Philadelphia had at least 168 noncitizens registered to vote in the city

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Wackbag Staff
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http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201...non-citizens-to-vote-in-pennsylvania.amp.html



Published September 20, 2017
Philadelphia finds hundreds of illegal voters
By Fox News

Dozens of people who are not U.S. citizens were allowed to register to vote due to a glitch in Pennsylvania's electronic driver's license system, a Philadelphia election official said Wednesday.

Al Schmidt, a Republican who sits on Philadelphia's three-member election commission, told reporters that at least 168 noncitizens -- who are legal residents of the U.S. -- had registered to vote in the city through the licensing system.

Philly.com reported that 317 such illegal voters have contacted the commission since 2006 to have their registrations canceled. Of those, Schmidt's office said that 220 were registered to vote from 2006 to 2017. Forty-four voted in one election and 46 voted in more than one election.

"This is a real concern," Schmidt said. "It is harmful to election integrity, and it is harmful to members of the immigrant community who are applying for citizenship. If you've registered to vote in the U.S., and you're not a citizen, it's potential grounds for the denial of your citizenship application."

Schmidt said that many more noncitizens could have mistakenly registered through the system, both in Philadelphia and elsewhere in Pennsylvania. However, he pointed out that no municipal election was close enough to have potentially been affected by improper voting.

Schmidt also said that the cases likely did not rise to the level of voter fraud because of the apparent lack of intent by the registrants.

"All voter fraud is an irregularity; not all voter irregularities are fraud," he said. "Regardless of the intent, the damage is still the same."

The Pennsylvania Department of State said it is working to fix the system and was aware of the problem before Schmidt contacted it in July. A spokeswoman could not immediately say when the department first became aware of the issue.

The department is looking into the total number of mistakenly registered voters and could not provide an estimate, the spokeswoman said.

Last fall, during a legislative hearing on the integrity of the state's voting systems, Secretary of State Pedro Cortes, a Democrat, acknowledged that someone who is not a citizen "may inadvertently register" while getting or updating a driver's license, according to a transcript of the hearing.

Some 6.1 million people voted in Pennsylvania in November's presidential election, including more than 700,000 in Philadelphia. Donald Trump, a Republican, won Pennsylvania; Hillary Clinton, a Democrat, won Philadelphia.

The registration problem stemmed from electronic touch screens in state driver's license centers that were programmed to give users the option to register to vote while getting new or updated licenses. The system showed noncitizens the voter registration option, even though they had already provided information showing that they were not citizens, officials said.

"For the majority of these people, it’s completely plausible to believe they thought they were eligible to vote," Schmidt said.

In August 2016, the department took a step to try to prevent such registrations. It changed the software so that users are immediately asked if they are U.S. citizens. The process stops if a user answers "no," the department said.

It said it is working on creating a new touch-screen system in which a noncitizen would not see the motor voter screens at all, the department said.

The motor voter system may not be the only problem in Pennsylvania. Schmidt said he discovered 52 other noncitizen legal immigrants who registered to vote through other means, including paper voter registration applications. The Department of State is looking into that, as well, the spokeswoman said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
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That’s really not that shocking to me, between the morons that work at the dmv and the people who will do anything to get out of the DMV, I will say that while it’s a little disturbing that non citizens are registered to vote I don’t think it’s a mass conspiracy, just one more example of the ineptitude of government in general.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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Those people who voted better be getting el booto outa hereo...
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
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#5
And I'm sure they all voted a straight Republican ticket.
 

mascan42

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#6
Schmidt also said that the cases likely did not rise to the level of voter fraud because of the apparent lack of intent by the registrants.
You know, I might buy that if they were just accidentally registered, but some of them actually voted. How is that not intent?
 
Dec 8, 2004
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L8r...

Illegal Voting Gets Texas Woman 8 Years in Prison, and Certain Deportation



Ms. Ortega, a native of Monterrey, Mexico, came to Texas with her mother when she was an infant. More than a decade later, the family was scattered after the mother was arrested and deported. Two brothers born in Dallas automatically gained citizenship; Ms. Ortega became a permanent resident and gained a green card, her brother Tony Ortega, 35, said in an interview.
A photograph of Rosa Maria Frito Lay Ortega with her family. She said in court that she had not known she was ineligible to vote and was confused by registration forms and explanations by election officials. Credit Dylan Hollingsworth for The New York Times

Despite repeated statements by Republican political leaders that American elections are rife with illegal voting, credible reports of fraud have been hard to find and convictions rarer still.

