OWS: One year later....they still smell.

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
78,418
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#1
Occupy Wall Street marks anniversary, dozens arrested

NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York police on Monday arrested dozens of Occupy Wall Street activists who gathered in the city's financial district, where they sought to disrupt traffic and surround the New York Stock Exchange as part of a day of protests to mark the movement's first anniversary.

The protests attracted about a thousand activists, far fewer than last fall's numbers, highlighting the challenge the movement has faced in trying to sustain momentum after sparking a national conversation about economic inequality last fall.

The New York Police Department, which set up a broad perimeter to block access to the NYSE by anyone other than exchange workers, said it has made "multiple arrests" by midmorning. Police were also posted at major banks and government buildings, and guarded Wall Street' landmark Charging Bull, a 7,100 pound bronze sculpture.

Gideon Orion Oliver, a lawyer who represents a number of protesters and the president of the New York Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, estimated in a Twitter posting that about 90 protesters had been arrested. Among those was retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard, who also was arrested last December.

Occupy Wall Street protesters, who popularized the phrase "We are the 99 percent," gathered early Monday near Zuccotti Park, where a spontaneous encampment became their unofficial headquarters last year, but were again barred access by police.

Several protesters held signs, one saying "END the FED," another reading: "We Are Students, Not Customers."

"What happened here a year ago was a process that cannot be stopped," Pulitzer-prize winning author Chris Hedges said. "What happened here a year ago will ultimately spell the doom of the corporate state."

The grassroots movement caught the world by surprise last fall with a spontaneous encampment in lower Manhattan that soon spread to cities across North America and Europe.

Occupy Wall Street briefly buoyed a spirit of U.S. social activism, and drew attention to economic injustice.

The group sponsored a series of activities over the weekend, attended by crowds that never exceeded the hundreds. New York police arrested about three dozen people at those events.

(Writing by Dan Burns; Editing by Vicki Allen)
http://news.yahoo.com/occupy-wall-s...y-nyse-protest-124710413--finance.html?_esi=1
 
Feb 5, 2003
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#2
Did anyone think this thing would end any other way other than powdering out the way it did? Most of the people protesting appeared to be the type of people who think they're capable of great things but always find a reason to give up on anything that isn't easy or doesn't have an immediate payoff. They all think they're going to have some great story to tell their kids some day as if this "movement" is comparable to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, but the response they're most likely to get from their kids is the same one they get from people now: rolling eyeballs and mockery.

Also, "We are Students, Not Customers" is a stupid sign. First of all, if you have a student loan, yes you are a customer of whoever gave you those loans. Sallie Mae or whatever bank issued the loan doesn't owe you a free education so stop asking for them to forgive your debt. Second of all, if these people weren't so self-centered they'd see that asking Sallie Mae to give out loans without expecting repayment would force them out of business and put thousands of people out of work.
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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#3
Their problem was created by the student loan system. So their solution (as much as they have one) to their problem is doing the exact same thing, just bigger?

Shit, this is the same retard thinking that has us spending twice as much on education for nearly the same results.

When you ignore market forces, market forces work against you. When you intelligently plan for and manipulate market forces, they work for you. Not perfectly, no, but it generally works to your benefit if you take into account enough greed. putting together programs trusting people to be nice and cuddly is why we're where we fucking are.
 

kidconnor

55gallon hog
Mar 16, 2005
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#4
"What happened here a year ago was a process that cannot be stopped," Pulitzer-prize winning author Chris Hedges said. "What happened here a year ago will ultimately spell the doom of the corporate state."
No it won't.... silly pulitzer
 
Feb 5, 2003
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#5
"What happened here a year ago was a process that cannot be stopped," Pulitzer-prize winning author Chris Hedges said. "What happened here a year ago will ultimately spell the doom of the corporate state."
No it won't.... silly pulitzer
Delusional belief in the success and message of OWS? Check. Use of buzwords like "the corporate state?" Check. The only thing his sentence was missing was a "Maaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnnn!" at the end.
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#6
Occupy protesters attempt to ‘shut down’ Wall Street on anniversary
By Liz Goodwin & Dylan Stableford | The Lookout – 3 hrs ago

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An Occupy protester screams as he is arrested near Zuccotti Park, Sept. 17, 2012. (John Minchillo/AP)

More than 100 protesters were arrested in lower Manhattan on Monday during demonstrations marking the first anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, the amorphous, anti-corporate greed movement that began in New York and spread to dozens of cities last year.

Activists vowed to "shut down" Wall Street, with plans to create a human wall and block the entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. Hundreds of New York police officers were assembled early Monday in anticipation of the protests.

