NYC elects commie, again. Point and laugh harder folks

Discoman

Well-Known Member
Donator
At a time when literally everyone has a camera phone and could constitute as a journalist with stupid blog sites. I'm sure this won't protect Milo and other undesirables the next time they get swarmed at a public appearance.
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
Maybe I missed something but I always thought assault wasn't legal.
More useless laws to criminalize something that's already a crime.
Yes, but I would believe that simple assault is a misdemeanor and Cuomo wants to make it a felony to even touch a journalist it seems. He’ll get it passed in NY because there is literally no congressional opposition for Dems in NYS anymore. And yes, I wouldn’t expect charges to be applied equally, much like hate crimes. But I can’t imagine this is in any way constitutional. But NY doesn’t care. I suppose the arguement would be “the police have special protections as do the military so we can decree that Journalism is a protected occupation”. I guess on second thought, you might be able to pull that off in a SC case.
 

Ballbuster1

In The Danger Zone...
Wackbag Staff
Yes, but I would believe that simple assault is a misdemeanor and Cuomo wants to make it a felony to even touch a journalist it seems.
Oh I got that but it's still a crime in the 1st place. Making it a felony is just
like "hate crime" bullshit. It is a crime and should be treated as such no matter
who gets assaulted. A crime is a crime is a crime. Useless legislation.
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
Oh I got that but it's still a crime in the 1st place. Making it a felony is just
like "hate crime" bullshit. It is a crime and should be treated as such no matter
who gets assaulted. A crime is a crime is a crime. Useless legislation.
Exactly and it’s another fuck you to Trump since he put all these Journalists lives in danger.

Also how would it work if you shove a journalist that gets in your personal space. Like that dude who got decked by that congressman in Montana
 
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Mayor de Blasio Says Wealth Is ‘in the Wrong Hands,’ Pledges to Redistribute It




In his State of the City address, Mayor Bill de Blasio is aiming at a bigger, if unnamed, target: the nation’s political and economic system.

Taking aim at the everyday tribulations and injustices of life in the United States, Mayor Bill de Blasio used his sixth State of the City speech to present his tenure in New York City and his promises of things to come as the alternative.

The hourlong address on Thursday followed a vow by the mayor earlier in the week that he would embark on a national tour to “preach the gospel” of liberal governance, trumpet his accomplishments in his first five years in office and argue that his new proposals — such as requiring paid vacation for most private-sector employees — are a model for the Democratic Party nationally.

He spoke against a campaign-style backdrop of seated supporters in a relatively small Manhattan theater that was filled to capacity, giving the event a heightened energy that previous addresses had lacked. Mr. de Blasio railed against big business, promised to seize the buildings of scofflaw landlords and pointedly framed the argument over income inequality — long a theme of his rhetoric as mayor — in zero-sum terms.

“Here’s the truth, brothers and sisters, there’s plenty of money in the world. Plenty of money in this city,” the mayor said, flanked by screens with graphs of productivity outpacing compensation. “It’s just in the wrong hands!”

In the speech, Mr. de Blasio presented his mayoralty as one that has made streets safer and brought new protections for tenants and workers. He cast himself as an aspiring Robin Hood — aiming to take from the rich and give to the poor — even as he has thus far been unsuccessful in his many attempts to raise taxes on high earners.

Major elements of the speech had been set out by Mr. de Blasio in recent days: a plan to improve customer service for the city’s public hospitals and better connect uninsured residents to primary care physicians; and legislation to require paid vacation for private-sector workers.

Others were new, if somewhat less grand. The ferry system would expand to include new routes to Staten Island and Coney Island. The city would create a program to help workers save for retirement, if the companies they work for do not offer savings plans.

Mr. de Blasio tiptoed around some of the thornier challenges of his administration, such as the soaring number of homeless and the city’s scandal-plagued and deteriorating public housing system, which he mentioned once and appeared to promise more than he could deliver. “The New York City Housing Authority has a plan to bring brand-new everything to 175,000 Nycha residents,” he said.

The mayor also did not mention that he had secured the promise of 25,000 jobs by reaching a deal two months ago to bring Amazon offices to Queens, even though a pledge to bring 100,000 good-paying jobs to New York City was a centerpiece of his 2017 address. The deal to lure Amazon to New York City, at a cost of about $3 billion in state and city incentives, is deeply unpopular among some liberals.

The speech, at Symphony Space on the Upper West Side, capped an unusual spurt of activity for the mayor in the early days of 2019.