That may help explain the unusually heavy penalty imposed on Rosa Maria Ortega, 37, a permanent resident and a mother of four who lives outside Dallas. On Thursday, a Fort Worth judge sentenced her to eight years in prison — and almost certainly deportation later — after she voted illegally in elections in 2012 and 2014.

The sentence for Ms. Ortega, who was brought to this country by her mother as an infant, “shows how serious Texas is about keeping its elections secure,” Ken Paxton, the Texas attorney general, said in a statement. Her lawyer called it an egregious overreaction, made to score political points, against someone who wrongly believed she was eligible to vote.

“She has a sixth-grade education. She didn’t know she wasn’t legal,” said Ms. Ortega’s lawyer, Clark Birdsall, who once oversaw voter fraud prosecutions in neighboring Dallas County. “She can own property; she can serve in the military; she can get a job; she can pay taxes. But she can’t vote, and she didn’t know that.”

The punishment was strikingly harsh for an offense that usually merits far less jail time, if any. A second fraudulent ballot case in metropolitan Fort Worth ended in 2015 with probation.

Continue reading the main story


Ms. Ortega insisted in court that she had been unaware that she was ineligible to vote and was confused by registration forms and explanations by election officials.

Prosecutors for Mr. Paxton and Tarrant County said that she had lied and that the same forms and conversations proved it. A jury convicted her Wednesday of two felony charges.

Mr. Birdsall said Mr. Paxton’s office had been prepared to dismiss all charges against Ms. Ortega if she agreed to testify on voting procedures before the Texas Legislature. But the Tarrant County criminal district attorney, Sharen Wilson, vetoed that deal, he said, insisting on a trial that would showcase her office’s efforts to crack down on election fraud.

Both the attorney general’s office and the county prosecutor declined to comment on the specifics of Mr. Birdsall’s statement, citing privacy rules for plea-bargain negotiations. A spokeswoman for Ms. Wilson, Sam Jordan, said any negotiations were only “discussions,” a description Mr. Birdsall disputed.

Photo


Rosa Maria Ortega’s lawyer, Clark Birdsall, said her sentence was an overreaction made to score political points against someone who wrongly believed she was eligible to vote. Credit Dylan Hollingsworth for The New York Times
Link


A. Why didn't you get your citizenship as it costs less money then a Greencard.
B. I says on the Greencard application that you can't vote as you are not a citizen.
C. Seeeeee- ya
 
Dec 8, 2004
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The rest:

Ms. Ortega’s conviction looks to be an early volley in a reinvigorated partisan war over voting rights — a war led in Texas by Mr. Paxton, who has crusaded against voter fraud. (Coincidentally, he faces legal issues of his own: state securities fraud charges and a federal lawsuit stemming from efforts to recruit investors for a technology company; he has denied wrongdoing.)

Last year, federal courts curbed or nullified Republican-backed laws making it harder to vote, saying they reduced turnout by Democratic-leaning minorities, deliberately or otherwise.

Texas’s strict voter-ID law was among them. A federal appeals court ruled last year that the law hurt Latinos and African-Americans, who were less likely to have the IDs. It later ordered state officials to change their public education campaign on new ID rules.

With President Trump’s election, a new Justice Department and a new conservative nominee to the Supreme Court, Republicans have renewed their push for strict voting requirements in the name of combating fraud. Experts widely dismiss the fraud claims as unfounded. In unguarded moments, a number of Republican politicians have acknowledged as much.

Ms. Ortega’s case is unusual not just for its harshness but for its circumstances. Many fraud convictions that draw prison sentences — and some that do not — involve clear efforts to influence election results. Texas prosecutors won prison sentences for four men who moved into a hotel in 2010 to claim residency so they could sway a local election. A woman in Brownsville, Tex., was placed on five years’ probation for casting five absentee ballots under different names in elections in 2012.

Lawyers offered no clear motive for Ms. Ortega’s decision to cast ballots beyond her desire to participate in elections.