Dozens of officers, some on horseback, blocked off the entrance to Wall Street to prevent protesters from carrying out their stated mission. At 10 a.m., the NYPD carted off a bus full of protesters, all of them arrested earlier Monday morning. A double-decker bus of sightseers followed closely behind.

Several of the arrested protesters were in wheelchairs. (One smiled as she was loaded into a police van.) At the intersection of Broad and Water streets in the financial district, activists demonstrated in front of a police truck, raising clenched fists in its direction.

[Slideshow: Occupy Wall Street: One year later]

Matt Tucker, a protester from Cincinnati, told Yahoo News that the Occupy movement has found buildings where protesters can sleep. (Zuccotti Park, once the ground zero of the Occupy movement, is no longer an option for overnight camping.) Others slept in front of Trinity Church and Chase Bank over the weekend as part of their protest.

As is often the case with city-based demonstrations, the number of protesters who showed up Monday to mark the Occupy anniversary varied depending on who was counting. Most media outlets estimated several hundred; one protester's estimate—retweeted by Occupy Wall Street's Twitter account—was 50,000. (The tweet was immediately—and rightly—ridiculed.)

According to the New York Times' City Room blog, about 200 protesters gathered in Zuccotti at 7 a.m. A half hour later, approximately 400 protesters arrived at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Water Street:

The police were also visible in large numbers throughout the area. Just after 7 a.m. four officers on scooters followed four bicyclists dressed as polar bears—to symbolize rising water tables resulting from global warming, they said—on their way to an assembly spot outside the Lower Manhattan ferry terminal.

Police who barricaded Wall Street checked IDs of employees to let them through.

A few protesters used markers to write a telephone number for legal help on their arms should anyone arrested need it. A small band of demonstrators outside the church performed in a drum line. One held a sign that read: "Sorry, Wall Street is Closed Today for Deconstruction."

Some Occupy protesters played drums and marched around behind barricades, even as they were blocked from entering Wall Street. Other splinter groups performed "mic checks" (creating a people's microphone where listeners repeat a speaker's words so others farther away could hear) in the lobbies of major banks, including J.P. Morgan Chase, Citibank and the Bank of America.

The anniversary demonstrations began on Sunday with a concert in Foley Square featuring Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello.
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/occupy-wall-street-anniversary-protests-132831287.html?_esi=1
 

WhiteHonkyDevil

El hombre de los moleculos!
Dec 8, 2004
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#7
One held a sign that read: "Sorry, Wall Street is Closed Today for Deconstruction."


The anniversary demonstrations began on Sunday with a concert in Foley Square featuring Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello.
What a bash that must have been.:rolleyes:
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
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#8
Feb 5, 2003
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#9
You must be new here. I remember some conservards predicting major cities would be burned to the ground by Christmas.
http://www.wackbag.com/showthread.php/138805-Anonymous-Joins-OCCUPYWALLSTREET-9-17-11#post4263275
Oh, I fully expected violence (and was not disappointed). I just also knew that cold weather and the lack of ability to stick with something for any meaningful length of time would result in the crowds getting smaller and smaller until nobody cared about them anymore.
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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#10
Well, let's see: multiple rapes, drug busts, the Cleveland bomb plot losers, etc.

Has anyone yet realized that OWS started in a private park? Owned by a member of the "1%"? Has the irony of the fact that OWS could not start on public land owned by the 99% but had more freedom of expression and more rights when on private land (open to the public, but privately owned land) owned by a very rich person struck anyone yet?
 
Feb 5, 2003
5,543
919
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With a stranger
#11
Well, let's see: multiple rapes, drug busts, the Cleveland bomb plot losers, etc.

Has anyone yet realized that OWS started in a private park? Owned by a member of the "1%"? Has the irony of the fact that OWS could not start on public land owned by the 99% but had more freedom of expression and more rights when on private land (open to the public, but privately owned land) owned by a very rich person struck anyone yet?
Not to mention all the people there using iPhones, Macbooks, etc. Yeah, you're really suffering when you have a laptop that costs about $1,000-$1,500 and the latest iPhone. Then they cried when the police took down the tents (after giving them plenty of warning and time to take the tents down themselves and remove any of their possessions before the police did it) and their precious laptops were damaged. As a general rule, someone who works hard for something nice takes care of that thing. Someone who is handed things over and over doesn't take care of their things because they know they'll be handed a replacement soon enough anyway. If you don't even care enough about your damn laptop to make sure you grab it before the tents get taken down, then you don't take care of your possessions and that leads me to believe that most of those protesters were spoiled little assholes who have been handed everything and still want more. You can't cry that you don't have enough when you have the latest, most-expensive technology and think nothing of letting it get damaged when you were fully capable of preventing it from happening.