Since New Year’s Day, Mr. de Blasio has held five news conferences in which he took questions from the media — including ones last week about the census, crime statistics and half-price MetroCards — and made two announcements ahead of his speech that garnered broad attention, on health care and paid vacation.

The MetroCard plan, pushed by the City Council speaker, Corey Johnson, and known as Fair Fares, did not get a mention in the speech, perhaps in part because the city’s initial rollout would only reach about 4 percent of those who could qualify.

“We have to make sure that progressiveness means effectiveness,” Scott M. Stringer, the city’s comptroller, said after the speech.

“I hope, with new programs and new excitement, there’s going to be attention to detail to get some of these things done.”

The mayor’s pledge to seize buildings, which City Hall officials said would require legislation from the City Council and possibly at the state level, met with almost immediate headwinds on Thursday. “The Council has serious concerns about whether or not this is the best approach,” said Jennifer Fermino, Mr. Johnson’s spokeswoman.

The mayor, in his address, continued to aim at a bigger target: the economic agenda of Republicans, from President Ronald Reagan to President Trump, that he said had dominated the nation’s politics.

“This country has spent decades taking from working people and giving to the 1 percent,” he said. “This city has spent the last five years doing it the other way around. We give back to working people the prosperity they have earned.”

The speech concluded: “Those goals are not utopian or unreachable. They are achievable.”

Mr. de Blasio gave the speech at 11 a.m., rather than in the evening as he has done for the past three years. And he used a teleprompter, departing from his recent practice of allowing himself more freedom to improvise by relying only on bullet points for speeches that often ran long.

As he has in the past, the mayor employed rhetoric aimed at showing empathy for struggling New Yorkers who have not benefited from the city’s prosperity — sounding almost like a life coach.

“Are you spending enough time with your kids? Do you have time for that? When was the last time you and your partner could go out on a date?” he said. “Do you see your life getting better this year? Or are you just holding on?”

The questions echoed the tone of a five-minute video that preceded the mayor’s speech, featuring New Yorkers of various backgrounds talking about their struggles and their home lives.

The speech included the usual heralding of city workers who did exceptional work in the past year. The mayor also added a few moments of flair, using video to illustrate some points — like a silent scroll of nations that already require paid vacation — and signing an executive order on stage to create a new office for tenant protection that he said would step up enforcement against landlords.

As he signed the order, Mr. de Blasio punctuated the moment by holding the document aloft to the applauding room. “Who says government can’t act fast?” he said.
Link

Curious how much to you have to make to be considered rich in his eyes? 100k... 200k?
 
They're not even trying to pretend anymore.

They may as well tattoo the hammer and sickle on their foreheads.
Seems 200k is when that local income tax really starts kicking in... which sounds like a lot. But gonna guess not if you live in Manhattan.
 

Mags

A.K.A. Chad
Donator
Seems 200k is when that local income tax really starts kicking in... which sounds like a lot. But gonna guess not if you live in Manhattan.
It’s not. $200k for a couple in Manhattan will barely get you a one bedroom. Ask my tenants.

*i should add, “in a decent, secure building.”
 
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It’s not. $200k for a couple in Manhattan will barely get you a one bedroom. Ask my tenants.

*i should add, “in a decent, secure building.”
Ya I did some tax calculator thing at at filing single at 200k is when that tax went up to damn near 4%. Hey is there a city sales tax on top of state in NYC?
 
8.8% combined, I think.
The City Sales Tax rate is 4.5%, NY State Sales and Use Tax is 4% and the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation District surcharge of 0.375% for a total Sales and Use Tax of 8.875 percent. - Jeebus the MTA just has cash being thrown at it from everywhere.



The no tax on clothing under $110 is telling.
 