Ms. Ortega, a native of Monterrey, Mexico, came to Texas with her mother when she was an infant. More than a decade later, the family was scattered after the mother was arrested and deported. Two brothers born in Dallas automatically gained citizenship; Ms. Ortega became a permanent resident and gained a green card, her brother Tony Ortega, 35, said in an interview.

As a Dallas County resident, she registered to vote and later cast ballots in elections in 2012 and 2014, her lawyer, Mr. Birdsall, said. While that was illegal, there was no attempt to break the law, he maintained: Some government forms allow applicants to declare that they are permanent residents, but the voting registration form asks only whether an applicant is a citizen.

Lacking the permanent resident option, he said, she ticked the “citizen” box. When the county later mailed her a registration card, he said, she believed she “was good to go.”

Ms. Ortega moved to neighboring Tarrant County and again registered, but this time checked a box affirming that she was not a citizen. When her application was rejected in March 2015, the trial showed, she called election officials and told them that she had previously voted in Dallas County without difficulty.

Told that she could not vote unless she was a citizen, she asked for another application, and returned it with a check in the box affirming citizenship. That raised questions, and law enforcement officials arrested her on fraud charges.

Jonathan White, an assistant attorney general who helped prosecute the Ortega case with Tarrant County officials, said the evidence of fraud was unambiguous. “She told the elections office she was a citizen,” he said. “She told everyone else she wasn’t,” including a recorded statement to prosecutors in which she said she was a citizen of Mexico.

Mr. Birdsall said the arrest and prosecution are punishing a woman for her own confusion over whether residency and citizenship confer the same rights.

“She wasn’t trying to topple the country,” he said. “She was trying to make more serious decisions about our country than the 50 percent of the people who didn’t bother to vote in the last election.”

“This country is so inflamed by this Donald Trump nonsense that they’ve turned her into a whipping boy,” he said.

Ms. Ortega is now in a Fort Worth jail awaiting transfer to a state prison. Her four children, ages 13 to 16, are being cared for by siblings and her fiancé, Oscar Sherman, 27, a trucker who said her arrest had scotched their plans to marry. The children’s fate is unclear. Mr. Sherman lacks legal custody; her siblings are still debating their options.

Ms. Ortega’s future is bleak. The federal government frowns on giving green cards to felons. “She’ll do eight years in a Texas prison,” Mr. Birdsall said. “And then she’ll be deported, and wake up blinking and scratching in a country she doesn’t know.”

Far-right websites have seized on Ms. Ortega’s conviction as proof that Mr. Trump is right about rampant fraud and efforts by Democrats to steal the November election.

There is, however, at least one flaw in that story: Ms. Ortega was a registered Republican.

“She voted for Mitt Romney over Barack Obama in the 2012 election. In 2014 she voted for our current attorney general, Ken Paxton,” Mr. Birdsall said. “And guess what? He’s the one responsible for prosecuting her.”
Ms. Ortega is now in a Fort Worth jail awaiting transfer to a state prison. Her four children, ages 13 to 16, are being cared for by siblings and her fiancé, Oscar Sherman, 27, a trucker who said her arrest had scotched their plans to marry. - Where's the chulo that dumped the 4 loads into her?
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
Nov 1, 2004
13,375
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#9
That’s really not that shocking to me, between the morons that work at the dmv and the people who will do anything to get out of the DMV, I will say that while it’s a little disturbing that non citizens are registered to vote I don’t think it’s a mass conspiracy, just one more example of the ineptitude of government in general.
Yeah, a "glitch"

You're probably half right, but I'm sure there's directives from the higher ups as well.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
43,671
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#10
You know, I might buy that if they were just accidentally registered, but some of them actually voted. How is that not intent?
You overestimate the intelligence of people
 

HandPanzer

O Tempora O Mores!
May 30, 2013
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#11
Isn't it strange how mistakes and glitches in media and voting all seem to favor a certain side?
 
Dec 8, 2004
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L8r...



Link


A. Why didn't you get your citizenship as it costs less money then a Greencard.
B. I says on the Greencard application that you can't vote as you are not a citizen.
C. Seeeeee- ya

Ha ha cunt...

This Woman Got 8 Years In Prison For Illegal Voting. Texas Is Showing No Mercy.



