan set up. Just because of that doesn't mean I want to go off all Billy Badass and have someone else's blood on my hands justified or not. Let the cops do what they get paid for. My shit doesn't get vandalized by punks and the undesirables go to neighborhoods with less active police.
 

KRSOne

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That's cute. I have my CCW and I own several guns and have my home defense plan set up. Just because of that doesn't mean I want to go off all Billy Badass and have someone else's blood on my hands justified or not. Let the cops do what they get paid for. My shit doesn't get vandalized by punks and the undesirables go to neighborhoods with less active police.
CCW? You obviously don't live in NY or NJ, what state are you in where the cops can search you for no reason?
 

KRSOne

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You do realize New York City is the safest city of its size in the world, right?
So you're saying the entire country should be a nanny/police state like NY and NJ? Why don't you just move to China if that's what you're looking for.