NYC is the most financially distressed city in the nation

New York City is officially the most financially distressed metropolis in America, according to local debt counselors and financial analysts.
The city’s credit card delinquency rates and level of bad personal debt are the highest in the nation, which saw household debt and credit soar by $219 billion, or 1.6 percent, to $13.51 trillion, in the third quarter of 2018 — a record $837 billion more than its previous peak in 2008.
Facing an environment of mounting personal bankruptcies and financial meltdowns, unprecedented numbers of local residents are just one paycheck away from total monetary disaster.
The latest surge in toxic debt is blowing a huge hole in New Yorkers’ personal finances, these experts say. Forty percent of Americans recently said they could not cover a $400 emergency — and that proportion may be even higher in New York City, analysts say. “It’s really bad right now,” Kelly Figueroa, a consumer debt counselor in New York at GreenPath, a national nonprofit, told The Post.
“Like the rest of the nation, most New Yorkers are living paycheck to paycheck,” she added. “But in New York, the situation is even worse because of the city’s higher — and rising — cost of living.”
From low-income to highly paid consumers, Kelly says, local clients’ unsecured distressed household debt ranges from an average of $20,000 per individual to as high as $100,000.
Credit card debt troubles in particular have jumped in New York City, from 30 percent of client caseloads at GreenPath to 40 percent in the past few years, even as housing and mortgage stress cases stemming from the financial crisis have ebbed.
New York City is now its No. 1 metro market, followed by Atlanta and Los Angeles, as measured by the sheer volume of distressed consumers seeking assistance and relief, according to Money Management International, a nationwide credit-counseling network.
“New York has the second-most expensive housing market in the US; rents are rising along with interest rates and credit card and other debt, including auto loans,” said Thomas Nitzsche, a consumer debt expert at Money Management International, citing some of the nonprofit’s latest findings.
A large population with average wages well above the national average — and a low unemployment rate — can give residents the courage to take on large credit card balances and debt, analysts say.
However, since 2010, rents in New York City overall have jumped 31 percent — and even as much as 45 percent in some neighborhoods, according to the StreetEasy Rent Index in late 2018.
This may explain why many city consumers are sinking in card and other debt, say analysts.
A New York Fed study shows average credit card balances alone in Manhattan hit $7,400 by 2016, compared with the nation’s $5,400.
Credit card delinquency rates for holders 90 days late on payments reached a stunning 15.1 percent for the Bronx and nearly 10 percent citywide, compared with 8.3 percent nationwide.
Analysts figure those balances and delinquency rates have since ticked up further in New York.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
NYC is the most financially distressed city in the nation

New York City is officially the most financially distressed metropolis in America, according to local debt counselors and financial analysts.
The city’s credit card delinquency rates and level of bad personal debt are the highest in the nation, which saw household debt and credit soar by $219 billion, or 1.6 percent, to $13.51 trillion, in the third quarter of 2018 — a record $837 billion more than its previous peak in 2008.
Facing an environment of mounting personal bankruptcies and financial meltdowns, unprecedented numbers of local residents are just one paycheck away from total monetary disaster.
The latest surge in toxic debt is blowing a huge hole in New Yorkers’ personal finances, these experts say. Forty percent of Americans recently said they could not cover a $400 emergency — and that proportion may be even higher in New York City, analysts say. “It’s really bad right now,” Kelly Figueroa, a consumer debt counselor in New York at GreenPath, a national nonprofit, told The Post.
“Like the rest of the nation, most New Yorkers are living paycheck to paycheck,” she added. “But in New York, the situation is even worse because of the city’s higher — and rising — cost of living.”
From low-income to highly paid consumers, Kelly says, local clients’ unsecured distressed household debt ranges from an average of $20,000 per individual to as high as $100,000.
Credit card debt troubles in particular have jumped in New York City, from 30 percent of client caseloads at GreenPath to 40 percent in the past few years, even as housing and mortgage stress cases stemming from the financial crisis have ebbed.
New York City is now its No. 1 metro market, followed by Atlanta and Los Angeles, as measured by the sheer volume of distressed consumers seeking assistance and relief, according to Money Management International, a nationwide credit-counseling network.
“New York has the second-most expensive housing market in the US; rents are rising along with interest rates and credit card and other debt, including auto loans,” said Thomas Nitzsche, a consumer debt expert at Money Management International, citing some of the nonprofit’s latest findings.
A large population with average wages well above the national average — and a low unemployment rate — can give residents the courage to take on large credit card balances and debt, analysts say.
However, since 2010, rents in New York City overall have jumped 31 percent — and even as much as 45 percent in some neighborhoods, according to the StreetEasy Rent Index in late 2018.
This may explain why many city consumers are sinking in card and other debt, say analysts.
A New York Fed study shows average credit card balances alone in Manhattan hit $7,400 by 2016, compared with the nation’s $5,400.
Credit card delinquency rates for holders 90 days late on payments reached a stunning 15.1 percent for the Bronx and nearly 10 percent citywide, compared with 8.3 percent nationwide.
Analysts figure those balances and delinquency rates have since ticked up further in New York.
If only they'd let Warren double down on everything he's been doing to get NYC to this point, he could fix everything.
 
I'm sure this has nothing to do with it:

According to a 2013 Census Bureau estimate,[6] 45.8% of the Bronx's population was white, 43.3% was black or African American, 4.2% Asian, 3.0% American Indian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, and 3.3% of two or more races. In addition, 54.6% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino origin, of any race.
 
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