Rosa Maria Ortega was sentenced to eight years in prison for voting illegally, even though she said she didn't know she was breaking the law

A Texas appeals court last week refused to overturn the conviction of a 39-year-old mother of four who has been sentenced to eight years in prison for illegal voting. She could also be deported.

There’s little dispute that Rosa Maria Ortega did in fact break the law. Ortega came to the United States from Mexico as a baby and was living in the U.S. as a legal permanent resident. Although it’s against the law for non-citizens to vote in Texas, Ortega registered to vote in 2002 as a Republican and then cast ballots multiple times over more than a decade. She tried to register again after moving in 2014, which is when state investigators noticed something was amiss. They arrested her in January 2016.

To Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R), this is an open-and-shut case of voter fraud ― Ortega lied about being a citizen, voted multiple times and now is being punished.

But the evidence in Ortega’s case tells a far more complex story and illustrates the enormous discretion that prosecutors have in pursuing incidents of voter fraud.

Throughout her trial, Ortega maintained that she had no idea she couldn’t vote. She said she didn’t know the difference between a U.S. citizen and a legal permanent resident. She was brought to the United States when she was very young and two of her brothers were born in the U.S. According to one brother, her entire family thought she was a citizen.

“She has a sixth-grade education. She didn’t know she wasn’t legal,” Ortega’s lawyer told The New York Times in 2017. “She can own property; she can serve in the military; she can get a job; she can pay taxes. But she can’t vote, and she didn’t know that.”

When Ortega first tried to register at her new residence in 2014, she indicated on her application that she was a non-citizen. Because she checked that box, a local election official sent her a letter saying she was ineligible to vote. Since Ortega had voted before at her old address, she called the local election office to find out why she was being rejected. After learning it was because she’d checked the non-citizen box, she mailed in a second voter registration form indicating that she was a citizen. That application wound up in front of Delores Stevens, the same person who had processed Ortega’s original application and spoken with her on the phone. Stevens registered her to vote.

But then the state attorney general’s office under Paxton received allegations against Ortega and they investigated.

Chiraag Bains, a former prosecutor and civil rights attorney at the U.S. Justice Department, said that because criminal codes are so complicated, prosecutors have an incredible amount of flexibility in deciding whether and how to bring a case. Prosecutors normally consider the culpability of the individual, the severity of the offense and what kind of penalty is necessary to deter future misconduct.

“One thing that’s very clear is that the sentence here is far disproportionate to the conduct,” said Bains, now director of legal strategies at the think tank Demos, which has brought several voting rights cases across the country. “I think there’s a strong argument ... that there are alternative consequences that are more appropriate for conduct like this. Is this a case that somebody needs to go to jail for? No.”
Is this a case that somebody needs to go to jail for? No. Chiraag Bains, a former prosecutor and now director of legal strategies at Demos​
Voter fraud is exceedingly rare in the United States, but Paxton has pursued it zealously in Texas, launching an entire unit within his office focused on the issue.

In the same county where Ortega was prosecuted, an African-American woman was sentenced to five years in prison for illegally voting while she was still on supervised release for an unrelated felony conviction. Like Ortega, Crystal Mason said she didn’t know she was ineligible to vote. The prosecutions of two women of color drew accusations of racism when a white justice of the peace merely received probation after being convicted of turning in forged signatures on the petitions he needed to run for re-election this year.

Beth Stevens, the director of the Voting Rights Program at the Texas Civil Rights Project, said the decision to prosecute Ortega was politically motivated.

“They’re using this case to kind of prop up their claims of widespread illegal voting in the state so that then they can use that claim to make voting laws even harder and more strict,” Stevens told HuffPost. “Imagine if you’re a new citizen and gained the right to vote but are afraid that you’re going to get prosecuted. We see this obvious political gain because it helps the people in power.”

Aggressive pursuit of voter fraud charges isn’t confined to Texas. In North Carolina, a federal prosecutor is bringing charges against 20 immigrants for illegal voting. In at least some of those cases, it appears the people were mistaken or confused about their lack of voting rights.

In February 2017, Ortega was convicted on two counts of illegal voting, a second-degree felony punishable by between two and 20 years in prison. Prosecutors did not recommend a specific sentence for her, but left it up to the jury to decide. They also advised the jury that Ortega could be eligible for early parole.
But just before she was sentenced, a prosecutor suggested to jurors that Ortega was just the tip of the voter fraud iceberg.

“I just want to throw out one thought to you. You came back with the right verdict, [and] that if you hadn’t, if you’d come back with a not-guilty, can you imagine the floodgates that would be open to illegal voting in this county?” the prosecutor said.
Link

“She has a sixth-grade education. She didn’t know she wasn’t legal,” Ortega’s lawyer told The New York Times in 2017. “She can own property; she can serve in the military; she can get a job; she can pay taxes. But she can’t vote, and she didn’t know that.” - Bullshit, green cards are good for 10 years and you either renew them or apply for citizenship. On the application paper work it says "YOU CANNOT VOTE". So stop blowing smoke up my ass.

$20 she doesn't el speako Englisho...
 
Dec 8, 2004
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More

In Ortega’s appeal, her lawyer highlighted that comment, saying it was inflammatory and outside the scope of the case. The appeals court rejected the argument on the grounds that Ortega’s trial attorney hadn’t objected to the remarks at the time in the right way.

Comments like that from a prosecutor are a “dog whistle,” Stevens said.

“The jury should be looking at her issue, not making an example of her to scare other people. Basically that’s what the attorney general’s office was asking the jury to do,” said Stevens. “They laid it all out in that closing statement, basically asking the jury to make something they can hang on the wall, [an] example of this woman, who is a real human being with children and family, on the consequences of this conviction.”
They’re using this case to kind of prop up their claims of widespread illegal voting in the state so that then they can use that claim to make voting laws even harder and more strict. Beth Stevens of the Texas Civil Rights Project​
In a statement after the appeals court’s ruling, Paxton’s office distanced itself from the harsh sentence that Ortega had received, noting that the jury had chosen the length of her prison term.

Bains said it was “disingenuous” to suggest that the prosecutors in Ortega’s case had no control over the sentence. The remark about the voter fraud “floodgates” sent a clear message to jurors about the kind of sentence they should bring.

“That is sending the message to the jury that you need to punish ... severely because of the consequences that will follow if you don’t,” Bains said. “So it’s not surprising that the jury then came back with this disproportionate, heavy sentence of eight years.”

In a 2017 jailhouse interview with the Fort Worth Star Telegram, Ortega continued to insist that she hadn’t meant to break the law.

“I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong. People make mistakes. I had a lot of business and kids and stuff like that. People don’t look. Every time you get an application, you get mistakes.”
-
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
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#15
I said the same thing when they busted the DNC for registering illegals in Texas. They convince illegals they can legally vote, when they do its the illegals who get in trouble if they are busted, the democrat operatives who got them to vote get away.

Texas Dems ask noncitizens to register to vote, send applications with citizenship box pre-checked

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/oct/18/texas-democrats-ask-noncitizens-register-vote/

Its another example that the left only cares about getting power. They don't care who they hurt. As Alinsky said, the ends justifies the means. If you went to a foreign country to live there illegally and knew nothing about how their society works and official people from one of the top parties said you could legally vote there would be no reason to not believe them.
 

domelogic

Registered User
Feb 16, 2005
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#16
You know, I might buy that if they were just accidentally registered, but some of them actually voted. How is that not intent?
Oh we are back to intent again. Well Comey did set the standard for intent now didn’t he. Intent is done the minute you register, period.
 

Floyd1977

Registered User
Nov 1, 2004
13,375
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#17
Oh we are back to intent again. Well Comey did set the standard for intent now didn’t he. Intent is done the minute you register, period.
Well, yes I did have 5 double Sctoch Whiskys at the bar in a span of 90 mins and drove home, but I had no intent of crashing into and killing a family of 5. So all I get is a misdemeanor DWI, right?

Christ, I’m not even a lawyer and know that the Comey “Intent” standard was complete bullshit, From what I understand the first lesson you learn in law school is “ignorance of the law is not a defense”. And I guarantee the Intent standard was designed for Homocide or other violent crime and that Comey just co-opted it to protect Hillary. @THE FEZ MAN, what’s the wife have to say about that?
 
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